dbl-hander grip

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by drummerboy, May 7, 2004.

  1. drummerboy

    drummerboy Rookie

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    Hi

    I am having this problems with my dbl-hander. I hit a lot of balls out and I cannot generate enough spin.My grip is eastern forehand with left and continental with the right. I think that it would be a good idea that I would go to a more counterclockwise grip with my right and stay with the eastern with the left. So I would be griping it with the calssical backhand grip with the right and eastern forehand with the left. Anyone using that grip or are you all continental grippers. Thanks

    Matt
     
    #1
  2. BLiND

    BLiND Hall of Fame

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    Not that I am a pro or anything (3.5) but I hit with a western grip both left and right hand gripping the handle... with my hands at like 9 & 2 o'clock on the handle.

    The swing itself gives me a certain amount of natural topspin (naturally wing low-to-high), but I have yet to develop the technique to create a LOT of topspin on my backhand.

    Move your left (assuming your right-handed) hand further round the handle towards western.
     
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  3. Tim Tennis

    Tim Tennis Professional

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    Check out your swing path in slow motion. It should be a fairly steep angle upward. Make sure you are getting the racquet head well below the the ball at the start of your forward motion. Your follow- through should end up with both hands above your right shoulder.

    Practice, experiment, have fun, see which grip combination works for you.

    You got to love the game.
     
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  4. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    It may not be your grip - it may be your technique.

    You should be hitting the ball around your front hip area. This way you wont turn your wrists up too much if you hit it too far out in front.

    Rotate more on your backswing and go front shoulder to touch the chin for the backswing then when you meet the ball and followthrough touch your chin with your other shoulder. Go shoulder to shoulder on your chin.

    Keep your head facing the contact point 2 seconds after you make contact. It could be you're pulling your head towards the left or backwards even and it is opening your racquet face. Keep your head still after contact, even if it seems forever.

    Lay your wrists back and keep the top hand wrist laid back at contact, your bottom wrist will be bent back on the backswing to the allow the laid back top wrist, then it sort of straightens out (BUT IS RELAXED!!!!) at contact.

    Make sure you're pushing through with your top arm and not pulling out with your front arm.

    Hope that helps.
     
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  5. drummerboy

    drummerboy Rookie

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    Cheers guys. Yes Bill it definitely is my technique. First of all I definitely hit the balls way out in front of me which is bad. I am also pulling out with my front arm. Will concentrate and try to do it better.
    I didn't understand your head reference and that 2 seconds facing the contact point. Could you explain it in some easier way (I am from Slovenia so my English is not so good lol.)

    Thanks again
     
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  6. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Sure,

    When you hit the ball you should be looking at the spot that your racquet is meeting the ball. Then as you hit the ball, you go through it, and followthrough. Dont lift your head here, keep it looking at the contact point until your other shoulder hits your chin and brings the head up. This is good discipline.

    I said to hold it for 2 seconds to exagerrate the feel of leaving your head in the shot. Obviously in real play your going to more fluid vs. mechanical.

    Play the link below to see what I mean. Notice how the head turns and allows the eyes to focus on the contact point (the 45 degree angle) as he is meeting the ball it doesnt let go of that contact point until well after the ball is gone. Watch the shoulder touch the chin before moving up. You will exaggerate it much more then Hewitt but you will get the idea.

    http://www.uspta.com/html/e-lesson-twohand backhand 56k.swf

    Remember when you take a swing at the ball it is your only chance to take a good swing without producing an error one swing at a time. Make every swing a good swing. Moving the head around is one of the #1 problems in club tennis vs. the pros on hitting consistent strokes.

    Your swing path can be easily corrupted by moving the head too soon. The head should be thought of as the top of the pendulum. The part that allows the moving parts to stay in snyc throughout the swing movement. The shoulders, arms, torso, legs all operate underneath it. Move the head and you move the whole pendulum and risk mishitting it. The head also holds the eyes in place. Move the head and you change the calculation and information the eyes are giving the brain on how to meet the ball.

    Keep the head still thoroughout the swing and you will solve a lot of problems.
     
    #6
  7. drummerboy

    drummerboy Rookie

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    This is great Bill. You are the man. I didn't have the slightest idea that head is playing any role at all in the good double hander. This is some interesting stuff. Will try it soon.
    Oh and I almost forgot, is head playing the role in the forehand stroke also and how? You have any clip?

    See ya
     
    #7
  8. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    It is important to keep the head with eyes looking at the contact point on ALL strokes, including your serve.

    http://www.uspta.com/html/e-lesson-Open stance forehand 2.swf
     
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