College tennis help

Discussion in 'College Tennis Talk' started by roddick_rulz, Aug 24, 2008.

  1. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    I'm curently around a 4.0 ntrp and am going into my junior year at high school.
    I'm wondering what the general level u need to play at the college level.
    Also, I was wondering what universities in California that you can recommend that I could probably make that have both good academics and tennis.
    Thanks
     
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  2. MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER

    MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER Semi-Pro

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    ^ I will try to answer for all posters.
    Figure out how to search threads on this board and read what you find.

    You have found a very good resource that has all your questions answered, in one thread or another- It just is not too realistic to expect someone else to try and put together a simple answer to such a broad series of questions.

    You may want to start by reading everything Coach Carter has posted- Search by "NAME" of poster. He has posted some very interesting New York Times articles on what to expect in college.

    Good Luck.
     
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  3. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    If you can possibly improve to 4.5 level, perhaps division 3 school could accept you on the team. All division 1 colleges are 5.5 or above. If you are 4.0, i would just concentrate on Academics and try to get into colleges like UCLA, CAL or if you are a truly exceptional student, then possibly Stanford. and they have good Club tennis which travel and play very competitive tennis so you could continue your tennis that way. But Please concentrate on the Academics above all else at this point.
     
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  4. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    I recommend making a list of about 10 d2 & d2 schools that you'd like to
    go to academic-wise. Then find out what their tennis team is like.
    If you work really hard the next year you have a chance of making it on the
    team. You better start competing and playing some tournaments if you aren't
    already. Practice your doubles, too.
     
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  5. Julieta

    Julieta Guest

    Great advice from previous posters. To emphasize though, if you continue to improve and work hard there is no reason you cannot play. Some people think college tennis is insanely tough and give up on playing before they look at all options. Don't let this happen to you if you really want to play. Not all DI programs are 5.5+ level. There are definitely 4.5 players and even 4.0 in some cases. The top programs though, yes they are 5.5 or really even 6.0. UCLA etc. is pretty much tour level so if you want to go to those schools club tennis would be your best option.
     
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  6. 35ft6

    35ft6 Legend

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    Unless you make huge improvements, not sure which schools in California would really meet your requirements. I guess it depends on what you mean by good academics. If you're willing to move out of state, your choices increase considerably. Maybe look into schools in a conference like this one. Say you get to strong 4.5 by end of senior year, you have a decent junior ranking (like top 100 or so in So Cal), I don't see why you couldn't make a squad, get to practice and travel with them, but if you want to play, it might be iffy. IMO you would be right on the borderline of making number 6 singles or so.

    Again, if it's really important to get the full college tennis experience, getting to play and travel, plus some solid academics, not sure if California is your best bet (actually, I'm thinking more of So Cal... seems like even the community college teams here are pretty solid...). Nationwide, plenty of teams you can make. And I would never discourage anybody from trying to play college tennis, but if you HAVE to choose, I would go to a stronger school. You can probably find or create an intramural league of some sort there.
     
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  7. CAM178

    CAM178 Hall of Fame

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    4.0-4.5: D3
    5.0: D2
    5.0-6.0: D1

    In CA, you're going to be lucky to warm the bench. CA is way hard. Imagine all of the strong juniors in CA who want to stay home. Now imagine that you're going to have to play one of them for a spot.

    For a small non-tennis, non-powerhouse school, you can make it. You'll play 3 dubs or 6 singles, but you can do it.

    I would strongly recommend playing as much as you can, and playing as many tournaments and practice matches that you can between now and college. With hard work, you can make it.

    Good luck. :)
     
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  8. 35ft6

    35ft6 Legend

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    The D-3 guys in So Cal are going to be at 4.5, and the top ones are probably 5.5. I guess it now comes down to how we define 5.5, but the guy currently ranked 17th nationally in singles for D-3, who plays for a So Cal D-3 team:
     
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  9. tennismike33

    tennismike33 Semi-Pro

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    You have been given a lot of great advice by the posters here. One area that they may have overlooked which is a good training ground and a great place to improve, both academically and tennis IQ is the junior college ranks. Check Brad Gilbert, he started at a JC.

    Good luck in your search.
     
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  10. gokou703

    gokou703 Rookie

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    You can do what I did. Concurrent enrollment during my second year of JC tennis. Which means I was enrolled at a four year university and enrolled/played at a local Junior College tennis team. If you're good at academics it's possible to do. I had to take 25 units between both schools. =/
     
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  11. 10isDad

    10isDad Hall of Fame

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    Take the ratings quoted by folks here with a grain of salt. In all 3 divisions, player levels vary significantly. There are D3 schools that can beat some D1 schools. People tend to think D1 and equate it only with the powerhouses.

    Look at the D1 schools that many (or most) people haven't heard of: Morehead State, Longwood, Lipscomb, etc., etc. (remember there are over 270 D1 schools offering men's tennis). Look at some of these school's rosters and you'll see that many have local players. Many of these schools don't have a recruiting budget and end up filling their rosters with local kids just to fill the line-up. Do some further research and you'll see that there are 2-star and below in all 3 divisions.
     
