Could/should I? too late 2hbh ?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by bluegrasser, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    Ok, I'm 51, overweight, out of shape, with a solid 4.5 forehand and a 3.0 bhnd, but for yrs I've entertained the thought of trying a two hander, but every time I've tried and had a few lessons it felt like both hands were working against each other,so i didn't pursue. I've had discussions with various pros and they basically parroted " too late old man", so another yr
    goes by. I'm not a big strong guy ( 5'9" weight = we won't go there) and I've always wanted my backhand at least to cause some concern to my opponent, instead of my wuss defensive slice.

    I have a friend who's willing to hit three to four times weekly this summer, and my thought was, I start by hitting left handed forehands, and then add the right hand until it felt natural, and hopefully by the end of summer I'll have it in the pocket - am I dreaming, or should I be satisfied with the game as is ? is the lack of reach too demanding at this stage in the game, extra footwork ? opinions please.
     
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  2. Bolt

    Bolt Rookie

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    I recently committed myself to using two hands off both sides after playing for nearly 15 years (on and off) with one handed strokes. Strangely, I've always been able to hit killer two-handed forehands but two-handed backhands have never been easy. You are spot on about the feeling that both hands are working against each other. To me, it feels like my brain and right arm are fighting each other. The right arm wants to control the action but my brain thinks the left arm should be in charge. This is especially true when the pressure is on and instinct kicks in. Conversely, my instinct on the forehand has always been to use two hands.

    I hope by the end of the summer I have my backhand about on par with my forehand.
     
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  3. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    Interesting Bolt, I'd say ditto, as hitting a two handed forehand seems more natural, but my 1hnder is plenty good on that side.
     
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  4. badmice2

    badmice2 Rookie

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    i had a similar but different switch...

    I had a 2hbh since i was 14 yrs old; due to a wrist injury on my left hand i was forced to learn a 1 hander. For the first month or 2, I had to hit against the wall and against some lower rated but consistant hitters to get my timing down and correct my technique. I took my about 3-4 months to get the control and power down.

    I will say this, if you have your technicial fundmentals down and understand what it takes to switch to a 2 hander (i.e. re-learning contact points, swing patch, hitting stands, movement to the ball, etc) and have the time and patience to do it than i would say yes and give it a shot. If not, i would say learn to hit flat or topspin backhand.
     
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  5. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    Come on BB, other pros, give this old fart some advise - Is it too late and futile to switch to a 2hnd, can it be done , or should I be content with the 1hnd and try to improve. If yes on the 2hnd, then what should be the plan, or rather how to work the plan. thanks
     
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  6. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Why don't you just add the top spin and drive shots to the 1 H BH slice you have already? I had to make a conscious effort to do that, and now I prefer it to the slice. My natural motion at first was always the slice, coming from a table tennis background. Now it is the (admittedly not good) top spin.
     
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  7. cak

    cak Professional

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    I started with a one handed back hand in high school. I learned a 2HBD at the age of 45. (My one handed slice on hard serves was exasterbating my tennis elbow.) I can be done if you want to bad enough.
     
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  8. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    Suresh - I've tried but keep mis/hitting (tp)

    dak -Two Q's: Did your level drop in the learning process, also what is your present level. 2) How long (hrs,days,months) did the switch take where it was in the pocket.
     
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  9. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Don't switch, just improve your one hander. If you're only slicing from the bh side, you're leaving yourself vulnerable to get attacked there. Learn how to drive from the backhand and mix in the slice once in a while, but stop slicing exclusively. Instead of following through with your palm down, drive through with the head in the same position and consciously do not pronate at all.
     
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  10. cak

    cak Professional

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    I had it down in about 3 months, at which point I fell on the tennis court and broke my left arm. After the 8 weeks in a cast, it took me another 3 months to get a consistant enough back hand to use in USTA league play (note, your one hander doesn't go away, it's there if you need it...) I play 4 to 5 times a week socially, and would only use the two handed backhand in those games. At about a year it became a real weapon, much stronger than my slice. Just recently one of the ladies I play with mentioned she had started serving to my backhand when I first used the two hander, and she hasn't gotten out of the habit, and it's really biting her now as my backhand return is harder than my forehand.
     
