Can someone explain the effect of swingweight please

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by robbo1970, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. robbo1970

    robbo1970 Hall of Fame

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    I'm not sure I have asked the question properly in my title but I want to know how two rackets with the same static weight but have different swingweights would feel.

    For example, both rackets have a static weight if 309g, but one has a swingweight of 308 and the other of 320. Will the swingweight of 308 feel lighter and more manouvrable?

    Similarly, how would the 309 static/308 sw feel compared to one with a static of 295 but a sw of 311?

    Many thanks
     
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  2. bugeyed

    bugeyed Semi-Pro

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    Generally, swingweight defines the effort needed to swing the racquet. The higher the swingweight, the more effort required to swing. In your example the racquet with the lower swingweight would feel more maneuverable. A heavier racquet with a lower swingweight would usually feel easier to swing than a lighter racquet with a higher swingweight.

    Cheers,
    kev
     
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  3. robbo1970

    robbo1970 Hall of Fame

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    Thank you so much, that makes a lot of sense and has really helped me out.

    Thanks again.
     
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  4. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    A racket with a low static weight but higher swing weight than a heavier racket will swing slower, but probably will be less stable and will generally have less power.
     
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  5. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    The (static) weight of a racket gives us an idea on how much effort is required to lift the racket or the amount of effort needed to move the racket in a fairly straight line (such as for a short-stroke volley). The swingweight of a racket gives us an idea on easily the racket can be swung (in an arc) -- or "how heavy it feels" when swinging the racket.

    The static weight is related to its mass or its (linear) inertia. The swingweight is a measure of the racket's rotational inertia or moment of inertia (about a standard pivot point at the handle).

    The static weigh and the balance point might will have an effect on the swingweight but they do not tell the whole story. The swingweight is affected by how the mass of the racket is distributed. Two 27" rackets can have the same mass (weight) and balance point but still have different swingweights (due to differences in how their mass is distributed).

    In general, extra-long rackets, head-heavy rackets and very heavy rackets tend to have higher swingweights. Note that golf clubs and baseball bats also use the concept of swingweight (since they are also swung in an arc).

    http://www.acs.psu.edu/drussell/Publications/TPT-SwingWeight.pdf
    http://golf.about.com/cs/componentscustom/a/swingweight.htm
    http://tennis.about.com/library/blswingweight.htm
     
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  6. robbo1970

    robbo1970 Hall of Fame

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    Cheers guys, this has really helped and has prevented me from making what could have been a slight mistake.

    I will be going for the racket that is 309g static and 308 sw. Both the static and swing weight suit me, as does the head size and beam width and the 2pts HL balance.

    I am very happy about my decision too.
     
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