Consistent Player VS Consistent Player

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Gee Willikers Batman!, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. Gee Willikers Batman!

    Gee Willikers Batman! Professional

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    High School Tennis Tournament (Team Tennis)

    Singles Line #2

    Player Biography (Opponent) : Killer forehand, consistent backhand, mediocre volleys, great serves (80mph ROUGHLY, may have been mid 70's) and a VERY CONSISTENT PLAYER

    My Biography: Consistent Forehand AND Backhand, alright volleys, mediocre (60 mph serve, yes I know slow) and I also am pretty dang consistent.

    HOW DO I WIN AGAINST PLAYERS LIKE THIS? THEY ARE SO CONSISTENT, AND SO AM I, SO RALLIES TEND TO GO UP TO 10-15 BALLS! AND WITH MY ASTHMA I CAN'T KEEP PLAYING FOR SO LONG OF RALLIES.

    also...

    I CANNOT HIT WINNNERS! I tend to go for way too much and miss the lines by some, 1-3 inches.

    What do you do in this situation? Players both very consistent and both cannot winners. What are you supposed to do?

    Regards, GWB
     
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  2. ubel

    ubel Professional

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    Stop making excuses for the possiblity of you losing and just win. Do the best you can to be the better player because that's all you can be expected to do. Don't go in there and fold if things aren't going your way, fight until the end and MAKE him fight tooth and nail to beat you.

    Also, you don't have to hit winners every ball, you just have to place the ball in such a way that'll increase the likelihood of him making errors. For example, making him run around by placing the ball from corner to corner will make it harder for him to take cracks at the ball and take control of the rally.. in order for him to take control he'll have to place the ball deep and away from you on the run, increasing the probability of him making an error. If you have a consistent second serve, don't be afraid to go for a little more on the first serve.. that's the reason why you're given two serves in the first place... Just, you know, use your common sense and play your game.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2007
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  3. Elyod Nanoc

    Elyod Nanoc New User

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    hit different balls(lobs, slices, drop shots, ect.), move in more, and watch out for slow shots that pop up and hit winners off these or hit forecful shots and approach
     
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  4. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    1) GET YOUR ASTHMA UNDER CONTROL! If you are having problems with your asthma while playing tennis it could be dangerous to you. You should have a rescue inhaler and there are longer term medicines which will help prevent exercise-induced asthma. My grandmother and also the mother of one of my son's friends died from asthma attacks - neither were very old. You need to take it seriously.

    2) As far as tennis is concerned- with two grinders, it usually comes down to who is mentally stronger - and that is often determined by who is in better shape physically. The saying is something like, "fatigue makes cowards of us all."
     
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  5. Gee Willikers Batman!

    Gee Willikers Batman! Professional

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    I asked a question. If your going to say I have excuses for losing then leave the thread. What is with people on TTW. I didn't include the part where I pulled my lower thigh muscle did I? I didn't say "Oh I was just playing bad today!" "Oh my racket is strung at a bad tension" like others do. I asked a simple question, what do you do if your playing someone consistent and your consistent as well. If your not going to be nice, GTFO.
     
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  6. Seifersquall1

    Seifersquall1 Rookie

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    You need an inhaler during games to get your asthma under control. And if you don't like to rally 10-15 balls a lot, then go for a few winners by ripping the ball in angles. If they are usually out, try to aim two meters behind the baseline. The ball wil likey be on the line.
     
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  7. tbini87

    tbini87 Hall of Fame

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    how do most of your rallies end? must be an error because you said neither of you hit winners. do you ever try to get to the net? maybe being able to put a little pressure on him will make him less consistent and give you a small edge. other than that just don't be the one to make an error.
     
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  8. Gee Willikers Batman!

    Gee Willikers Batman! Professional

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    By the way, I lost 2-8 in a Pro Set (we play 8 game pro sets for school, I dont know why). To be honest, even IF I DIDN'T cramp and I had my asthma under full control, I still would have lost 4-8 5-8, Lol.

    And, my rallies end in, yes errors, my volleys are at a way higher level then his volleys so I would serve and volley and come to the net often and I ALWAYS won net points, but after my lower thigh cramping, I could not run up to the net much because after he knew I liked to S&V, he lobbed me, and after my muscle pulling, I could not run efficiently lol.
     
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  9. Tennis_Monk

    Tennis_Monk Hall of Fame

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    my 1 cent. You got to believe in you that you are going to win. This is the most important aspect (iam not implying anything here btw).

    From the brief description given, it looks like your Forehand to his backhand is better match up than your forehand against his Killer forehand.

    How much control yu have on your serve?. if you can place it well, 60 mph should get you some cheap points.

    If both cant winner and both are consistent, there will be long rallies. Since you have a health condition, long rallies dont work to your advantage. WHich means you have to force and take chances early in the point against opponents backhand.
     
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  10. Shashwat

    Shashwat Semi-Pro

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    Make the points short. Hit approach shots and rush to the net to finish the point. Set yourself up. If your volleys suck, there's nothing you can do other than grinding out each point.
     
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  11. Bottle Rocket

    Bottle Rocket Hall of Fame

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    I completely agree with Ubel and I didn't think he was being mean.

    You've got the wrong attitude. If you go into it with the type of mindset of "There isn't anything I can do", you've basically beaten yourself before the match even starts. You've lowered the bar for yourself and are already prepared for the loss. Its a self fullfilling prophecy.

    The whole point of this game, in general, is to get a competitive match. It sounds like that is what you're going to get.

    I also don't understand why you're putting such an emphasize on serve speed, especially when you claim your opponents is sometimes only 10 mph faster than yours. That is another issue though.