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  11. gully

    gully Semi-Pro

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    BG, I play a 4.5 game and got by on the slice until my mid-30s, playing all chip-and-charge and serve-and-volley. I learned both a flat drive and a topspin one-hander, eventually. I don't know if the whole process is complete, but it took a few years to get comfortable using both in matches, and a couple more before I could win points outright with either. But that's okay -- some things take longer than others. And to be honest, I think my slice is stronger than it used to be....

    In any case, I'm not sure I see the rationale for the two-hander. Why not work on the drive and topspin to add to your one-handed arsenal? Since (I assume) you take the racket back with your left hand near the throat for your slice, why not keep this preparation the same and use it to change your grip to drive or brush the ball?
     
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  12. travlerajm

    travlerajm Hall of Fame

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    Hi, I'm a 5.0 with a 6.0 2hb and 4.5 forehand. Everyone at my club always comes to me when they want to learn a 2hb.

    I've had good luck teaching old guys to hit 2-handers from scratch. I believe the key to the 2-hander is the footwork and weight transfer. If you focus on always getting your back foot planted in the correct place so that you can step directly toward your target, you'll be able to hit decent 2hb's even if the arm coordination is a little off. I also recommend focusing on extending the left hand through the ball and letting your righthand help just for stability.
     
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  13. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    travlerajm: What drills should I work on to start, should I have a friend at the net and feed me a bucket of balls, and then slowly move back, or hit against a wall, in other words, how would you teach me from scratch.thanks
     
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  14. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    I don't think your too old but weight "could" be a consideration. Often players with a little "extra" pounds have trouble reaching effectively for a
    2hbh. If this isn't a problem, there is no reason why you can't learn the stroke and actually its quite easy to master. Basically its a left handed forehand with the right hand going along for the ride. Couple of nice things about the stroke is that you can use an open stance and have a greater margin for error in making the shot.

    You know sometimes, actually more than many of us would like to think, pros shy away from certain strokes because they don't use them and/or don't care to look bad in front of people.

    One consideration you might think about though is what type of game your intending to play - singles/doubles. I think the one big disadvantage of the
    2hbh is its limitations in doubles where the majority of shots are made inside the baseline. Again, its my conclusion that a 1hbh is a spec faster - reaction time, although I've played against some very good players who use both hands. Some who use both hands on both wings.

    I just think you can either get someone to feed you balls (or use a ball machine) at a very slow pace and get the action down - its not that hard. As you progress, pick up the speed gradually and you'll get it quickly - might take an hour or two but in most respects its much easier than a 1hbh.
     
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  15. tennis_nerd22

    tennis_nerd22 Hall of Fame

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    bluegrasser, are you sure you cant develop a solid 1HB? that might be easier, but if you really want to, try and learn a 2HB. i use a 1HB lob but a regular 2HBH. i used to play baseball when i was younger, like 8 or 9 (im 15 now), so it might've helped
     
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  16. travlerajm

    travlerajm Hall of Fame

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    The bucket of balls approach, or even a ball machine, is not a bad idea.

    As I said, getting the habit of always setting up so your stance is square to your target is the highest priority. The 2-hander is unique compared to a fh or 1hb, because with fh or 1hb, it's still possible to hit decent shots with lazy footwork.
    People debate the merits of the open-stance forehand, but there is really no such thing as a good open-stance 2-hander.

    And similarly, it's possible to hit a decent 1hb with a closed stance (albeit more difficult). A close-stance 2-hander just doesn't work. The reason is because moreso than with any other shot, the 2hb is a full-body shot. Almost all of the power comes from stepping forward toward the target, then letting the body rotate into the shot.

    Here's a couple of more tips that might help:

    1. The 2hb works well with a compact backswing. So I recommend starting the stroke with the left elbow tucked close to the body. As you begin to rotate into the shot, extend the left arm forward away from you so that your racquet faces moves in a straight line toward your target.

    2. Wherever your contact point is now, it's probably too far back! I can't tell you how many 2hbs I fixed just by getting people to hit the ball further out in front. The people with great 2hbs make contact a lot farther out in front than might feel right for you at first. But please trust me, it will pay off if you can develop the habit of really reaching forward and taking the ball early. I'd estimate that the average 3.5-4.0 player hits his backhanded 6-8 behind his ideal contact point.

    3. I recommend an eastern grip with the left hand. This is the easiest to learn. And in the last 5 years I've seen a lot of juniors who for some reason have a strong semiwestern grip on their left hand. Every one of them has a crappy backhand. And every junior I see that learned with an eastern grip eventually develops the 2hb into a nice weapon. I wouldn't worry about hitting heavy topspin at first -- since the 2hb works best with a compact backswing, a flatter trajectory will give you the most consistency.

