Difference between a cheap stringing machine and expensive

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by newyorkstadium, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. newyorkstadium

    newyorkstadium Semi-Pro

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    How much of a difference will it make for things like post-stringing tension, string-bed stiffness and elasticity? Just wondering whether I can get accurate string jobs using a cheap machine.
     
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  2. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Yes you can
     
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  3. newyorkstadium

    newyorkstadium Semi-Pro

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    Are expensive machines easier to use? I was thinking of getting a gamma 602 FC. Will it be difficult to produce a good, accurate string job using this machine? Are there other options that are cheaper, reliable and accurate. I'm only stringing for myself and my brother.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
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  4. hyperion99

    hyperion99 Semi-Pro

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    You should take a look into this thread before considering any purchase of a stringer
    It gives you all the information you need to know.
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=213946
     
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  5. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Usually higher cost will be for quality parts and service. I have never had an issue with Gamma service. I think if you're only stringing a couple of rackets that machine would be great. Once you start stringing though and your friends find out you do you may find a few more sticks to string. I bough my first machine for just my family.
     
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  6. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    OP: If you're already going to be stringing for two. .. and it sounds from your post that you are a young man, and hence will be playing tennis for many years. . . get yourself together $500 or so and buy a good machine, with fixed clamps, etc.

    I use a Kmate. It's wonderful. I string for myself and I am an old man. It fits the bill perfectly for me, especially since I string the same frame with the same string at the same tension all the time. So I know exactly what's in my roundhouse.

    You need the more expensive machine, I am guessing. Alpha makes some damn sturdy models.
     
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  7. newyorkstadium

    newyorkstadium Semi-Pro

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    Thanks everyone. I'll go with the Gamma 602 FC
     
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  8. samarai

    samarai Rookie

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    Get it if u can. I just got a fixed clamp gamma and its a joy to string. The klippermate I had before did the job, I'm just able to do the same job maybe 10-15 min faster. I was happy with the klippermate but just had some extra money so why not.
     
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  9. Cfidave

    Cfidave Professional

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    I have gone from a drop weight floating clamps to an Ektelon model H to a DG electronic to a Prince 3000. They all strung my and others racquets very well. The difference is in ease of use, quality of parts, bells & whistles, and speed. If the stringer is made well, the only real variable is the guy doing the stringing.
     
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  10. g_desilva

    g_desilva New User

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    I think Irvin will agree, but as you go up in price, you really go up in convenience, i.e. fixed clamps over floating, lockout vs dropweight (though you can go higher with an electronic constant pull), 6 point vs 2 point (debatable), etc.

    So ultimately, depending on how much you are stringing, you will start to value convenience more and more :)
     
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  11. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    I use a Klippermate. Works fine for me, but then again, perhaps I don't know what I'm missing? Maybe the Klipper is the granny stick of string machines...
     
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  12. jswinf

    jswinf Professional

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    So you set it on a pool table to bridge your cue when you can't reach it otherwise? :confused: Seems ungainly. Or am I thinking of the wrong kind of granny stick?

    OP has some good advice, welcome to stringing!
     
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  13. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    my advice to everyone-buy the best machine you can. it will last longer and you get much more out of it. why waste 35min on a cheap machine when you can string one up in 20min
     
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  14. Big_Dangerous

    Big_Dangerous Legend

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    Yeah but not everyone has 600 - 3 grand to blow on a machine.
     
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  15. samarai

    samarai Rookie

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    stringer

    I agree and the klippermate will just suffice, but if you are into tennis like most of those who posts on here ( play competitively 4-5 times per week) whats another 400 ( comparing the klippermate to the fixed clamps drop weight) for a possibly one time purchase item.
     
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  16. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    this is true. let me clarify-but the best machine you can afford. if this means you need to save up another $600, do it. it will pay off dividends way more than the $500 you save by going cheaper.

    here is why-unlike say a car Kia vs. Lotus, your driving experience is not that 'attached' to teh car.

    but with stringing your hands and fingers are very hands on, tehrefore you FEEL everything that much more. over the course of stringing it gets very pronounced when the inferior parts are being used.
     
