College help

Discussion in 'College Tennis Talk' started by hamstertennis, Sep 8, 2008.

  1. hamstertennis

    hamstertennis New User

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    I wanna start off by saying that i have read alot of the posts on this fourms and i think this is a very helpful source in the college searth.

    Now to my question- for the last couple of weeks i have been vividly looking for a colleges where i can play tennis. I am more than pretty sure that I want to go to a DIII school and I want to use tennis as a tool in getting into a good school education wise. On tennis recruiting my ranking in my class is right around 300.

    Now i was wondering if you guys/girls would have any suggestions on good DIII schools with a good engineering program.

    I also am wondering what kind of support i common for someone with a ranking right around mine. i know it depends on the school but just i general.

    Thanks
     
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  2. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    Any preference geographically?

    Any particular major in engineering?
     
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  3. hamstertennis

    hamstertennis New User

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    um i really dont care where it is... if anything maybe a not in the middle of no where

    i looking in the area of industrial engineering or anything like industrial (systems engineering and stuff like that)
     
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  4. Wondertoy

    Wondertoy Professional

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    For D1 you have a shot at the weaker tennis schools with good engineering: Bucknell, Lehigh, Lafayette, UCONN and Villanova. For D3 try Carnegie Mellon, Wentworth Tech, St. Lawrence, Clarkson, Rochester and Case Western. Good luck.
     
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  5. KBlade Pro

    KBlade Pro New User

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    How are your grades? MIT, CalTech, and Harvey Mudd are all great technical schools, and I believe they're all D3 (not sure about MIT).
     
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  6. hamstertennis

    hamstertennis New User

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    my grades are ok... i have a 3.6 gpa and got in the 30s in the act in math
     
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  7. hamstertennis

    hamstertennis New User

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    also what is the main difference between weak/small D1 and DIII
     
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  8. Wondertoy

    Wondertoy Professional

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    Not a lot in terms of tennis level. BTW, 3.6 weighted is low for the Ivys and New England liberal arts colleges. You need to get a move on as the recruiting season for seniors is in high gear.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2008
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  9. kctennis1005

    kctennis1005 Guest

    3.6 weighted is terrible these days.....it wont get u into most top 50 national schools...prob even lower. no chance for ivies or small NE lacs
     
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  10. duso

    duso New User

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    KC is once again using this forum as a way of advertising himself, and stroking his ego. The college you attend (name) has little to do with success in the future. Look at Denison in Ohio, they have a co-op program with Case Western Reserve. Almost every university now realizes that grade inflation is ever present. Don't sweat your GPA. KC should read how the University of Michigan looks at GPA. Oh, Michigan is a state school, so its beneath KC. Others to look at for engineering, would be Carnagie Mellon, and Marquette.
     
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  11. duketennisgal

    duketennisgal Rookie

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    I don't have much to add to this thread, but I did want to let you know that if you are really looking to play tennis, if the coach likes you it really doesn't matter what your GPA is (as long as it's within reason). A coach can get you into a school as long as you meet the minimum requirements. I used my tennis as a method of getting me into a Division I school that I wanted to go to.
     
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  12. hamstertennis

    hamstertennis New User

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    thanks for the input... what type of scholarships(or what ever they call them in DII) will they give and is it usually a good amount?
     
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  13. hamstertennis

    hamstertennis New User

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    i mean DIII
     
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  14. tree90

    tree90 New User

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    how does the University of Michigan look at GPA's?
     
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  15. kctennis1005

    kctennis1005 Guest

    duso, i was not trying to flaunt my ego and was rather responding to an earlier post that said a 3.6 weighted could get you into ivies and good new england lacs. this is not a true statement in the ultra-competitive academic atmosphere today. i never said a smaller school isn't good. maybe the subject of a top school is a sore subject with you because you chose not to attend one. i dont know your situation though. i was not saying anything about myself there, but rather making a comment.
     
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  16. duso

    duso New User

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    I understand the University of Michigan doesn't accept weighted GPAs.

