Countries importing players to represent them...

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by topseed, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. topseed

    topseed Rookie

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    There are instances where a country look for imported players (wheter tennis, basketball or whatever sports) and naturalized them in order to be eligible to represent the country. Is that fair?

    Just wana know your thoughts on this practice.

    Peace!
     
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  2. rulin

    rulin New User

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    Didn't Britain try to do this with Djokovic?
     
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  3. nfor304

    nfor304 Banned

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    Didnt Cecil Mammit and Eric Taino represent the USA but now play for the Philippines?
     
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  4. Kegzz

    Kegzz Rookie

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    Qatar offered sportspeople highly paid deals to switch nationalities and participate in the Olympics for Qatar, so it's possible they offered this to tennis players.
     
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  5. topseed

    topseed Rookie

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    Is that fair? How do you think the "genuine" qatar athletes will feel knowing that they wont be getting a chance to crack the tournament bigtime?
     
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  6. deltox

    deltox Hall of Fame

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    fair or not its how it goes. an olympic gold medal to smaller countries is like the entire country winning the lottery at once. Its life altering for them.
     
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  7. darthpwner

    darthpwner Banned

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    If players had to play for the country they reside in, then Monte Carlo would be the tennis capital of the world, and Monaco would dominate Davis Cup
     
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  8. Kegzz

    Kegzz Rookie

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    I don't think it's fair, no. Chances are, after the Olympics, everyone would've stopped caring about this new sports star from another country. However, I don't know of any deals that were actually accepted. I think it would take an idiot to do it.
     
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  9. jamesblakefan#1

    jamesblakefan#1 G.O.A.T.

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  10. Slayer

    Slayer New User

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    Then there's the cases of Mark Phillipoussis and Jenela Dokic in Australia. Not sure about Scud, but Dokic is slightly different in that she was the one doing all the hard work in wanting to play for Aus, rather than the country chasing her.
     
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  11. Sephiroth_FFVII

    Sephiroth_FFVII Rookie

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    You have to see it both ways though. For example...in Cricket...

    Kevin Pietersen is a cricket player who was originally from South Africa. However their national team never saw how good he was and never gave him a chance to represent South African.

    Great Britain stepped in, offered him UK nationality and a spot on the national team...Now he is one of their if not the their top player.
     
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  12. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    I've heard of this happenign a lot in athletics. Runners from Kenya and Ethiopia running from other countries ... there was a report that some country did not treat them well and took away their passports.

    However, it does give them a chance to participate in the Olympics where they would not get a chance at all in their given countries.

    However since tennis does not seem to have a restriction of players from one country this does not seem to be an issue.
     
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  13. jamesblakefan#1

    jamesblakefan#1 G.O.A.T.

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    Tursunov was trying to become an American in order to play possibly for US Davis Cup, but couldn't gain citizenship.
     
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  14. SempreSami

    SempreSami Hall of Fame

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    That's bollocks, Pietersen has an English mother.
     
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  15. MaiDee

    MaiDee Semi-Pro

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    Monica Seles Serbia - USA
    Jelena Dokic Seriba - Australia
    Daniel Nestor Serbia - Canada
    But we are not friends with those countries any more, so nobody else will change nationality (my opinion).
     
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  16. AndrewD

    AndrewD Legend

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    Are you retarded? Why in the world would you mention Phillipoussis if you had no idea about his background?

    He's 2nd generation Australian, exactly the same as Sampras, Chang and Agassi are 2nd generation American.


    You do know that isn't true, don't you?

    England didn't offer him citizenship (the correct term) and a spot in the national team - they couldn't. There was a 4 year qualification period before he could represent England SO there obviously wasn't any guarantees that he'd be picked in the team when he was eligible. The truth is that he was recruited to England to play for a County team - exactly the same as thousands of others have done.
     
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  17. nfor304

    nfor304 Banned

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    What are you talking about?

    Philippoussis was born in Australia and Dokic moved here when she was young.

    Dokic was not the one 'doing all the work' wanting to play for Australia, she was always the next upcoming Australian star and played Fed cup since the age of 15, and Australia always left the door open for her to play Fed Cup and represent Australia in tournaments even after her crazy dad influenced her to switch nationalities when she was about 18.

    Australia also completely funded her tennis development and after she left at a young age and switched nationalities to another nation Tennis Australia and many past and present players let it known that they weren't happy with what happened.
     
