Did your Cortisone shot help?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by athiker, Jan 11, 2010.

?

Did your Cortisone shot significantly contribute to your long-term recovery?

Poll closed Jan 11, 2011.
  1. Yes

    10 vote(s)
    55.6%
  2. No

    8 vote(s)
    44.4%
  1. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    I just read through a good chunk of this thread on shoulder injuries and treatment: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=179256

    It got me wondering as I had a cortisone shot in my shoulder back in the 90's and thought I had been cured...for a few days! It was amazing how the pain went away (even though its an anti-inflamatory, not a pain reliever), but it had zero long-term effect as far as I could tell.

    I don't know if I've ever met someone who had a cortisone shot and that "cured" them so my question is simple: Do you feel your cortisone shot sginificantly helped cure your issue long-term? Yes or No?

    I realize many also have concurrent Physical Therapy, Ultrasound treatments and maybe even surgery, but want to know your feeling on whether the Cortisone shot actually significanlty contributed to your long-term treatment.

    Cortison Shot explanation: http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/paindrugs/a/cortisone.htm
     
    #1
  2. ttbrowne

    ttbrowne Hall of Fame

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    Yes, and if you will search this topic, It's been discussed at length in previous threads.
     
    #2
  3. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    Oops, I should have mentioned in the original post. This poll is not limited to just shoulder injuries...shoulder, elbow, knee, ankle, back, hip...anything is fair game.
     
    #3
  4. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    I did a search for Cortisone, and saw quite a few threads pop up. I didn't see a simple poll however. I'm just trying to get an overall breakdown via a poll. I know its a popular treatment so that's why I wanted to see a poll.
     
    #4
  5. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    It was no cure, but it did help the recovery process. Tough to parse out how much it helped, however.

    It's possible that simply REST, and nothing else, would have been sufficient.

    -Robert
     
    #5
  6. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    i took two and they seemed to help, but my TE is a long long recovery, thanks to the wilson hyper hammer.
     
    #6
  7. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    It's justs masks the problem.
     
    #7
  8. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    For my chronic plantar fasciitis, cortisone shot did not even mask the pain.

    What did work, however, was Voltaren Gel.
     
    #8
  9. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    My friend had plantar fasciitis now she cannot run anymore. Since she had a few cortisone shots plus some pain pills.
     
    #9
  10. yemenmocha

    yemenmocha Professional

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    No, but only because it said significantly & long term.
     
    #10
  11. LA Nate

    LA Nate New User

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    I voted "Yes". I am only two months away from my shot, so I don't really qualify for long term recovery. I was in constant pain playing tennis or not. I am back on the court now.

    I did a number of things though...ultra-sound, PT, chiro, various prescriptions.
     
    #11
  12. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    I would say 2 months qualifies. The effects of mine maybe lasted maybe a week. It's been a while so can't remember exactly. I just remember the feeling the next day that I was cured and shortly thereafter the pain was back (not due to reinjury).

    I'm interested that so far the overall results skew positive...that's a good thing I guess. I was starting to get the impression cortisone shots were just kind of a "take two aspirin and call me in the morning" thing to get people out of the office. Not a lot of votes in yet though.
     
    #12
  13. Suezee

    Suezee New User

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    I think if you read my post on "Is it tendinitis or tendinosis", you would see that I am not such a big fan, as most of the evidence today shows that in most cases, tendon problems are not primarily due to inflammation.

    As a side note, medical professionals knew the above information, but in some cases, the shots seemed to help. One of the problems with tendinopathy is that the deep portions of the tendon do not receive a good supply of blood. Researchers thought that maybe it was not the cortisone that helped, but the puncture wound that led to a localized bleed, which resulted in some healing. They tried just poking people's tendons ("fenestration") to get the same effect, but it was extremely painful. (Duh!) Then, they decided that they could try drawing a patient's blood and re-injecting it into the area of pain. All of this led to the technique being investigated now called PRP ("platelet rich plasma") injections. There is some evidence that this might be helpful. Results are better when the doctor images the area ahead of time with ultrasound, which insures that they are hitting the right spot. Unfortunately, I don't think alot of insurance companies are paying for it at this time.
     
    #13
  14. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    Interesting. I had some nagging knee pain...front of my knee just below the knee cap after a skiing accident. It wouldn't seem to heal even after my other injuries had (well except my shoulder...same accident). The doc/surgeon did mention an option, as I remember, of basically making small lacerations on the tendon to promote blood flow and possible healing. He said it wasn't guaranteed to work but he had had some success with it. This was in the 90's.
     
    #14
  15. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I took the cortisone pills for my GE in September. I was pain free for a month playing 3 times a week but after that the pain returned. If I get the shot, I'll be sure to rest my arm this time.
     
    #15
  16. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    A review of randomized control studies for tennis elbow was just published, concluding cortisone shots probably have an early positive effect, and physical therapy a positive intermediate and long term effect.

    "Effectiveness of corticosteroid injections compared with physiotherapeutic interventions for lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review.
    Barr S, Cerisola FL, Blanchard V.

    RESULTS: Five RCTs [Randomized Controlled Trials] were identified and included in the review. Four of the studies included the measurement of pain-free grip strength. Standardised mean differences (effect sizes) were calculated for this outcome measure and assessor's rating of severity at 3, 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks for two of the RCTs. Large effect sizes were demonstrated in favour of corticosteroid injections at short-term follow-up. At intermediate- and long-term follow-up, medium-to-large effect sizes were demonstrated in favour of physiotherapeutic interventions compared with corticosteroid injections. However, at long-term follow-up, the research suggests that there is a small benefit of physiotherapeutic interventions compared with a 'wait and see' policy.
    CONCLUSION: Overall, the findings indicated that corticosteroid injections are effective at short-term follow-up, and physiotherapeutic interventions are effective at intermediate- and long-term follow-up. However, due to the limited number of high-quality RCTs and differences in the interventions and outcomes utilised within each of the included studies, any conclusions drawn must be interpreted with caution."
    - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/...ed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=10
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2010
    #16
  17. TonLars

    TonLars Professional

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    I had one in the shoulder and one in the wrist and both of these cortisone shots I received practically cured the problems. I havent thought of the injuries since for years
     
    #17
  18. heartman

    heartman Rookie

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    Cortisone works very well for me. Numerous joints - numerous shots. Rest and ice worked well too.
     
    #18

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