    4. I'd suggest using a righthand grip that doesn't impede the foreward extension of your left arm (i.e., if you have an eastern forehand, you'll need to slide it over to continental so that you don't have to torque your right wrist awkwardly). I wouldn't go all the way to your normal 1hb grip, because I think this will just tempt you to use too much right hand. A key to switching from a 1hb to a 2hb is that you need to tell your right hand to swallow its pride and let the left hand do the work. Of course, there are 2hbs out there that incorporate a lot of right hand (Agassi, Courier) but I'd say these are exceptions, and I've never seen anyone develop a decent Agassi-straight-arm 2hb that didn't start using it as a toddler.

    I hope this helps. It's never too late!
     
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  17. travlerajm

    travlerajm Hall of Fame

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    The bucket of balls approach, or even a ball machine, is not a bad idea.

    As I said, getting the habit of always setting up so your stance is square to your target is the highest priority. The 2-hander is unique compared to a fh or 1hb, because with fh or 1hb, it's still possible to hit decent shots with lazy footwork.
    People debate the merits of the open-stance forehand, but there is really no such thing as a good open-stance 2-hander.

    And similarly, it's possible to hit a decent 1hb with a closed stance (albeit more difficult). A close-stance 2-hander just doesn't work. The reason is because moreso than with any other shot, the 2hb is a full-body shot. Almost all of the power comes from stepping forward toward the target, then letting the body rotate into the shot.

    Here's a couple of more tips that might help:

    1. The 2hb works well with a compact backswing. So I recommend starting the stroke with the left elbow tucked close to the body. As you begin to rotate into the shot, extend the left arm forward away from you so that your racquet faces moves in a straight line toward your target.

    2. Wherever your contact point is now, it's probably too far back! I can't tell you how many 2hbs I fixed just by getting people to hit the ball further out in front. The people with great 2hbs make contact a lot farther out in front than might feel right for you at first. But please trust me, it will pay off if you can develop the habit of really reaching forward and taking the ball early. I'd estimate that the average 3.5-4.0 player hits his backhanded 6-8 behind his ideal contact point.

    3. I recommend an eastern grip with the left hand. This is the easiest to learn. And in the last 5 years I've seen a lot of juniors who for some reason have a strong semiwestern grip on their left hand. Every one of them has a crappy backhand. And every junior I see that learned with an eastern grip eventually develops the 2hb into a nice weapon. I wouldn't worry about hitting heavy topspin at first -- since the 2hb works best with a compact backswing, a flatter trajectory will give you the most consistency.

    4. I'd suggest using a righthand grip that doesn't impede the forward extension of your left arm (i.e., if you have an eastern forehand, you'll need to slide it over to continental so that you don't have to torque your right wrist awkwardly). I wouldn't go all the way to your normal 1hb grip, because I think this will just tempt you to use too much right hand. A key to switching from a 1hb to a 2hb is that you need to tell your right hand to swallow its pride and let the left hand do the work. Of course, there are 2hbs out there that incorporate a lot of right hand (Agassi, Courier) but I'd say these are exceptions, and I've never seen anyone develop a decent Agassi-straight-arm 2hb that didn't start using it as a toddler.

    I hope this helps. It's never too late!
     
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  18. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    That is BS that it is too late to hit a twohander. You simply have to:

    1. Relax your arms

    2. Learn to not step across your body and block your hips.

    3. Learn to hit your twohander mainly from a neutral stance (lack of conditioning might hurt you here, but it is also probably hurting your onehander as well)

    4. Use your chin to notify yourself that you rotated your shoulders properly

    5. Hit lots of lefthanded forehands to build coordination, strength, stamina, and feeling the tophand in control. This is one of the biggest reasons people feel like their hands are fighting each other. The bottomhand wants and is trying to take control, and the tophand is too passive and "thinks" it needs to take control.

    6. The fastest way to improve your whole game as well as your backhand is by getting in shape.

    My game has dropped significantly since being out of shape. It is the key reason that my backhand (both onehanded and twohanded) has dropped off the radar. The backhand for me is the first to go south when I am out of shape. It just sucks. I usually end up slicing a lot.