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  12. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    Yes, Even D-3 guys at top ranked schools are really good players. Those guys compete well with D-1 players when they hit together.
     
    #12
  13. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Thanks for all the information.
    I'm not actually from Cali, I just have a lot of relatives and like it a lot there.
    I was interested in going to USF (University of San Francisco), what's the level like there?
     
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  14. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    Here is their web page on tennisrecruiting.net. Looks like they got some good ******** in 2005 from California and then signed three foreign players in 2007. Pepperdine dominates the conference.

    Tennisrecruiting.net is a web site you need to get familiar with if you are evaluating colleges.
     
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  15. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    And, of course, I forgot that those who run this site are still too lazy to fix the bug that is causing r-e-c-r-u-i-t-s to be censored.
     
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  16. gokou703

    gokou703 Rookie

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    The level of play at USF is quite high. I know a couple players on their team and they're 5.5 to open level. Not sure how the lower ranked players on the team are but definately not a bad bunch of players there.
     
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  17. MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER

    MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER Semi-Pro

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    ^ Yeah, USF is great... Now hand over $40,000 a year and you are in.

    If there are 270 DIVISION I schools offering Mens Tennis, why does TENNIS RECRUITING only post, maybe @75 by conference?
    I'll pull up old thread for TENNIS RECRUITING founder (on kid's thread) and ask him the same.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2008
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  18. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    I started counting on their Men's Teams Page. Going from left to right, top to bottom, Indiana was the 75th team I counted. The conferences are listed alphabetically, so I was not out of the letter B (Big Ten).

    Maybe your skills at estimating the number of entries on a page with a 2-second glance need some improving. :)
     
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  19. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    Holy Cross is program #200; I have made it down to the letter P (Patriot League) ... still going ...
     
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  20. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    ... and Utah State, the last school listed, comes in at #272. Done.
     
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  21. MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER

    MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER Semi-Pro

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    Gee, Thanks Clarke for counting (and having the life to do it).
    I really did not give it a fair count or even estimate- Little busy figuring out how to turn Polish missile stations around 180.
     
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  22. 10isDad

    10isDad Hall of Fame

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    I copied and pasted the listing into Excel and let it do the counting... An easier method is various r-e-c-r-u-i-t-i-n-g websites that actually give the stats. For example berecruited dot com lists the following (includes both men's and women's team counting individually...):

    NCAA Teams & Scholarships

    D1 576 teams / 3,680 scholarships
    D2 382 teams / 2,040 scholarships
    D3 673 teams / --- scholarships
     
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  23. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    Thanks. Those scholarship numbers appear to be the NCAA limits, rather than the actual funding available. Many programs are not fully funded.

    For D1, 576 teams seems to mean 272 men's teams and 304 women's teams. The scholarship limits are 4.5 for men and 8.0 for women, I believe. 272 times 4.5 = 1224 men's scholarships at the limit. 304 times 8.0 = 2432 scholarships at the limit. Total would be 3656, which is about what they got.

    So, the actual available scholarship money is quite a bit less. Some schools comply with Title IX by offering even less than 4.5 scholarships to the men's team (and sometimes less than 8.0 for the women's team; could be 2.0 men and 5.0 women, for example).
     
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  24. MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER

    MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER Semi-Pro

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    One of Coach Carter's posts has a series of newspaper articles attached, very enlightening reading. What I got out of the interviews with "minor sports" coaches is-

    Parents and players expecting much greater amounts of money is available when it just is not.

    How much work is expected from the players every day- no time to get the full experiences of school for the money offered. How many drop their sports.

    How every administrator kept saying that there was so much more money to offer on the "scholarship" side- Having grades making the difference.

    How much "pure luck" there is in being seen at the right time just when a player hits a peak.

    I am going to start a thread to compare/ contrast and examine these recruitng sites Vs. the value received- I mean, there are what, a couple dozen?
    I could see using a "professional advisor/service" for the realities of chasing down money for school- But chasing althletic scholarships? Phffft.........
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2008
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  25. roddick_rulz

    roddick_rulz Semi-Pro

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    Last question, I was just wondering, how good is UC Santa Barbara's tennis team?
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2008
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  26. 10isDad

    10isDad Hall of Fame

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    Do some research - it isn't hard...

    Go to the team's website http://ucsbgauchos.cstv.com/sports/m-tennis/ucsb-m-tennis-body.html

    You'll find out a pretty important piece of information related to the question you asked right on that page.

    Go to the roster page. Look up the players (international players on itftennis.com, US players at tennisrecruiting.net).

    Go the the Results/Statistics page. It'll have a link to tell you the order these players played. It'll tell you the teams they played and the scores - and you can look up these teams, too.

    The point is: do some of the work yourself, especially if you're interested in the team.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2008
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  27. CAM178

    CAM178 Hall of Fame

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    The thing about college tennis is that you can find ballers just about anywhere. When I played college tennis, the only schools that we were really worried about were juco's (junior colleges), and ABAC, in particular. The juco's had some frighteningly good players. Most had played satellites, & you just didn't come across much of that in DII.
     
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