Changed from syn gut to poly - bad idea

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Terminator7t, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. Terminator7t

    Terminator7t New User

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    Since changing strings after they snapped, after two sessions on the court I developed severe bicep pain which prevented me from hitting forehands. After resting for a couple of hours the pain passed though.

    However, I am worried about playing with them again so I want to change them to something else, but I'm unsure what. I am about a 3.0 - 3.5 player, so can any of you recommend some strings? Money is not an object, but ideally I would like something quite durable.
     
    #1
  2. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    Natural gut?
     
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  3. SCRAP IRON

    SCRAP IRON Professional

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    There are many factors as to why you are getting pain. The first thing that comes to mind is your racket. If you are using a racket that weighs less than 11 oz. then you could have an issue. You are a 3.5 player which could mean you have shorter, choppier strokes than an advanced player, and that could contribute to elbow area pain as well. However, assuming that you never had the pain before the poly string and you are playing at least twice a week, I have a solution. I will keep it simple and suggest a few multi-filament strings made by Technifibre. They are great manufacturers of many string types, but their multis will be comfortable and responsive. If you want a softer string that imparts good spin then buy a pack of Technifibre Multi Feel (17g). If you lack power in your game, then you should go with the X1 Bi-Phase string in the 17 gauge as well.

    Take it from me, a guy who has used many strings at many tensions, you do not have to search far to find the most favorable string. One more thing- If you tend to swing hard, you will want to string within a tension range of 57-60 in order to harness the power. In closing, it was good that you tried poly in order to experience the difference, but that string was ultimately created to obtain spin and control for today's advanced, heavy hitters.

    Take care and enjoy the game...
     
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  4. Terminator7t

    Terminator7t New User

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    Thank you for your thorough response. I will try the Technifibre strings and see how it goes.
     
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  5. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    At your level, natural gut would probably last a long time. It will be very soft and offer some nice power plus it will hold tension forever.
     
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  6. THESEXPISTOL

    THESEXPISTOL Hall of Fame

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    You shouldn't be be using poly. That bicep pain usually happens when you are arming your strokes. Swing loose, and even doing that poly can cause you problems related to numerous factors.
     
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  7. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    Go multi. Plenty of choices. Babolat Xcel Premium/Comfort, Dunlop DNA, Prince Premiere with softlex.
     
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  8. RetroSpin

    RetroSpin Hall of Fame

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    It would be helpful to know how old you are, what racquet you are using and what strings/tension broke prematurely. Some racquets are pretty hard on strings, which is one reason poly became popular and kevlar before that. Was it a shank or did they just wear down and snap? Was this the first time using that racquet and if not, is this a common occurrence or a one-off?

    I agree with the other poster that bicep pain sounds like poor stroke mechanics rather than a string issue. I still wouldn't recommend that a 3.0/3.5 player use poly. You likely don't have the technique to get any benefit from it yet you will experience the downside.

    Unless you are a real beast who hits the ball very hard, I would think almost any synthetic gut would be fine. 16 gauge should be more durable. Prince, OG, Forten, Wilson, Gamma, etc all make decent syn gut. Multis typically aren't as durable as syn gut. Natural gut is ideal but seems like overkill at your level, plus you have to be careful with it, not get it damp, etc, and a shank could break it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2013
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