could you help me, please?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by evakent, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. evakent

    evakent New User

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    Well, top o' the morning fellow TT'ers :) (it's not morning where I am, but I thought I'd lighten the mood and I've been waiting to use this expression around here for way too long)

    Anyway, me and my brother play tennis in a sort of recreational way and we thought that maybe we could buy a stringing machine, more for leisure than for necessity or for making money. Having this in mind, we considered several of the "cheapish" machines quoted here on the forum but unfortunately most of those do not ship to Europe or the shipping costs alone make it impossible for us to make that purchase. We found a viable alternative in the Pro's Pro Challenger 2 but had some concerns about quality..

    So we finally asked the big boss of our tennis club if he knew any way to help us and he said that he had an old dropweight machine (complete with the tool set) that he would sell us for 100€. The model is an older version of the one below.


    http://www.tennispro.fr/p9249/en/te...g-machines/cb-10en-pro-stringing-machine.html

    Could any of you give any opinion about this machine and if the price is fair? We are considering making a counter-offer of about 80€ so it would be settled somewhere between those values. Any comments, past experiencies, or anything you can add will be appreciated!

    thanks
     
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  2. evakent

    evakent New User

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    oops, I meant to post this on the "Stringing Machines" section. can anyone move it, please? thanks
     
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  3. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    moved, cheers! (and welcome)

    Any ideas what changes occurred between versions? The mounting system looks very similar to the Gamma mount, and it is a pretty decent mount. The tensioner looks to be ratcheting rotating drum, which I personally have a love/hate relationship with, but if you are stringing for leisure, it will be fine. I just don't like the extra string needed, but i'm pretty picky when it comes to machines.

    All in all, it looks like a very solid setup for a beginner to learn on. I'd want fixed clamps, but I wouldn't be complaining for the price. You can decide whether or not you want to upgrade down the road, and easily make your money back later.
     
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  4. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Welcome to the forum!

    100 euros is about $140 US dollars which is probably less than you would pay in the US for a new X-2 or Klippermate shipped. If you trust that the machine works properly then I think that is a reasonable deal for a machine that originally retailed for 249 euros.

    Maybe instead of asking him to come down on the price you could ask if he would throw in some string for free?
     
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  5. evakent

    evakent New User

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    yeah, that might be the answer. he also offered a two hour lesson on stringing so I might ask for some string to pratice and such. the machine is in very good condition, no rust at all and so it should work properly after a good clean up and oiling.

    In the future I can buy the fixed clamps as and add-on but I need to ask.. does it really make that much of a difference or is it just more practical with the fixed?

    thanks for the answers and the welcomes!
     
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  6. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    I just started stringing with a Prince Neos 1000 which has clamps attached to glide bars after using a Klippermate with flying clamps, which is similar to the machine you are considering, for the last 4 years.

    The first racquet I strung with the Neos was done at the same tension I'd used many times on the Klippermate but the stringbed felt much stiffer for some reason.

    When I posted a question about this on the forum I got the answer that the clamps used by the Neos will have a lot less give than the flying clamps used by the Klippermate and that will result in a stiffer stringbed being produced by the Neos at the same tension even though the Klippermate is a constant pull machine and the Neos uses a lockout crank. The explanation sounds reasonable to me anyway.

    I will say that is it much more convenient and faster to string with the Neos than it was with the Klippermate. I used to take about 40-50 minutes to string with the Klippermate and sometimes longer but I did my very first racquet on the Neos in 40 minutes which included reading the instructions. The next one only took a little more than 30 minutes.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2009
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  7. evakent

    evakent New User

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    from what I read, the big difference is that the flying clamps will let the string lose a little tension after you clamp them do to slippage. Is this correct? If I tension the string a little tighter then I can correct this?

    The time it takes to string the racquet isn't that big of a deal to me, since I'm just doing it for fun and can take the whole day if I want to :D so maybe in the future, if I start doing it for someone other than myself I might consider a change..
     
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  8. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Fixed clamps will make a big difference but you will find it difficult to add them on later. As a matter of fact you may find it impossible.

    Adding fixed clamps is like putting jet engines under the wings of a single propeller airplane.

    Irvin
     
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  9. evakent

    evakent New User

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  10. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Changing from a floating clamp stringer to a fixed clamp stringer for about $300 USD? Maybe in about 400 years when the evaluation of the dollar goes down.

    Irvin
     
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  11. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Let me give you an example. The difference between and Gamma Progression II with fixed and floating clamps is about $130 USD.

    Irvin
     
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  12. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    Sounds like a reasonable price to me. Since you are playing recreationally and not stringing for money don't bother with the fixed clamps.
     
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  13. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    It's not necessarily slippage, it's just that the string is using another string (relatively soft, pliable material compared to a metal base) as an anchor. This means that the strings can torque and twist. You could string a little bit tighter to "correct" for this, but it's really not the same thing. In terms of what you're trying to achieve, though, you could easily bump the tension until you find what works for you. Tension is just a reference number, your string bed stiffness is what is going to really matter to you on the court.

    It's not always so hard, but looking at the design of the turn table that was posted before, it COULD be hard with your machine, and the fixed clamp upgrade might be VERY, VERY expensive. In this case Irvin is probably right, but it's nto always so bad.

    The stringing lesson, provided he is proficient, and technically sound, is going to be a GREAT investment, especially for most people. I think you should try stringing a racquet once on your own, with a manual or videos, and THEN take the lesson, it'll probably be more valuable to you that way. If he's not a good stringer (he really has to know what he's talking about) a lesson could be bad, as you might pick up bad habits, etc early on. However, a lesson, and watching someone else stringing can really clear things up for many people.
     
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  14. evakent

    evakent New User

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    he's been doing this for many years, for many players. so the lesson is definitely a plus. I think I'm going for it. The only other alternative is the Pro's Pro Challenger II, which not only costs an extra 75, but it is also said to be a terrible quality machine..
     
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