Cortex does it work for Tennis Elbow

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by rocky b, Aug 12, 2007.

  1. rocky b

    rocky b Guest

    Have had bad case of TE using the PK 7g looking to switch do you think the cortex is arm friendly and which babolot with cortex would be the best. The new aero storm has some nice weight with the cortex seems like a good choice what do you think.
     
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  2. rosenstar

    rosenstar Professional

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    might make it better... if you have tennis elbow it's either because you haven't strengthened your forearm, or you have bad technique, so the racquets not the problem
     
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  3. Leon22

    Leon22 Semi-Pro

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    The cortex does help dampen the feel of the ball, which is good for the arm...

    However, at least from what I learned when researching the Babolats, most of them are pretty stiff especially the ones with cortex. So I wouldn't recommend them for someone with arm problems already.
     
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  4. samster

    samster Legend

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    I think the type of string you use makes a big difference. I tried these strings in my Aeropro Drive Cortex.

    Polyfibre Premium Hi-tech = elbow and shoulder pain.

    Babolat VS Team = no pain.
     
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  5. Gantz

    Gantz Rookie

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    i'd just get a more flexible racket, a fischer would do nicely.
     
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  6. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    I've hit with PDR and PD oversize, both with cortex, and found them both pretty rough on the elbow.
     
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  7. cortex helps abit but not much. if u really like the PD tho, u could try to string it with something very soft (i.e natural gut).
    the pure storm looks like a good alternative tho (new or old version)
     
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  8. Dave M

    Dave M Hall of Fame

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    If you are already having elbow problems stay away from the Pure drives with or without cortex.I switched to a ksix one team and it's so much more friendly on the arm even with stiffer/higher tensioned strings than the PD.
     
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  9. vxb

    vxb New User

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    I had pad pain with PDR but PD with Cortex was absolutely fine.
     
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  10. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    PK 7G is supposed to be one of the most arm-friendly racquets out there. So you can either rest your arm for a while (which I highly recommend), or look at other areas where you can make substantial changes, e.g. change strings to natural gut or very soft multis, wrap an extra overgrip, get your technique checked out, etc.
     
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  11. MaximRecoil

    MaximRecoil Rookie

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    What is "Cortex" anyway? It just looks like a stylized piece of rubber wrapped around the base of the throat to me.
     
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  12. Gantz

    Gantz Rookie

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    it's really some kind of weight built inside of the racket throat. i'm assuming it costs around $6, from the price differences of APD and APC.
     
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  13. meh

    meh Semi-Pro

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    If the PK 7G is giving you problems, you're not going to find relief from any Babolat. Change your string.
     
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  14. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    [​IMG]

    Cortex

    Babolat's Cortex shaft vibration dampening system is designed to offer greater comfort during play. Available in two versions, the Cortex system used in the Pure series of racquets reduces harmful racquet vibrations without filtering out the feedback required for feel. The result of filtering unnecessary vibrations results in what Babolat calls a "pure feel." The Cortex system used in other Babolat racquets filters and dampens for maximum comfort.

    Note: Cortex will not block negative Che.

    -SF
     
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  15. haerdalis

    haerdalis Hall of Fame

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    Yeah if the 7g is giving you problems than you are probably best of taking a break to heal.
     
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  16. rocky b

    rocky b Guest

    The 7g does not hurt I just want to change because I never served well with the 7g but most important I want to be pain free what other racket would you guys pick for me. It needs to be 11.7oz and over and 98 head to 100
     
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  17. AJK1

    AJK1 Hall of Fame

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    As others have said, the PK 7g is renowned as one of the best for TE, so you've either got technique problems or your string tension is too tight/stiff. I would suggest having a lesson and getting your technique observed for any possible defects.
     
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  18. rocky b

    rocky b Guest

    MY arm has not hurt in 8 years I just want to switch rackets to something that is very arm freindly. I guess on this board if something hurts your stokes are the problem.
     
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  19. Puffdaddy

    Puffdaddy New User

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    I understand and agree with your frustration.

    My own personal experience has been that ice, rest and non-steroidal anti-inflamatories have helped.

    Regarding the racquet change - I personally would try a softer string at a lower tension first. If you have an arm problem, switching racquets is going to be very frustrating. You may feel better in the short-run, but it'll take time to get your game suited to the new racquet.

    Regarding your specific question about the Cortex system - I personally think it offers a softer feel than the non-Cortex Babolats, but I wouldn't exactly call that line arm-friendly. (I played for a few months with the PD Roddick w/Cortex)

    If I were you, I'd demo some of the Volkls, specifically the C10, Tour 10 V-Engine (good price, like your own), and the DNX 10.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2007
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  20. haerdalis

    haerdalis Hall of Fame

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    The kneissl black star has the best combination of comfort control and power in any racquet I have tried.
     
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  21. timsims

    timsims New User

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    If the tennis elbow is your primary issue, here's another huge vote for REST and then workout your arms and forearms in the gym. Come back with the 7G or a 5G with multifilament strings strung in the mid-50s.

    If you're just wanting a new racquet, I'd recommend staying with a racquet that weighs at least 315 grams, is head light, and has a flex rating of 65 or lower.
     
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  22. AJK1

    AJK1 Hall of Fame

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    Well, indeed, what i say may not be as stupid as you think, as TE can sometimes take years to surface.
    It took 4 years for mine to surface.
    So it could be your technique after all. I went to a coach and he corrected things i was doing badly for years.
    Also, using an extended length racquet is murder for TE, so i would suggest resting your arm, then trying out some standard length racquets.
    If you don't, you've only got yourself to blame.
    I know, i had TE so bad i had to have an operation on my elbow to fix it.
    And it still twitches from time to time.
     
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  23. drfredc

    drfredc New User

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    The APDC works fine for preventing tennis elbow. However, the reason is probably more related to the style of play it promotes than anything else.

    The light swing weight of the APDC promotes use of topspin shots which tend to be easy on joints. The top spin shot takes the impact with the joints and muscles in various positions, so the force of the impact is spread around between various joints, joint parts, muscles and tendons. When one hits a lot of flat shots, one part of the elbow joint takes a lot of abuse as it's generally a fixed hinge in a repeating position. This can promote development of tennis elbow.

    In other words, it doesn't much matter what racquet you get if you're prone to tennis elbow problems. If you don't change the style of your hitting and play, you're likely to end up with more of the same problem regardless of racquet used. Softer strings might help this a bit, but only a bit.

    To really fix a tennis elbow problem requires rethinking and retooling your game away from shot styles that promote the problem. Lighter weight racquets tend to promote more topspin shots -- less tennis elbow. Yes, this retooling means for a while your game will probably struggle, but you'll get over it as new techniques open new opportunities for winners and keeping rallies going. At least that's my experience (56 years old), level 4 player.
     
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  24. Bundey

    Bundey Professional

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    Look at my setup in my signature, no arm pain with that.
     
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