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  17. Smasher08

    Smasher08 Hall of Fame

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    My $0.02:

    I've seen horrendous jobs done on $2000 machine, and excellent jobs done on $200 ones. Someone who's conscientious and truly cares about the quality of their work will do a fine job regardless of their machine.

    Imo, the major difference between high end and low end machines is speed. You can string in 25 mins once you're not on dropweight. Yes, they'll also have higher quality parts, but for the vast majority of recreational players, they won't see any difference in the finished product.

    Buy the best machine you can afford, but don't knock the entry-level machines either. A lot of great stringers probably started out on those at one time!
     
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  18. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    This conversation so much resembles the ones you get when talking about musical instruments.

    Let's say you've never played the oboe. You like the sound, etc. Do you buy an expensive one to start with? Perhaps you can't play it, perhaps it's a passing fancy.

    Do you buy a cheap one. . . which perhaps sounds lousy so you don't much enjoy playing it, or which is perhaps more difficult to play?

    Hard to say. For me, the key here is how much you love doing tennis. If you plan on playing for a while---and have some reasonable bucks---you might want to brush past the Kmates and cheap gammas of the world and move to the $600+ machines.

    At my age and the number of frames I do, however, despite my love of the sport, it doesn't add up to go past my Kmate. If I were 18 and KNEW I was playing another 50 years, then it would be a no-brainer to buy a more expensive machine. If I was 60 and had to string a dozen frames month, I'd pop for the more expensive machine.

    It's a calculation that's needed, and each is specific to the person who's looking at doing stringing.
     
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  19. Slitch

    Slitch Rookie

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    If you're buying your first machine you can always look in the classifieds. Bought a 602 with floating clamps really cheap. Two days ago I found a stringway ml100 with floating clamps (without the 092 mount) for the same price. Put the 602 on sale yesterday and sold it today with a small profit. I know that's cheap but the buyer is impolite, so I don't care.
     
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  20. Tamiya

    Tamiya Semi-Pro

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    You gotta know what least you need... I knew i wanted something
    with solid base, 6-point & fixed clamps. In good nick & complete.

    Or make friendly with your local proshop, hang around there long enough
    until you're part of the furniture & he don't mind you touching his toys. :)
     
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  21. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    You know, buying that first stringer also involves a bit of Buyer Concern that He Will Be Able to Actually Do It.

    You did a smart start.
     
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  22. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    I like fixed clamps because they produce a more consistent string tension, but find the floating clamps to be faster to use. If I was starting out, I would look at a pretty basic model (like the Gamma Progression 200) to see how much stringing you will actually do. If you were serious about string, I would try to get a crank because it is way faster than a drop weight.
     
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  23. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    I started stringing myself a few months back, I bought Gamma Progression 200 ($180) and Gamma Starting Clamp ($40) and Tourna Stringmeter ($29) and I am quite happy with it. I strung my two rackets about 4 times already, and I'm down to 1 hr per racket or so. Sure, I might be able to save 20+min per racket if I used a much more expensive machine, but since I string once every 8+ weeks, it's not really worth the extra expense. I think if I strung at least one or more rackets per week, I would consider something better, but you really can't go wrong with an inexpensive machine. The string jobs are as good or better than what I've been getting from pro stringers (and I could never know for sure if I was getting a good string job, since I didn't really have the tools to measure the results).

    You can always sell you used machine at an insignificant loss, probably less than $70, and buy a more expensive machine if you change your mind later. In fact, I don't agree with "buy the best you can afford" rule. You should buy what you need, based on how many rackets you string and how often. You can always translate the time you save into money, and see if the time saving and convenience of the better machine is worth it.
     
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  24. mr_fro2000

    mr_fro2000 Rookie

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    agree with this
     
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