Communicating with your partner during a point - Court of Appeals

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by W Cats, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. W Cats

    W Cats Rookie

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    What's your understanding of the rule for communicating with your partner during a point. The other day during a doubles match an opponent hit a shot that my netman was going for. I yelled "no" so that my partner would let it go as I thought the ball would be heading out. At this point the opposing team said that I had called it after my partner contacted it and therefore was a distraction. This was a split second call maybe he was right about the timing maybe not, my intention was to call my net man off so if it was after it must have been the slow speed of sound or hearing involved. He said that the only time you can communicate with your partner is after the opponent has contacted and before you or your opponent contacts said shot. What da ya think?
     
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  2. naylor

    naylor Semi-Pro

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    You must have been playing the Wimbledon doubles final, for your opponents to feel so priggish about it...

    I think you should now read the "What's your stand on hitting a player on purpose...for strategic reasons?" thread and write down all the excuses for drilling your opponent on purpose, for when you play the same pairing again...
     
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  3. W Cats

    W Cats Rookie

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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    LOL The guy was nice about it, but serious.

    I even had a situation once where I as the netman yelled "out" to my partner at the baseline about to hit a ground stroke, the ball hits the line, partner who is smarter than me gets strings on and ball becomes playable, but other team calls interference because they stopped playing when I said "out". I replied by letting them know that the ball had yet to bounce when I said "out' and that I was commuicating with my partner. I have since changed my vocabulary to "no" or "bounce" in such situations.
     
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  4. smoothtennis

    smoothtennis Hall of Fame

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    The first situation is just silly if you ask me, but the second one you describe, I can see it from the opponents point of view. As that ball is hitting and you are yelling 'OUT' it can cause the other team automatically stop playing.
     
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  5. Zachol82

    Zachol82 Professional

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    Pardon my language but that is just a bunch of BS. You can call to your partner whenever you want. For example, if you miss-hit a shot and it's a bad lob AND your partner is up at the net, you can obviously call your partner to get out of the way or step back. In this case, you'd be calling right after you hit that bad lob, so it's way before your opponent even gets a chance to hit the ball.

    You were probably playing a bunch of *****s or something of the likes :evil:
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010
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  6. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Well, basically the ruling should be that if you "normally" call an out ball "no", or any other term that means out, than you can't un-ring the bell. "Bounce", "bounce it", "me", "you" have become accepted terms to cover some of the situation you described.

    But it sounds like your partner took the ball in the air (volley) "before" it bounced so it sounds like, as someone else said, the opposition was nit-picking. However, the rules do say that any action on your part or partners, that causes the other team to stop playing or think the point is over, should be considered a hindrance and you lose the point. This of course is one of those "gray" areas that has/does cause confusion.

    Unless the match is an exhibition, you never see the pros or even top players doing very much/if any talking during the point. At lower levels, sometimes there seems to be a ongoing conversation going which would drive me nuts.
     
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  7. naylor

    naylor Semi-Pro

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    Agreed. "Me", "You", "Switch" simply define who'll take the ball so should cause no confusion. You just have to get used to yelling "bounce" when you're not 100% sure so your partner should let it bounce but follow it and be ready to play it if it's in, and "leave" when you're pretty sure it'll be going out - that way there's no question you're talking to your partner, rather than calling the ball "out" (for your partner not to hit) before it actually goes out of play.

    I usually use "no" on serves when I'm the receiver's partner standing on the service line - somehow, it's quicker than "out". But also, I often call "yes" to my mixed doubles partners on slowish second serves that are coming over with some spin than makes them bend and land close to the middle line but in - basically, "move and hit it!"
     
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  8. Kostas

    Kostas Semi-Pro

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    When I hit a bad lob I usually just loudly moan "awwww hell"....

    To call of my net-man I yell: itsgoingoutdonthititahhhhnoooo....it's ok partner...next time...lol
     
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  9. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    The big question now is did they make any attempt to rtn your partners shot?
    If they did, then they have no call to make anyway, as that attempt then disqualifies them from claiming hindrance.

    He is correct about when com can take place, but he and his partner must not attempt to make a rtn if they want to make this claim.
     
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  10. tennis24

    tennis24 Rookie

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    thats not curteous
     
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  11. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Does it really work this way?

    I mean, there are lots of actions I could take that might cause my opponents to stop playing, but there would be no hindrance. Like dropping my racket or falling down. Or screaming bounce and then having my partner hit it anyway. So long as I am not talking while the ball is on its way to my opponents, they cannot claim hindrance due to my talking, right? I guess the exception would be if I really am making shouting "Out" and then playing the ball, no?

    Here's the rule, BTW:

    Papa:

    I see the pros talk to each other quite a lot in doubles. They don't have to call their own lines, but they do tell each other to bounce it, they do call mine and yours on questionable balls. That's pretty much what we low-level folks do, right?
     
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  12. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    There are no "magic words" that you can say ("mine," etc.) and others that you can't say ("out," "no," etc.).

    The importance is the context of the call. If, in your situation, you said no to a ball that is obviously in (not yet bounced) and your partner hit the ball, even before your message, than the your opponents should reasonably get to the ball and play out the point. If there is confusion, you could get a let to reply a point (e.g., your opponents think you called a bouncing ball out, but you said something else, like "in - right on the line")

    You did not make an intentional act to disrupt the opponents during their stroke.
     
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  13. xFullCourtTenniSx

    xFullCourtTenniSx Hall of Fame

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    My favorite is "bounce it" really quickly.
     
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  14. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    No, what a lot of lower level players do is almost carry on a running conversation. Like "look out, get back, your about to get hit because I hit it short, sorry" or "oh, god, here we go again, cover the alley because he's going to hit over there and I can't cover" - I'm just making these up but you get the idea anyway. Higher ended players might say "you", "me", "back", "bounce", etc. In other words their conversation does not confuse the opposition because they are using a variety of terms that have come to be accepted during the flow of a point.
     
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  15. blakesq

    blakesq Professional

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    Someone posted the rule as follows:


    "Talking during a point. A player shall not talk while the ball is moving
    toward the opponent’s side of the court. If the player’s talking interferes with
    an opponent’s ability to play the ball, the player loses the point. Consider the
    situation where a player hits a weak lob and loudly yells at his or her partner
    to get back. If the shout is loud enough to distract an opponent, then the
    opponent may claim the point based on a deliberate hindrance. If the opponent chooses to hit the lob and misses it, the opponent loses the point
    because the opponent did not make a timely claim of hindrance."


    Thus, you normally can talk to your partner if the ball is moving towards your side of the court. However, if your opponents are going to be jerks and call a hindrance, then they must do it immediately, they cannot wait until the rally continues a few more strokes, or when the point is over.
     
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  16. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Yes, your absolutely correct - you can't wait and play the point and then decide to call it, it has to be immediate.
     
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