    For the onehander, conditioning plays a vital role to prepare early. For the twohander, conditioning plays a vital role to maintain balance.
     
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  19. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    Thanks travler, B Bill,others - I had one lesson last year and all the pro was saying,"good job, nice hit,' and I was hitting like sh#t, i felt like saying this is boot camp man, don't lie to me, tell me like it is.The problem is finding the right pro + it's expensive for this blue collar guy, maybe I should move to Idaho :O
    B Bill what do you think of the grips for the 2hnder ?
     
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  20. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Give yourself more time by stepping back and hitting open stance off the back foot at first. Once that is comfortable, then you can try to take it on the rise and off the front foot. It will be a defensive stroke before it becomes offensive. And it will be more like a powerful block rather than topspin at first. The key is to hit it many times to get the hang of it and remove the fear. Keeping a lot of net clearance also helps. So the balls will be high and deep at first without much spin. Then they will improve.
     
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  21. tennis_nerd22

    tennis_nerd22 Hall of Fame

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    travlerajm, do you think its ok to use an eastern forehand grip for the bottom hand of a 2HBH? because thats what i use, even though everyone says to use continental. i cant hit a 2HBH for sh*t with a continental on the bottom hand. whats your take on that?
     
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  22. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Who is saying this? Bottom hand is the one closest to the strings or the left hand if your RH.
     
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  23. tennis_nerd22

    tennis_nerd22 Hall of Fame

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    oops i meant top hand then. my bad, sry :rolleyes:

    (so if im right handed, my right hand for the 2HBH would be in an eastern FH grip)

    my left hand would be a semi western left handed forehand grip for the top hand
     
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  24. travlerajm

    travlerajm Hall of Fame

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    I've seen a few people with decent backhands using an eastern forehand grip for the bottom hand, but even these people always have trouble flattening it out and hitting the penetrating DTL shot. Not surprisingly, you don't see very many pros who use that grip. Michael Chang did, but his backhand was definitely a weakness, and at the end of his career everyone picked on it pretty easily when he couldn't run around it anymore. All he could do was loop it, but he couldn't use it as a weapon.

    The reason you rarely see people develop good 2-handers with this grip is because the grip prevents you from extending fully through the shot. It's not possible to extend the left arm fully out in front because the right hand is on the front of the grip, so the right arm isn't long enough to reach all the way around. And if you were to try to extend the left arm while using this grip, you'd have to torque your right wrist awkwardly, which would be painful.

    The inabilility to fully straighten the left arm means that the hitting window (the portion of the stroke where the racquet is going forward in a straight line toward the target) will have to be shorter. Just like with any type of groundstroke, the players with the best 2-handers are the ones with the longest hitting windows in their strokes.

    In contrast, the continental righthand allows the right hand to be positioned so that the angle between the forearm and the racquet is more natural, and your right arm will be able to reach just as far forward as your left arm, allowing the maximum length hitting window.

    Even though I haven't seen you hit, I can tell you from my teaching experience that there's a very good chance that your contact point on your bh is about 6 inches further back (later) than your ideal contact point. But without making the grip change, there won't be any room in your stroke to move the contact point further forward. Your bottom hand grip is probably causing you to pull up and across immediately after contact, making your margin for error small.

    So it sounds like a grip change might be a good idea for you. The grip change will let you practice swinging with full extension, giving you a lot longer hitting window. And by moving your contact point forward, your shots will still go where you want even if your timing is late, because the contact point will still be within the hitting window.
     
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  25. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    What is the exact issue with you backhand? not enough spin, cannot finish

    through? lack of control? Could you inform me of what the issue is?
     
    #25
  26. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    The most popular grips and for good reason are:

    1. Top hand (eastern forehand) and Bottom hand (Continental) or

    2. Top hand (semi-western forehand) and Bottom hand (Continental)

    Yeah, I hate when coaches blow smoke. You should be in their working. If you are not working to get better, you won't get better.
     
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  27. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    Thanks all, I'll put this in the mindset and hopefully it'll be warm enough this week to hit some outside. I'll give it a go and see if it will be an advantage ,and if not, back to the slice.
     
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  28. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Travlerajm,

    This is not true. It is a myth that players with onehanded backhands can get away with lazy footwork and still hit a onehander well.

    If this were the case, the poster being out of shape would not have issues hitting a onehander. I think if you are going to teach tennis at least understand that ALL strokes place a demand on good footwork.

