Clamp slippage, can it cause a flying clamp to fly off?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Mansewerz, Jul 30, 2008.

  1. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    I'm curious to know the signs of clamp slippage, especially during tensioning?
     
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  2. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    Any help?!
     
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  3. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    Well, there is string wear and bruising that is outside the boundaries of where the clamp clamps. But, you could attach a paperclip to the string, or something similar, right next to the clamp. If it moves away from the clamp, then the string is slipping. You could also try marking the string next to the clamp with a crayon. Same effect.
     
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  4. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    I see. Because the clamp would sometimes fly off, and I thought it was clamp slippage. It was during the initial main pulls. It especially happened when I removed a clamp to clamp the next main and the bar would drop and the clamp would fly off. I later used a starting clamp to hold back pressure. It worked well. USRSA guide said the most slippage happens in the beginning. Then during stringing, often when I removed the clamp, the tension bar drops. I think this had to do with very subtle clamp slippage, and when i tightened it, it got better, but this was also later in the mains. I usually mark the string to see if there is slippage, and none occurs, but still the bar tends to drop at after I release the clamp.
     
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  5. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    It may be that you are releasing a clamp when you ought not to. This is easy to do if you aren't careful. The result is exactly what you describe. Just be sure that you are releasing the right clamp.
     
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  6. Loco4Tennis

    Loco4Tennis Hall of Fame

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    yes, this happens to me all the time when the clamps are dirty, i usually see the slipage when i forget or neglect to clean them,
    as stated in my string machine user manual, the flying lamps i have require cleaning about every 6 string jobs, of course it all depends of the type of strings i've been using
    do yourself a favor, as sson as you detect slipage, give the clamps a clean, chances are, they are do for one at that point
    by the way, i do also mark on my string log how often i clean the clamps and its right arround the 6th string job
     
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  7. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    After I cleaned the clamps, no problems, but I did also tighten them.

    Wrong clamp? I double pull the mains.

    These are the steps I took.

    Hand pull center mains, clamp. Pull 2nd main, clamp close to the frame. Here is where the trouble came. I pulled the 2nd main on the other side, and when I released the center clamp, the bar drops more, and the other clamp flies off. I think it's a certain clamp that did this. Later, it was the center clamp that flew off.

    So used the USRSA tip and put a starting clamp on to support the clamp that flew off. Fixed it, but I want to solve the whole problem.

    The bar also drops sometimes, especially around the first couple mains after releasing the clamp, and I want to know why. I tighten the clamps, and the bar doesn't drop as much, so I assumed that there was slippage, but when I marked the string, no slippage was shown. Also, this was later in the mains, towards the outside.

    Since I cleaned them, I haven't had one fly off again (hopefully never again). I do however tighten them when I feel the force need to close the clamp isn't enough or when the bar drops.

    I'm also worried about indenting the string and wondering if that is what is causing premature breakage.


    Does this sound right?
     
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  8. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    ^^^Nope. :D If I understand your step correctly, you are pulling the wrong main on the second tension. You need to, after tensioning the 2nd main on one side, you need to tension the first main on the other and then move the first clamp up (but on the same two mains.) THEN, tension the second one on the same side and clamp. This may help.
     
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  9. Loco4Tennis

    Loco4Tennis Hall of Fame

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    i also see this on my drop weight, and i think its because their is no tension in between the clamp teeth on the first 2 mains, you know the ones where you just pulled by hand and then clamped, so since ive notised this one every string job ive done, i tend to not go parallel on that particular pull, thus when it drops (which is not much, it then becomes parallel or very close to it to be within the allowed range

    as per the ghosting you are talking about, thatsthe finner point of stringing, you need to be just tight enough to hold but not tight enough to leave a mark, usually on my clamps its about a 1/4 turn, yours might be different, but you'll find your setting soon enough, i have 60 racquets under my belt, am still learning and picking up tips, but i think i have become more aware now of how my machine operates
     
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  10. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    Oh I see. so double pull the main on one side, and then just string the other normally?
     
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  11. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    That's how I'd do it and it might fix your problem.
     
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  12. nCode747

    nCode747 Semi-Pro

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    my clamp did that once, I have a klippermate the clamps can be fixed
     
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  13. SW Stringer

    SW Stringer Semi-Pro

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    YU - How many racquets have you strung on a dropweight machine? My guess is zero, since the bar dropping after releasing the flying clamp is a common occurance. If you've only strung on electronic CP machines and not DW CP machines then you've never experienced what Mansewerz is talking about. Here's what's happening. You tension one of the mains and get the bar horizontal, and then the next step is to move the flying clamp from the previous position to clamp the newly tensioned main. Due to friction at the grommet and the twisting of the double string clamps at the current position that section of string between the clamp and the grommet doesn't have full tension applied. When you release the clamp to reposition the CP of the DW is able to apply extra pull on that portion of the string and thus the DW arm drops a little. It happens less on the crosses because the clamps don't twist as much. It happens to a lesser extent on fixed clamp machines (ie drawback) and friction at the grommets present the same problem however when you release the clamp to reposition the CP mechanism should automatically take up the slack. If your CP mechanism is a DW it will still drop a little. Just take that into consideration when you set your bar. Put it a little above horizontal so when the slack is taken up it ends up at the correct position.
     
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  14. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    ^^^^ Thanks SW
     
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