--deep tissue massage for tennis elbow--

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by lovin'it, May 15, 2009.

  1. lovin'it

    lovin'it Rookie

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    did a workout/boot camp today with a guy i know is quite certified in sports massage, fitness, etc. (don't know specific qualifications, did at one time and it was impressive)

    he told me about deep tissue massage, and how it helped a client of his who had really bad tennis elbow. he did a bit after the workout...pretty deep, especially considering how little meat there is on an elbow...

    any experience anyone have with this?

    ((i do know it is multi dimensional for overcoming t.e. - strengthening, stroke formation, equipment - just wondering if this is an additional angle i should pur$ue....))
     
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  2. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

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    I had TE last year. I did deep tissue massage and I believe it really helped me. Of course, i also did all the other things like icing, PT, BandIT, racquet/string/grip changes etc..
     
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  3. yellowoctopus

    yellowoctopus Professional

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    My orthopaedist informed me that massaging the tendon, whether deep-tissue or not, is good for at least two reasons. The first benefit comes from pushing the excess fluid from the sinovial sheath to temporarily reduce the inflamation. The second is the stretching of the muscle and the tendon, which should be done routinely during the recovery.

    Other than that, it's just resting, ice, NSAID (non-steroid anti-inflamatory drugs)...etc.
     
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  4. momtogrif

    momtogrif Rookie

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    This is good to know b/c that's my next step after PT. I'm giving PT a shot for about another month but after that I'll be looking for a therapist who does deep tissue massage.
    Anyone in the Phoenix area know of a good therapist for this type of massage?
     
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  5. Grizvok

    Grizvok Semi-Pro

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    You should be looking for somebody that does massage ASAP.

    Along with tennis, I'm also an avid rock climber and you can probably imagine the elbow issues associated with that (tennis pales in comparison). The technique is called cross friction fiber massage and can even be done by yourself very easily. What you need to do is be able to exactly locate the tendon that is suffering. My tendinitis/tendinosis (I'll get to what tendinosis is later) was of the brachialis tendon that attached to the elbow, however; this specific tendon is definitely not what you injured. After you locate the tendon you can use your middle finger with added help from the index finger to massage the tendon back and forth. This SHOULD be painful or else you really aren't pressing hard enough; your level of pain should be at a 6/10. I'd do this for 2-3 minutes along the length of the tendon once a day to start out.

    Please note it's called CROSS FIBER friction massage for a reason. You rub across the tendon fibers, not up and down.

    There is a huge misconception among people with no knowledge of it, but the condition you most likely have is called tendinosis. A tendon injury is normally labeled tendinosis after it has progressed past tendinitis (which doesn't take much time at all). Tendinitis is the inflammation of the tendon causing pain and much less range of motion when it becomes inflamed. Tendinosis on the other hand is an actual degenerative disorder of the tendon where your tendon gets inflamed and then partially heals over and over and over because you won't give it adequate rest to fully heal. The fiber massage helps realign tendon fibers and helps break up the weird jelly like substance that impedes healing. Having your tendons ****ed up like this really isn't fun, I'd know.

    And finally, if you think you might actually have tendinosis then ice is really doing NOTHING for you whatsoever. Switch to heat.
     
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  6. topspin

    topspin Semi-Pro

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    Search for my thread on myotherapy. I've had very good results with deep tissue massage. Two treatments allowed me to go from having to take anti-inflamatories and muscle relaxers (which you want to avoid at all cost) to being able to exercise and play badminton. It has given me the chance to live my life normally. This is something I thought was lost forever when I could not get up or even walk straight without an enourmos amount of effort.
     
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  7. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    All good, but I would have to disagree with the last paragraph.

    For active players with TE, you would always have inflammation along with degeneration. So icing is always a good thing, especially right after tennis.

    Having said this, alternating between ice and heat might do good as well.

    Personally I use ice, deep-tissue massage/active release technique, cold laser therapy, stretching and exercises.
     
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  8. Jim A

    Jim A Professional

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    Active Release Therapy may also help your issues with the elbow as it will break up that scar tissue and allow proper range of motion

    of course you need to find the cause for the TE first so once pain is gone you can continue to treat the symptoms (for me the achilles issues were traced to soleus/hamstring issues and I need to stretch multiple times daily
     
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  9. plasma

    plasma Banned

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    some bodyworkers are geniuses and understand more about these types of injuries than MD's. myofacial release is highly advanced. I couldn't begin to describe some of their unique and effective healing modalities, i'd get laughed off this board...but they are real.
     
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  10. momtogrif

    momtogrif Rookie

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    So, what is active release?? Do you have to find a practitioner to perform it or is it like the cross friction massage where you can do it yourself?
     
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  11. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    Active release technique attempts to undo the adhesion of soft-tissue fibers.

    A crude way to describe it is for the practitioner to use acupressure/deep-tissue massage on a critical point on the body and simultaneously have the patient move that part of the body in various manners.

    This would be difficult to do on your own.

    You would want to look for chiropractors/physios who have been certified for ART.
     
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