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  18. nfor304

    nfor304 Banned

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    Dokic and Nestor were not 'imported' to play tennis. They immigrated to their adopted countries when they were 8 years old and 4 years old respectively.

    Seles chose to represent the USA when she became a citizen. She wasn't 'imported' either.
     
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  19. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Yup, Pietersen disliked the quota system in South Africa which was limiting his chances. He decided to move to England and was approached by the small club I played for in the Birmingham league, he played for us for 2 years before moving on to Nottinghamshire.

    Cannock was where it all started!
     
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  20. tennis_hand

    tennis_hand Hall of Fame

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    why is it not fair?
     
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  21. IvanAndreevich

    IvanAndreevich Legend

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    Greg Rusedski played for GB but he's Canadian.
     
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  22. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    He has dual citizenship. He went to play for GB after negotiating with both federations and finding they could offer him far more. It was all about money for Greg. (though he claimed it was about his heart...and his gf (british))
     
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  23. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    Lendl wanted to be "American" so he could play Davis Cup LOL
     
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  24. ipitythefool

    ipitythefool Semi-Pro

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    Marsel Ilhan of Ozbekistan (where Safin is also originally from) was naturalized to become a Turkish citizen. Now he is the highest ranked "Turkish" player ever, at mid 100s :)
     
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  25. dropshot winner

    dropshot winner Hall of Fame

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    Switzerland should buy Soderling.
    From what I heard and read most people don't know the difference between Switzerland and Sweden anyway, and therefore wouldn't notice a thing.

    The Davis Cup would be ours with a team of Federer, Wawrinka and Soderling.
     
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  26. rommil

    rommil Legend

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    ^LOL where did you ever heard such a thing where people don't know the differrence between Switzerland and Sweden?
     
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  27. dropshot winner

    dropshot winner Hall of Fame

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    Actually I heard/read that multiple times, and almost all the time it was an american who got confused by the two countries.

    In a Federer video on youtube someone wrote that Federer was the best swedish player in history :p.
     
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  28. MaiDee

    MaiDee Semi-Pro

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    George Bush didn't know different between Slovenia and Slovakia. What about ordinary people. Stupid americans.
     
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  29. rommil

    rommil Legend

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    A lot of Americans would be insulted if you make Georgie the parameter but I don't disagree completely. There are a lot of Americans who are geographically challenged( I'm pretty sure there are too in every country).
     
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  30. MaiDee

    MaiDee Semi-Pro

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    Who offer her citizenship? Why? Can I have citizenship? No! Why?
    She was "imported".
    A lot of Serb's went to Australia and Canada, but no citizenship, after many years!
    My english is very poor, so maybe I dont understand well "imported".
    Maybe it mean to pay freight costs and taxes.
     
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  31. Gorecki

    Gorecki G.O.A.T.

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    a mans home is where he feels at...
     
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  32. woodrow1029

    woodrow1029 Guest

    That is pretty far out there!
     
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  33. rommil

    rommil Legend

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    In the Philippines(where the OP is from if I'm not mistaken), the number one sport is basketball (yes basketball). It's a "commercial" league, meaning teams are sponsored by a big commercial company. So basically most of the players are from the Philippines but they are allowed to get "imported" players, meaning somebody from another country and they don't have to have any ties or ancestry connected to the Philippines. I don't know if most of them end up getting naturalized eventually but that's the best way I can explain it.
    In tennis, it's a bit different wherein you play for the country, not for a commercial company and I think you have to have some ties or naturalize yourself to be able to play for a certain country.
    I hope this helps.
     
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  34. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    That's pretty common in soccer.

    For the most part it's fair for these reasons (at least in the soccer world).

    1. FIFA set up rules concerning transfering to another country. For example, if you play for a national team past a certain point in your career, you are "locked" into that team for the rest of your life. There are some exemptions if you played at the junior level or only went to training camp but did not play in an offical match.

    2. Most of the guys who don't play for their country of birth aren't that good anyway. For example, you may see some Brazilians play for other national teams - these dudes are good, maybe better than most on the team they play on, but they aren't good enough to play on the Brazilian national team.

