Clamping the crosses

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by cltennis21, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. cltennis21

    cltennis21 New User

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    86
    Hey, never posted in this forum but couldn't find a good search on this topic. When clamping the crosses with flixed clamps, should you release the previous clamp before reclamping the new tensioned cross or leave it on until you need it for the next cross?

    Reason I ask is because I've always left it on until I noticed that when I went to take it off that alot of tension was being lost as it transferring to the next cross. Thus I tried the other way but never really quite got the tension down because you have to decrease cross tension due to the now tighter crosses.

    So which way is the proper way that I should use in the future for clients and myself?
     
    #1
  2. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Messages:
    31,167
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Some do the crosses with two clamps (both clamped simultaneously) some use one. Whichever way you do it make sure you're consistent.
     
    #2
  3. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,108
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    I leave it on I think it adds support to the frame especially on a two point machine.
     
    #3
  4. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    7,276
    I leave it on also.
     
    #4
  5. cltennis21

    cltennis21 New User

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    86
    ^do you notice the string moving forward into the newly tensioned string? I might just be doing something wrong or my clamps may be loose.
     
    #5
  6. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,108
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    Sometimes, when working near the top and bottom of the racket very little. But thatis still going to happen because you still have to hold the last tensioned string.
     
    #6
  7. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    6,721
    Ideally, it shouldn't matter. However, due to drawback and clamp shift when you crank a clamp down at the base, it can make a difference. I believe as long as you are consistent with your 'style,' it (to a certain extent) doesn't really matter. Floating clamps are going to exaggerate this behavior, if you're using floaters.

    Since you're using fixed clamps, you can also try to "improve" the accuracy of your tension pull by making sure as much drawback is eliminated as possible. This can be achieved by clamping the head onto the string first, and then shifting the base towards the direction of the tensioner. Don't overdo it, but experiment a little and see how much the clamp shifts back when you try this. You should be able to get a feel for it in a short amount of time. I should also note that it IS possible to use the crank down force and INCREASE tension on a string, as you'll have a mechanical advantage over the tension of the string. If you find that this is too inaccurate for you, line the clamp head up first, then crank the base down, then clamp the head.

    My personal style/preference is actually to pop the previous clamp in most situations. I weave with left hand on bottom almost always, so I'll move the clamp out of the way as soon as I can. This DOES have some risk involved, though, you can accidentally pop a cross clamp with no backup... and it sucks. [sidenote: when fanning and pulling cross strings through, instead of pulling on the same plane as the frame (sideways), pull downwards towards the turn table -- this will lower the risk of popping your only clamp significantly -- less chance of a loop grabbing the handle). If you string on a glide bar clamp, though, like the NEOS, it's very rare to see anyone trying to string with two glidebars/clamps on the crosses.
     
    #7

Share This Page