    In actuality, the onehanded backhand needs excellent footwork so that the weight transfer goes into to the ball instead of away from it. Plus, earlier preparation places more demand on a onehanded backhand player to execute their footwork.

    Again, this is not true!!!! The twohanded backhand CAN hit from a closed stance and there is plenty of clips proving this. The key to the closed stance is to not step across too much sideways where you block your hips. It is the hips that need to be able to get into the shot for the twohander.

    A twohanded backhand can and will always be able to hit well from ALL stances. I would agree with you that if a player can hit from a neutral or forward stance they should but in tennis this isn't always the case.

    You are correct about the elbow but the bottom hand elbow also stays close to the body and is the pivoting elbow for the arms. Depending on the type of twohander (straight arm or bent arm) pivoting happens either at contact (or slightly thereof) or slightly before contact. Watch Hewitt http://www.uspta.com/html/e-lesson-twohand%20backhand.swf

    The contact point for the twohander is based on the back arm. In an eastern forehand grip, the contact point will be similar to the Eastern forehand grip. Having a player learn to hit a twohanded backhand too far in front (and who is out of shape) is a recipe for a bad habit of lunging and turning the wrists upward.

    The contact point a player should master for the twohanded backhand (tophand Eastern) is the contact point where the ball arrives between the front knee and the front hip from a parallel persective. The front hip is not considered hitting late. From an angular perspective a player wants to develop making contact with his body plane facing the 45 degree angle. That is what hitting in front means!

    Watch Hewitt but this time watch the second sequence (the contact sequence.)

    http://www.uspta.com/html/e-lesson-twohand%20backhand.swf

    As a player gets better and masters that contact area, then they can go out a little more. Otherwise, twohanders will overrotate and could fall into a bad habit. The bodies powerzone is ALWAYS between the feet. The trick in tennis is to bring it in just enough.

    Well Eastern is fine but the SW is also a very good grip. As far as your statistical information - that is your own limited opinion and is not true in the grand scheme of things. There are many players that also can hit a good ball with an SW tophand. It all depends on their swing path and how they were taught.

    I dont know where you are getting your information from but I am having trouble swallowing it. I think it is best if you just give your tip instead of your own preferences and stastical information.

    The trouble with "coaches" these days is they are not well rounded in the many ways to teach a stroke. They usually teach what "works" for them. First, I would disagree with your analysis that Andre incorporates a lot of "right hand" in his stroke. In fact, it is quite the opposite. For years, Andre's twohanded backhand has been the model. This is because he uses the classic Eastern forehand/continental combo and powers through his shot with the tophand and not the bottom hand!!! This is very evident by the extension he gets in his stroke.

    While I would agree with you that moving to an Full Eastern backhand grip (for the bottom hand) will strengthen the bottom hands role, for some players this is exactly what they need to develop a good backhand.

    Also, it is not "pride" for the bottom hand to release its control, it is the brains response to what it is familiar doing. It is simply a signal that fires certain muscles when the eyes see the ball in a certain way. It is also about developing the weaker more uncoordinated side of the body so that it becomes more dominant, able to transfer weight properly, and stay in balance.

    The keys to a twohanded backhand (both straight arm and bent arm and all the grips) are:

    1. RELAXED ARMS!!!!

    2. Rotate the shoulders so they BOTH touch the chin

    3. Make contact with your body facing the 45 degree angle

    4. Make contact with the ball around the front hip area.

    5. Step into the ball if using a more closed stance (do not step across to send your wieight towards the side fence or block your hips)

    6. Keep your head still at contact and do not pull it away with your rotation.

    7. Back foot needs to take control so the arms stay relaxed.

    8. Knees have to be bent allowing the body to swivel or rotate properly.

    9. The tophand needs to be trained. It needs to be trained by hitting at least two months worth of a lefthanded forehands. A player needs to also develop his strength and coordination on the left leg. The first step towards the ball needs to be down with the inside foot (foot closest to the ball) and push off with the outside foot.

    10. Keep the hands semi-relaxed on the grips and swing from the torso. Let the arms follow and take the energy from the torso for relaxed rotation.

    11. Hit by using your torso muscles.
     
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  29. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    One other thing, is my current racquet ( fxp Prestige mp) good for the 2hnder, I love this stick otherwise.
     
    #29
  30. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    It is fine, just get out there and learn the things I gave you above.
     
