Co-Poly Durability: 16g v 17g

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Chi, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. Chi

    Chi New User

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    Mar 4, 2009
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    Location:
    England
    Hi all,

    Just wanted to know what your thoughts were on the durability of 17g against 16g co-poly strings are (in general, of course a huge variance on brand/tension etc). Of course the durability is less, as its thinner gauge - but I wanted to get an idea of how much less durable, and what to expect.

    I generally dont break my 16g poly too often - I usually cut them out when they start losing feel etc, but I'm looking at going thinner for the playability etc (and for a new racket setup).

    Question is - Is 17g co-poly easy to snap in comparision?
     
    #1
  2. Tennis Is Magic

    Tennis Is Magic Semi-Pro

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    Jun 17, 2011
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    Yes, there is a pretty noticeable loss in durability. I've found that for every gauge you go down. I break 17g co-polys in about 6-7 hours, and 18 at 4 hours. Though a LOT has to do with the string itself. Generally, the sooner it's been released, the less durable it will be, as co-polys are slowly but surely separating themselves from their 100% polyester ancestors. They're more playable, but made with less durable materials to achieve that.
     
    #2
  3. BigT

    BigT Professional

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    Nov 6, 2006
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    1,220
    17g is less durable, but if you don't break 16g, it's worth a shot.
     
    #3
  4. GlenK

    GlenK Professional

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    Mar 20, 2011
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    St. Augustine, FL
    I've reached the point I won't even string anything above 1.25mm, or below 1.20. Just love strings in that range. Do lose some durability but the added control and feel are much better for me.
     
    #4
  5. parasailing

    parasailing Hall of Fame

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    It's also easier to string 17gauge strings than 16 gauge ones and I try to keep my setups in the 17 guage and thinner variety.
     
    #5

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