    Anyway, the bottom line is that if you're playing someone with mediocre volleys, make them volley. Make them uncomfortable. Force them up into the court. Make them hit volleys and take them out of their comfort zone. If they make a few good ones, forget about it and stick with your game plan. You say he has a killer forehand. Is it still a killer forehand when you're at the net putting pressure on him?

    And don't hit to his killer forehand, unless you hit a very penetrating ball or some sort of skidding slice where he can't dictate play with it. Unless you have no fear of his forehand, stay away from it.

    Other than that, you've basically said you guys are very similar players. He has a better serve and a better forehand, so be realistic in this match. You're going to have to take your chances.

    The post below mine by thehustler is a great post, but we sort of disagree as far as taking chances goes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2007
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  12. thehustler

    thehustler Rookie

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    Go after the weakness

    A couple things. One thing someone said above, you have to believe you're going to win. I'm not the biggest strongest guy on the court typically, but I'm fast, I get everything back and I never give up. That has won me more matches and frustrated more people than anything. I believe that no matter who I play, no matter their reputation, that in the end they'll wonder what happened and how some guy who tracks everything down and just gets balls back in the right spot beat them. It's fun when you believe and don't give up.

    If your opponent has a 'killer' forehand and a consistent backhand, well go to the backhand. I've played people like this and I would direct all my shots to their backhand. Sure they'd get a few backhands over, but after time it breaks down and they start to miss. Once it starts to break down I throw in an occasional forehand to them. Why? Because they're going to be so excited to see a forehand that they'll over hit on it and generate an error. I also make sure to hit with plenty of topspin and mix up my depth and spins as well. Don't give anybody a rhythm. Hit a few slices nice and low. Hit a deep topspin near the baseline. Hit a short skidding ball near the service line. Throw in a high floater that lands deep. Give them nothing to groove their strokes on and watch the errors pile up. They become so frustrated that they can't get a pattern going that they'll try to force shots and it will just backfire. It's mean and it's vicious, but it sure is fun. Good luck out there.
     
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  13. Trinity TC

    Trinity TC Semi-Pro

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    Are you hitting the ball on the rise and in the process cutting a few precious split seconds from his reaction time? It's quite easy to do if you aren't already doing it.

    You want to have the sensation of being one step ahead of your opponent by moving 12"-18" closer to the net and hitting the ball a little earlier in the bounce. You don't want to feel like you're even with your consistent opponent and just trading groundstrokes.

    Moving in slightly to hit your groundstrokes will keep you from exhausting yourself on the court as you can generate more power, spin and angles as well as push your opponent back on his heels a bit...with much less effort and less running from side to side because you will be naturally cuttting off the angle on his groundstrokes.
     
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  14. ubel

    ubel Professional

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    Thank you, I was trying to be stern and not mean.. Hard to convey such emotions through text.. maybe next time I'll use more emoticons :) And yes, you hit the nail on the head about the correct mindset! You go into a match feeling like you're at a disadvantage, then you're mentally blocking yourself from performing as well as you can.
     
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  15. Tennis_Monk

    Tennis_Monk Hall of Fame

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    Between two consistent players, The player who played big points better wins (This could be you or the opponent with killer forehand). All the strategies indicated above are just that...Good strategies. Their effectiveness lies in how you execute them. Also dont underestimate the opponent. He probably can see some of your strategies and devise some counter tactics. That is when Tennis gets real fun and interesting.
     
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  16. Bagumbawalla

    Bagumbawalla Hall of Fame

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    Say, for example, the 2 of you are exactly equally consistant.

    OK, then what are some things that can make the difference.

    1, As mentioned above, mental (and physical) toughness. Whoever can grind out one more point than the other is going to win.

    2, Tennis sense- not just hitting the ball back, but hitting each ball back to a particulat spot for a particular purpous-- strategy/game plan-- setting up points.

    3, The ability to vary ones shots and force the other to hit a variety of spins and pace (change-ups) so he/she does not groove to your strokes.

    4, Being observant and taking advantage of weaknesses in the opponent's game.

    5, Over the long run, the ability/willingness to work on ones own game and gradually build it up-- gain more options.

    Good luck,

    B
     
    #16
  17. surfryder

    surfryder New User

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    GWB...one thing i can tell you is GET YOUR KICK SERVE DOWN!!! my tennis buddy hates my kick serve as a lefty, on either side, because if i catch him sitting wayy wide expecting it, ill toss a topspin or flat down the center, and on the other side i try to kick out wayy wide and make him uncomfortable on his backhand side, by trying to kick it into his body...if he moves out wide there, then down the middle again.

    hit forehand to his backhand OFTEN...thats usually a cross shot for you, so its a high percentage shot...when he goes for a down the line, backhand slice down the line, since thats high percentage too...then expect him to hit your forehand again...this time step in about three steps as he is starting his swing, and catch it before the bounce at mid court, and toss a sharp angle low.

    my kick is usually around 85mph or so, and my flat serve is around 100ish...the main difference between them is the body twist i have and rotation of the hips...hide what serve you do, because i must have aced him around 13 times beating him 6-4 6-3
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2007
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  18. TENNIS_IS_FUN

    TENNIS_IS_FUN Professional

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    When i know that my opponent is just better than me, i obviously don't play the way i normally do (leads to a loss), but try something different. Against a player that i feel totally outclasses me, i do something out of the ordinary, like serve and volley 90% of the time, or chip and charge 90% of the time. Be agressive...against someone who is better than you at just about everything, if you go into a rally with him you'll probably lose. Try to end the points, volley ALOT, serve hard, and belive you can win. (Feels like i'm talking to Roddick)
     
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  19. Gee Willikers Batman!

    Gee Willikers Batman! Professional

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    Thanks for the info guys.

    And, to ubel, it sounded like you were attacking me, so if you weren't, my apologies.
     
    #19

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