Computer Science

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by Maximagq, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    How many of the posters here have a degree in CS or some background knowledge of programming? I'm a CS major right now but I am considering switching since I find it difficult... Any advice? Should I stick through it?
     
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  2. Lavs

    Lavs Professional

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    I am Software Engineer.
    What field of CS are you working on and why you found it difficult?
     
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  3. Chico

    Chico Banned

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    Me too. If you like the field to stick with it. Lots of jobs. Decent wages.

    However is you don't have the passion and do not like doing it than switch. Don't torture yourself. I have many coworkers who are in the field only because it is/was in demand and do not like it. It is a pain working with them.

    Why do you find it difficult? Why do you consider switching?
     
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  4. coolblue123

    coolblue123 Hall of Fame

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    Lots of discipline involved in CS.

    Gotta ask yourself why you are in it?
    Believe it or not, Software Engineering has gotten a lot easier now than in the past. Also of the codes are now either pre-written or you can easily google it.

    But a lot of folks don't like it because they don't understand the logic involved. But that goes with doing anything in life. Once you figure out the plan, it becomes a lot easier and less stressful because you know to do and when to do it. I had several excellent CS professors in my univ, they always tell me programming is like telling a story. Once you can tell me the plan from start till end. It becomes a lot easier.
    Hope it helps.
     
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  5. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I do not have a CS background but I did take 1 programming course in school that I was not good at. Now I can program in a variety of languages but I'm self taught. If your only obstacle is degree of difficulty but you like it, I say stick with it.
     
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  6. PaulFCB

    PaulFCB Semi-Pro

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    Lots of jobs in this domain including here.
    Problem is many times they find you the perfect slave to work 10+/day to achieve your goals even though it's still presented as a 8 hour job at most.

    You gotta have nerves of steel here too, but it's not like it's better in other domains these days.
     
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  7. krz

    krz Professional

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    I don't have a CS degree I'm applied math/economics but, I know that the current marketplace holds CS degrees in high esteem for a couple reasons.

    1. They are generally difficult compared to other majors.
    2. You actually leave school with hard skills (programming)
    3. In the world of CS, problem solving/logic are the kings and that's what we want in new hires.

    I think the outlook is bright for those with programming skills. Note, I did not say CS degrees, as programming is easily self taught. My realm, data science/analytics is really taking off and will continue to.

    With that being said. If you don't like CS then get out. It takes a certain personality type to excel and it's definitely not for everyone.

    Find what you're good at, it doesn't matter what you do, as long as you are the best at what you do, you will succeed.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
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  8. bblue777

    bblue777 Banned

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    IT is a very wide field. You can gravitate towards more technical (programming and such), or more functional/managerial (management consulting and such).

    $$ earned to $$ invested, IT's reward/effort ratio is quite high.

    Also, you can end up with fairly flexible work schedules.

    There is also the possibility to go to the Silicon Valley and strike it rich lol.
     
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  9. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    FWIW - While it's helpful to understand programming, not everyone in the technology field is a hard-core programmer/developer. If you have an interest in tech, you could look around where you can leverage that skill and combine it with other interests such as business, finance, medicine, etc.

    My undergrad was in English / Communications but my Masters is in Information Systems. My first job in IT was sort of a general IT department position that spanned from networking, to help desk, to a bit of coding and creating and maintaining databases. I'm far from a hard-core developer.

    In my current job I support a cloud computing project and develop documentation used on our project and by other cloud computing companies and do a bit of Business Analyst work, gathering requirements for programs.

    Security is a pretty hot field, but not everyone in security is a hard-core programmer. Some of the security assessments I've seen are mostly reviewing documentation and understanding the requirements and government or organizational policies regarding securing systems.
     
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  10. krz

    krz Professional

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    This is a completely serious question as I don't work in software development but, I never got the role of the "business analyst."

    Are the developers that socially stunted that they can't liaise/learn the business or is the business that technically incompetent that they can't communicate what they need to the developers?
     
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  11. McLovin

    McLovin Hall of Fame

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    As a 20+ year software developer, I can say absolutely positively 100% the answers to that question are 'yes' and 'yes'...
     
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  12. McLovin

    McLovin Hall of Fame

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    All kidding aside, and I apologize for the derailment, but I've come to learn that the #1 issue between software developers and business managers is this:
    When business managers ask a question, they are looking for a simple 'yes' or 'no' answer.

    When software developers answer a question, it is almost always 'it depends', followed by a 5-10 minute technical discussion of their 3-4 options, another 10-15 minutes of discussion on what the advantages/disadvantages/risks are of each, and concluded with a qualifier that there may be options 5, 6, and 7 that they don't know about, and that they really won't know how much time it will take until they get in & look at the problem.​
     
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  13. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    McLovin provides some good answers. Maybe a bit of both.

    Beyond that, if you have a staff of highly paid, very technically skilled developers, where would you want them to spend 80% their time?

    Spending a lot of time fielding requests for software that may already be covered by existing packages or trying to judge if the business case for the request is valid, or doing what they probably want to do and develop software and deal with the technical issues?

    Of course there are multiple ways to approach this problem, but in some cases it's helpful for the developers to have someone go in initially, nail down the client's main problem, gather info on the data and systems involved, the funding available, and what the business side wants to do before getting the developers heavily involved. This person could be a developer, in some cases it's not.

    Been more than a few times where the business brings in a laundry list and by the time you tell them how long it might take and how much it costs, they aren't so gung-ho.
     
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  14. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    It is very common in this field. Most of the work is repetitive with minor differences, and most people who write software get fed up with the incessant demand for changes and degradation of the software design, and try to dump it on others and run away to another project. Escapism is the usual route because every complex piece of software becomes a liability in the end.

    On the other hand, jobs are plentiful for those who can put up with the cr*p and money is easy to come by.
     
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  15. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Is that because of the changes in OSes and hardware? They constantly update those things and screw things up, right?
     
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  16. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Add constant security updates and additions of new few features too that list too.
     
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  17. maggmaster

    maggmaster Hall of Fame

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    I have a CS degree but work in IT as a systems engineer. The degree, if done right, teaches you how to think analytically. This skill can be leveraged in all walks of life.
     
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  18. Seth

    Seth Hall of Fame

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    I graduated from college in 2010 and my biggest regret was not getting a CS degree.

    The writing is on the wall: The world is moving further and further along technologically. Jobs are everywhere. Meanwhile I'm having to get a Masters to become employable.
     
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  19. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    The thing with IT is that if you have the inclination and the motivation you can basically teach yourself somethings.

    As for needing a masters, that seems to be true with just about any field now days. The bar is much higher.
     
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  20. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Add in that Microsoft doesn't improve their OS much with each iteration. They just move and rename everything.
     
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  21. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    No, it is more to do with new features being incompatible with the original design and the inability of management to understand the complexity of implementation. A lots of people will comment on your stuff, but no one will actually work on it. So engineers get disgruntled and figure out they may as well become one of the managers and adopt a "do it and let me know" attitude towards their team members.
     
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  22. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    I am a freshman in college who had no prior programming experience. I probably just need more practice because I find it interesting when I actually do understand what is going on haha.
     
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  23. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    You're somewhat at a disadvantage as there are some, perhaps many depending on the school, that have had many years of programming before getting to college.
     
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