Decompressed Shoulder 7 months on...

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Pacific lefty, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    So here I am 7 months on from the SAD procedure, and I am playing harder and harder (not without the small bit of soreness when I am playing long hours or difficult matches). I was just reviewing Say Chi's old posts saying that it took 7 months to return to serving tennis which makes sense.

    I think just so long as that soreness goes away after a rest/recovery day or two, that is a good thing! Am doing the thrower's ten exercises a couple times a week pretty religiously which helps along with some yoga/Pilates plank exercises.

    As well, I have finally comprehended the "Pronation" concept thanks to my new coach (who is making me do an abbreviated take back on the serve). I think this is helping and it is making my ball toss improve.

    Hey, anybody out there who has had the shoulder work done! Tell me its okay to still get a few small twinges after a long match!!! I am still a bit paranoid! This is not affecting daily arm use or functionality at all or sleeping or anything like that. It is just post match soreness I think...
     
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  2. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    It took me ~half the year to get back onto the tennis court, but there's more to it than that.

    I think it's normal, you probably know my story by now through our communications over the time of your recovery, but I'll refresh you: two shoulder surgeries for SAD and rotator cuff work all before the age of 23 (or 22 I don't remember).

    It wasn't until 2 years after the 2nd surgery that, the shoulder was well enough to serve on consecutive days without it screaming at me.

    Just keep doing your exercises and stretches. Also, I think it's important that you KEEP serving. You're sore because you lack the stamina to serve repeatedly. Unfortunately, no amount of rehab can mimic the motion of the serve (at least safely!).

    So keep serving, get a basket of balls. If you think you'll be sore after 100 balls, then serve 80-90. As your shoulder gets tired, the rotator cuff loses its strength and ability to stabilize the joint. You just have to work at it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012
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  3. pdx_tennisplayer

    pdx_tennisplayer New User

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    Same with me, I had RC surgery in June 2011 and still try to avoid playing multiple days in a row (although I have). Stay religious with the Theraband and you should be fine.

    John
     
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  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Hey PacLefty...
    7 months is pretty quick recovery time if you're playing your normal old game in the normal amount of hours. Like borderline pushing the limits.
    I've separated my shoulder's 4 times, couple of dislocateds, and 4 clavical breaks. 7 months to full speed serving is beyond my comprehension, as the separates and dislocates took me closer to a year and a half to serve full speed in match play. Even the clavical breaks took that much time.
    The twinges just tell you that while you might have all the strength of before, that you are only 70% healed.
    70 is plenty to play tennis, but not the kind of tennis that relies on big first serves and head high kicking second serves.
     
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  5. therecanbeonlyone

    therecanbeonlyone New User

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    During a 10 year break from tennis I tore 2 shoulder ligaments (grade 3 AC joint separation). No surgery as I wasn't playing tennis at the time and working a desk job. It took 1.5 months to get full range of motion back. Fast forward 2 years and I started playing tennis again. I had to hit 3rd serves for 3 or 4 months (couldn't muster a 2nd serve). However, after 8 or 9 months it stopped hurting and since then I was able to start adding 1st serve type pace and severe spins and hitting real overheads without fear.
    You'll get there!
     
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  6. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    This is great to know!

    Thanks very much everybody for the response. That is what I was looking for. I think one has the tendency to go through a surgery, and you work really really hard on rehab, and for some reason you think that now everything is going to be perfect.

    Well I am really happy with progress so far except for this small glitch, but I do realise that it may take a bit longer to get back to 100% with serving (I can't help it but I have to hit a nice hard first because I love getting the points on it that I do)...

    I am definitely sticking with the resistance bands and even some light weights because that really helps. I agree that developing stamina is the most important thing and that the serving will probably come with that. Great to hear you have all been there and that inevitably I just need a bit of time and patience!
     
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  7. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Glad to hear you are overall doing well.

    It also sounds like you are making changes in your technique to make recurrent problems less likely - more "pronation", with your chest aimed up at the ball, and with less attempt to reach tall and impinge your shoulder.
    Your serve technique doing more harm than good? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgdXawklcZk
    Angle of Racquet on Serve
    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6eix2_angle-of-racquet-on-serve_sport#.UL4rZKw0WSo

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Are you following Jim Mclellan's advice - "You've got to drop the left shoulder."
    Preventing Rotator Cuff Injury http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTRvxaBMh8s


    [I remember last spring when you were undergoing surgery - just for a clean out, not major shoulder surgery.
    I remember wishing good luck for a happy, healthy 2013 without shoulder issues. I wasn't trying to be a wise guy. I really think patients and surgeons are not really prepared for the long healing phase for a motion as violent as serving a tennis ball - it takes a long time.
    Maybe a little early for New Year's greetings, but again I'll wish you best wishes for a happy, healthy 2013!]
     
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  8. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Hey CharlieF, so great to hear from you. You are so right that it does take longer to heal than anticipated and get back to my previous form. When I was starting to feel a bit paranoid I did remember what you and others said about needing to give it time, and to patiently work through the rehab and to check your technique.

    The serving changes I have been working on are really helping and first and foremost, when I serve, my main mental checklist has as number one "drop right shoulder" which helps immensely, as well as Todd Ellenbecker's "magic 90 degrees"!

    This time last year I was really missing tennis, and these nights in Ireland when it is dry, bright and slightly frosty, I am so enjoying being out!!! Thanks for the good wishes (and great info as usual) and an early Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you.
     
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  9. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    Just stay hungry and determined. Until you hit 100%, you're going to run into more bumps than paradise. Stay hungry.

    But once you hit 100%, and assuming you continue to do a abbreviated maintenance workout routine on your shoulder, it'll be indestructible. At least for me it is.

    Don't overlook rest, if you feel like it's time to take a day or two off from playing, you're more likely to be correct about the shoulder needing the rest than not.
     
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  10. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    That's great to hear, Say Chi, will do. Wise words about taking breaks from time to time, I am and will continue to whenever needed.
     
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  11. DInosaurTT

    DInosaurTT New User

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    Glad to hear things are still going in the right direction. I am at about 1.5 years since my SAD and SLAP repair and I am now as strong as before the shoulder problems. While I was playing within a few months like you have been, it did take more like a year to start serving with much penetration and only in the last 2 of months have I been able to serve with similar aggression to before the surgery with confidence and able to do similar the next day. For the first year after surgery I was cautious about playing more than once or at most twice a week although I do tend to play al year round given the number of indoor and bubble courts I have available on my doorstep and that does not give an off season break. Taking a break is definitely a positive thing in my personal experience as a couple of times the soreness built up and I just stopped for a couple of weeks and it was much better. I have to say though that any soreness I had was pretty minor relative to the original injury and although I did have some worries like you, the problem was soreness rather than real pain.

    Having said all that my first serve was apalling last night, but that was nothing to do with my shoulder
     
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  12. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Hi Dinosaur, thanks for letting me know the time frame for your total recovery. You see this is the tricky thing. I had a practice hit today and the ground strokes were great. The serve can be a disaster from time to time and I think it is really psychological, as for me the serve was what caused the injury in the first place...
     
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