    3. In some cases, the player has a dual citizenship or has a parent from another country. I don't see anything wrong with representing your father's or mother's nation if you feel that strongly about it. Recent example is Giuseppe Rossi who was born in the US, but who's parents were both born in Italy - kid has mad skill and was good enough to make it on the Italian National team, even though he's technically an American and could have played with the US. Yeah, it sort of contracts #2, but I think #3 happens much less often than #2.

    4. If you change your citizenship, I don't see anything wrong with representing your choosen country. At least the FIFA rules make sure that if you do change and play for another country for thier full national team, that you are locked in and can't go back - so it's not a light decision to make.

    Don't know if Tennis has any rule similar to FIFA's - it's probably not as much as a problem as unfortuntely the Davis Cup competition isn't as high profile as something like the World Cup in soccer.
     
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  35. jamesblakefan#1

    jamesblakefan#1 G.O.A.T.

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    That's who I was thinking about. I know I'd heard of that this summer. He torched the US team in the Confederations Cup, but was born in Jersey. :lol:
     
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  36. MaiDee

    MaiDee Semi-Pro

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    Thank you, but my question was only joke.
    You are the grate talent from poor country so reach country like America offer you citizenship and money (buy you) because they want to be best in any sport in the world (even they don't have talent).
    Look at country scoreboard at US open site. You will see that they put themselves on first place with 35:33 score. It’s the shame, and it's sick.
    We don't have but we can buy. Can you imagine Davis cup team with Murray and Djokovic.
     
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  37. Elegant_Roger

    Elegant_Roger New User

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    Wilander would be devasted! :) Le Sod won the Davis Cup World Group playoff practically by himself over Romania, playing doubles and winning both his singles matches. Wilander is the captain and said he may have to ask Robin to keep pulling double duty next year, as there are no other Swedes in the top 100 now that Bjorkman retired.
     
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  38. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Yup - a lot of US fans were sick about that one. He's world class, but I don't think there was any doubt that he was going to play for the Azzuri as he moved to Europe for a pro contract and I also heard his dad would not have him play for the US.
     
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  39. elquien

    elquien New User

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    I am an American. We are the most guilty of it. Although a lot of athletes leave their countries for when they are very young or for legit reasons (Seles Navaratilova). Most are just here for the advanatage we provide them for trainging. Although some live here all their lives and still choose to play for their "home" countries (Pova, Pierce)

    this is importing:

    Yaroslava Shvedova

    Q. When did you move to Kazakhstan?
    YAROSLAVA SHVEDOVA: I was thinking like last year, like to move somewhere because I was like coming up and start to improving my game. In Russia was difficult to practice, difficult, because I was like 15 in the country in the WTA ranking, and it was like Federation didn't help. I don't have opportunity to play Fed Cups, maybe Olympics.
    Kazakhstan like came to me and ask me if I want to represent Kazakhstan. I said, Yeah, why not? Because I always wanted to represent a country and play Olympics, play Fed Cups, because I love team competitions. And I was like so happy for my change.

    from

    http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=58935
     
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  40. burosky

    burosky Professional

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    It's not a question of fairness. If there are local players who are world class athletes do you think they would bother looking elsewhere if they are better?

    In the case of basketball in the Philippines, it's no different from basketball in other parts of the world where they have "imports". It's all done to add more entertainment value to the sport.

    Keep in mind this is not an apple to apple comparison. Being a basketball import does not have any citizenship requirement. Those imported players do not represent the country in any competition. They only play within the country. On the other hand, those players like Mamiit, Taino and recently, Huey represent the Philippines in Davis cup. As such, they have to have some tie to the Philippines which allows them to be considered for citizenship. Only then can they represent the country in international competition.
     
    #40
  41. infinity

    infinity New User

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    Hey people, new to the boards. Just a quick comment on Monaco; the entire team is French and this has been the case for a long time. Balleret was actually born in a hospital there (his father was a permanent figure on the team), but the rest are bottom shelf, French journeymen, who are offered the Monagasque citizenship for five years of Davis Cup, including the guy who is currently acting as 'captain'. Last spring, I was down at the challenger in San Remo and saw him leaving in a tricked out, white Audi S5 for a grinder event, where the winner makes around 1K Euros? He lost in the first round. Prince Albert must have his back..
     
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  42. oy vey

    oy vey Semi-Pro

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    Brits tried to buy Djok and isn't Laura Robson Australian?
     
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