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  31. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    10 -4 thanks
     
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  32. oldguysrule

    oldguysrule Semi-Pro

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    One more encouragement to an old dog learning new tricks...I am 47 and started hitting 2hbh last year against hard servers. I found the extra stability and short simple swing to be an advantage. When I had a little TE, I started using it on ground strokes. In the past, when I have tried it, it never worked for me. Last year though, I was watching my son and other juniors and noticed how relaxed they were on the follow through. This helped me more than anything else.

    Don't make it a big deal or think of it as a lot of work to master. For me, the two keys are: Think of it as a left handed forehand, and keep your arms very relaxed with an over the shoulder finish.

    Now I can use 2hbh on high balls, hard shots, and serve returns, and 1hbh for all the other shots. I really like having that versatility. The key for me was just to start doing it.
     
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  33. vin

    vin Professional

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    hey bluegrasser,

    I hit a one hander (both top and slice) and contemplating switching last year. I'm glad I didn't as I'm hitting it great right now. If you search, you might find some old threads with me asking about it.

    You're already accustomed to hitting a one handed drive, but are saying that you mishit. I think it would take a lot more work to start from scratch to develop a two hander than it would to improve your one hander. Maybe you just need to follow Blake's backhand improvement plan and just hit lots of 'em.

    If you decide to try the two hander, I recommend checking out Tennisplayer.net. John Yandell wrote a very in depth series of articles on the two hander and the different combinations of grips and arm dominance.

    Good luck!
     
    #33
  34. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Good point...sort of like throwing a sack of potatoes over your shoulder. Just be sure to go out some before coming back over. ;)
     
    #34
  35. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I honestly dont think BlueGrasser is going to solve his backhand woes by switching from one to the other or keeping his onehander until he fixes his conditioning issue. No feet, no backhand. :)
     
    #35
  36. bluegrasser

    bluegrasser Hall of Fame

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    Hey BB, give me a chance, I'm sure I'll lose some pounds with the extra footwork :)
     
    #36
  37. SCSI

    SCSI Rookie

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    One or Two hands, footwork is key. My guess is that with the effort that will take you to be comfortable with two-handed backhand, you can probably hit pretty decent one-handed backhand. My point is that there is no magic short cut to backhand issues... You just have to improve footwork and hit thousands of balls.
     
    #37
  38. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Very good post. Very intelligent.
     
    #38
  39. travlerajm

    travlerajm Hall of Fame

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    I think Bungalo just likes to argue for argument's sake. I find it amusing.
     
    #39
  40. SCSI

    SCSI Rookie

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    If you really want to try 2-handed backhand, I like the idea of playing left-handed for a while. That is what I did for some time, and it really helped me.


    Playing with a woman or someone who doesn't hit hard may help. I was able to play well enough to play competitively against a strong 3.5 female singles player, serving/volleying left-handed and all. Interestingly, I had no trouble hitting left-handed one-handed backhand, probably because I stopped trying to muscle the ball and just rotated my body.


    I found that it helped to just place my right hand without really gripping the racket on the grip. This also helps in transitioning to full two-handed backhand, as the range of motion is somewhat different when hitting with your dominant hand on the racket.


    Try hitting the fence from the other side of the fence and build the muscle and coordination with left hand or two-handed backhand and see how it feels. Also, get close to the net and try to roll many balls over with topspin to get the right feel for brushing up on the ball.


    One nice thing about going with two-hands would be that you won't have too much negative thoughts or confidence issues when hitting backhand under pressure from having mediocre backhand for years, like when your opponent rushes to the net and forces you to hit a good backhand pass at a crucial time.


    Plus, you don’t have to be real good with it either. You just have to able to keep the ball deep consistently and pass well enough with your backhand.


    What the hell. You live once. Give it go!
     
    #40
  41. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Actually I like to argue with people that make dumb comments and give dumb advice. ;)
     
    #41
  42. travlerajm

    travlerajm Hall of Fame

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    Right on cue.
     
    #42
  43. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    If the one-hander has frustrated you for this many years, then why not give the 2 hander a try. Hitting left-handed might be a nice way of easing into it while working on footwork and timing but you will want to get used to hitting with both hands on the racquet since it is different than just hitting a left-handed forehand since your left arm will be in much closer to your body unless you are going for a Hewitt style of backhand with arms extended. Give yourself a summer or two to get the hang of it and at least you have the forehand to fall back on.
     
    #43

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