Did anyone make it to the top 10 without any real coaching?

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by Golden Retriever, Oct 24, 2009.

  1. Golden Retriever

    Golden Retriever Hall of Fame

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    More or less like some music legends who haven't had a single music lesson in their lives and don't read music at all.
     
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  2. David L

    David L Hall of Fame

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    There would have been more chance of this earlier in the history of tennis before it became so professional. It would be less likely today since so many now have the advantage of high quality coaching.

    Music is not a good comparison because musicians are not ranked solely according to how good or technically proficient they are. You can still have great success with limited proficiency, provided you are able to emotionally move or inspire enough people. It's much much easier to become a successful musician than a successful tennis player because you have to, at least, be a top 50 talent to stand a chance of winning the biggest titles. No such threshold exists with musicians, otherwise, at least as far as technique is concerned, no one else would get a look in with classical and jazz musicians around.
     
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  3. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Paradorn Srichaphan.

    He learned to play from watching videos of Michael Chang. His father, who never played tennis before, was his coach.
     
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  4. Golden Retriever

    Golden Retriever Hall of Fame

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    So how come he has a 1HBH, a lousy one too?
     
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  5. Golden Retriever

    Golden Retriever Hall of Fame

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    But some jazz musicians who have awesome technic don't read music neither.
     
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  6. David L

    David L Hall of Fame

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    Yes, but I didn't choose jazz musicians for their technique. Many of them have great technique, but classical musicians have the best technique. What distinguishes jazz musicians is the great musical flexibility they have. The ability to improvise and spin complex tunes on the spot. Rankings based on technique would just be full of classical musicians, from No.1 into the multiple 1000s, but rankings based on real-time musicianship would be dominated by jazz musicians. Rankings based on both would mix the two. In any case, many of the jazz musicians who could not read music received training too, just with an emphasis on improvisation.
     
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  7. jones101

    jones101 Hall of Fame

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    Didn't nadal learn from Uncle Tony?

    I dont know or heard of him going to any academies when younger.
     
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  8. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Because he's a lot smarter than you are and figured out the 1HBH is the better shot after watching Sampras destroy Chang in the '96 US Open final. :)

    BTW, if you think Srichaphan's 1HBH is "lousy" then you have obviously never seen him play. :-?
     
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  9. hyperwarrior

    hyperwarrior Professional

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    Golden Retriever, you're owned by Breakpoint!!!
     
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  10. btangel

    btangel New User

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    Agree with BP about Srichaphan. If anything the guy has one of the best 1hbh's I've seen on the ATP. The guy was a born athlete man. His running back diagonally and hitting a tweener cross court from that position for a winner... I say that was a better shot than what Federer did to Djoko at this year's USO.
     
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  11. David L

    David L Hall of Fame

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    This is all relative. Roddick would have practiced volleys from the very moment he picked up a racket and would look like an amazing volleyer against anyone not playing at ATP level, and even against some of the lower ranked ATP guys. However, against the best players in the world (top 200 say), this becomes a much much tougher proposition if this is not the game you concentrated on in your development. Any 'deficiency' you notice in any ATP player, is only relative to other players playing at the highest possible standard. Roddicks volleys and backhand are by no means perfect, but they are not bad either.
     
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