    Thank you KC, but I graduated from Dartmouth. Its a good school. My point has always been the schools makes little difference in your success in life or your profession. Oh, I also played tennis there!
     
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  17. kctennis1005

    kctennis1005 Guest

    duso, are you successful now? i agree that the reputation of a school doesnt make a difference in life success but the people around you and the experience you can have at a school like dartmouth are very different than those at a big state school. u will have smaller class sizes and more personal interaction with teachers who want you to know the material....not just teaching the class so they can do their research later. im sure dartmouth played a part in helping your life and i think there is a reason the top schools are regarded so highly. a school like dartmouth is not for everyone, but neither is michigan or ohio state. it all depends on where you will have the most fulfilling experience and grow as a person the most. i think i would grow more at a medium good school like the schools i mentioned before, and even dartmouth.
     
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  18. duketennisgal

    duketennisgal Rookie

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    The school I attended does not accept weighted GPAs either. I was shocked when I found this out because my unweighted GPA was only 3.25 but my weighted was around a 4.2. It's one thing that doesn't make any since at all to me. I could have taken all basic classes and made a 4.0 GPA but I chose to take Advanced/AP courses. I would have never been able to attend the school that I graduated from had it not been for my playing tennis because I was told that my GPA was too low.
     
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  19. Federer#1

    Federer#1 New User

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    Pro tennis play don't go to college!
    I am just kidding.

    I am new here to find some fun...
     
    #19
  20. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Johns Hopkins is Division 3 and has an engineering school
     
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  21. MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER

    MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER Semi-Pro

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    I think they may have a "smallish" medical program, as well.
    Welcome Federer #1
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2008
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  22. OleNole

    OleNole Rookie

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    op, I would recomend you go to

    tennisrecruiting.net

    It should give you some idea of where you fall as far as schools you could play at. Some D3's, like Middlebury, Emory, CMS, etc. get 4 star recruits, and are probably out of your reach. But other top academic schools would probably be thrilled to have you play for them. Do you know what part of the country you'd like to attend school in?
     
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  23. marklbucla

    marklbucla New User

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    I'd imagine that Michigan is probably just looking at AP scores or something else. Either that, or they're doing something similar to what UCLA has been doing to add diversity the school.
     
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  24. JMS

    JMS Professional

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    When did he ever say it was weighted?
     
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  25. hamstertennis

    hamstertennis New User

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    To answer your question olenole i really do not care what part of the country the schools is in... as long as it has a good edu i really dont care

    and 3.6 is my weighted gpa :( but i take all AP/honors classes
     
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  26. JMS

    JMS Professional

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    Well the more honors and AP classes you take the more opportunities you have to boost your weighted GPA.
     
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  27. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    All true. And, at a place such as Dartmouth, they will even teach students how to use the Shift key.
     
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  28. SoloAJ

    SoloAJ New User

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    There is pretty much a grammatical error in every post in this thread. Can we please stop trying to stroke ourselves about our college education?

    Here's the deal. KC is right. 3.6 is low for weighted. An ACT of 31/32 in math will help somewhat, but they're going to consider your composite score more. So, those saying you will have trouble getting into a top school are probably correct. It wouldn't be impossible, but it's an uphill battle.

    That said, others are correct, too. You can get a good education from schools that aren't nationally prestigious. It's more about what you put into your university efforts and how motivated you are to succeed both during and after college. So just stick to your desires and work work work.

    That's how I'd respond to this thread, if I were so inclined.
     
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  29. marklbucla

    marklbucla New User

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    No matter what, be sure you actually visit the school and talk with students there about their experiences. Be cautious though, what's good/bad/hard/easy is entirely relative and subjective. You can't just go by the rankings and perceptions alone to gauge what level of education you'll receive. There's much more to it than you'll read about in books or online.

    I went to three large public schools throughout the course of my education and all were pretty different in the way they taught, levels of expectation, and the way grades are determined. I don't believe that rankings and quality of education have a positive relationship. I've found that the opposite has been true for me.
     
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