Do a couple of Ounces make a difference?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by vmosrafa08, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. vmosrafa08

    vmosrafa08 Semi-Pro

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    I currently own the Wilson nTour two, which has a strung weight of 10.4 ounces, or about 295 grams. The new KPS 88, which some people say is quite hefty, weighs about 12.8 ounces. Can you really notice those 2.4 ounces?
     
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  2. shanker

    shanker Rookie

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    Yep! Sure can. Go your to local sporting good store or pro shop and just pick up one of the heavier sticks and then compare it side by side to yours. I'll bet you will be amazed...

    Greg:)
     
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  3. origmarm

    origmarm Hall of Fame

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    There are folk on these boards who claim they can tell a few grams different, depending on where it's placed on the frame.

    I can definitely tell 5-10g change when I lead up, again depending on where I put it.

    For me I find I'm more balance point sensitive than anything else but I find the range I like racquets in to be about 2/3 of an ounce apart. You will 100% notice an ounce or more imo even if you are a beginner
     
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  4. akoni

    akoni Rookie

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    yup, definitely a big jump in weight. depending on your level of skill and athletic build jumping from 10.4oz to just 11oz could be quite a change as well.
     
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  5. Keifers

    Keifers Legend

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    As the others have said, yes, it's quite a jump.

    I would strongly urge you to demo the KPS88 carefully before you decide to buy it. (TW has an excellent demo program, if you don't have a shop close by.)
     
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  6. vmosrafa08

    vmosrafa08 Semi-Pro

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    Unfortunately, I do not plan to buy the KPS88. It's not my type of racquet... I just wanted to compare two weights. Would a 11.4 oz. racquet be a big jump?
     
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  7. JSE

    JSE Rookie

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    From 10.4? Yes, it would be a noticeable jump. That's not saying you can't handle it by any means. It's just a noticeable difference. Like others have mentioned, try holding a few different racquets in your hand and you will see.

    For me, I like a strung racquet between 11.5 to 12 oz or so.
     
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  8. Blade0324

    Blade0324 Hall of Fame

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    Yes this is a huge jump. Even though the balance is going to be a little different between them the SW will still be higher and that is where you will really notice. Even going up .5oz is a big jump. THis is just over 14 grams and depending on where most of that weight is you will really notice.
     
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  9. In D Zone

    In D Zone Hall of Fame

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    You bet!

    You have added oz differences , plus add the head size, swingweight, frame stiffness, frame balance and beam thickness to the equation.

    And also ....the string pattern, type and tension, and grip shape and size.

    The sum of these plus your technique, playing style and physical conditioning .....

    Now that small ounce of variance isn't that small after all - right?
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2009
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  10. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    not only is the kps88 heavier than the ntour two, it plays a lot different too. you definitely would notice the difference.
     
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  11. Capt. Willie

    Capt. Willie Professional

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    I've always had my doubts about those on here who claim they could tell the difference of a few grams. However, 2.4 oz. is a major difference.
     
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  12. khw72004

    khw72004 Semi-Pro

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    I could tell the difference. But I agree balance points makes a big difference too. Head heavy rackets feel heavier even when two rackets weigh the same.
     
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  13. bertrevert

    bertrevert Hall of Fame

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    You may not feel you notice it swinging a heavier racquet in the shop - though you likely would - however, play for any length of time with the heavier racq and you will certainly notice all sorts of problems:

    1. slow reaction shots
    2. poor serve timing
    3. missed "off the toes" shots
    4. shanking
    5. sore muscles

    etc...

    There was a poll here recently and consistently posters here ranked weight as a major issue in racq selection - don't underestimate it at all. cheers
     
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  14. vmosrafa08

    vmosrafa08 Semi-Pro

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    Well, would a heavier racquet benefit my game, or would it only result in unforced errors (if it is heavier, it probably has a higher power level)?
     
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  15. akoni

    akoni Rookie

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    assuming you can keep up your swing speed with a heavier racquet it can definitely help your game. more plow-thru, deeper heavier shots, more pace, more stability, and you won't feel as if you are getting pushed around by big hitters.
     
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  16. sekerbs

    sekerbs New User

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    Hi all!! I've enjoyed lurking on this site in the various forums for about a month and finally joined. SO much great information from everybody!! I just received my new stringer which I finally decided on (Alpha Pioneer DC Plus) and will hopefully be posting pics and my experience with it soon on the machines forum.

    Anyway, about me and my racket experience...

    I just turned 46 and came back to the game last fall after about a 20 year layoff. I probably played less than 10 times during that period. About a year ago I knew I wanted to start playing again so I bought a couple of rackets online with not much research going into my decision. I figured pretty much any rackets I bought would be vastly superior to my old Head XRC's (remember those?) right? I purchased two of the Wilson Hyper Hammer 5.9 midplus model because of the following reasons: 1) very light overall, but head heavy. I thought light weight would be a benefit as you get older. 2) I really liked the graphics and color. 3) The price was very right!! They weren't being made anymore so they were heavily discounted.

    As I started to play with them last fall, I noticed my shots didn't have the pop and punch that they used to and required lots of effort, especially my serve. Even though I'm very fit and work out lots, I just attributed this to being much older and having not played for so long. I probably wouldn't have changed anything except for the fact that a few weeks ago I had a stretch of days where I played a whole bunch more than I had been and finally found out what tennis elbow feels like. Ouch!! That caused me to research cures, treatment, racket weight and balance, strings and string tension, etc... so that I could get rid of it. A key thing that I learned from several sites and people is that a light, head heavy racket is very bad for TE. I couldn't justify new sticks since I'm not working, so I decided to tinker with mine. I found that my rackets have a cap in the butt that pops off making it very easy to add weight. Cool!! I knew that is what I wanted to try first since in my research I found that most players rackets are on the heavier side with a head-light balance. With just cotton batting and various fishing and golf weights, I changed my rackets from a strung weight and balance of approx. 290g / 8 pts head heavy to 350g / 12 pts head light. That's a pretty big change, right? WHAT A DIFFERENCE!!! My shots have SO much more pop and punch with MUCH less effort and grip strength! My serve changed instantly!! It feels like it did when I was in my 20's!! I weighed my old XRC's and guess what? 350g with neutral balance. I'm definitely going to keep my rackets at this weight, but I might experiment some more with balance by moving the weights in the butt higher.

    Anyway, to answer the threads question, IMO, YES, a couple of ounces can make a HUGE difference!! Sorry this went so long...
     
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  17. vkartikv

    vkartikv Hall of Fame

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    1 oz. = 28 grams ----> makes a big difference...
     
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  18. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    One aspect that's not being discussed yet is the balance of whatever racquet you swing. Jumping to an 11.4 oz. frame would be significant in some ways, but if the heavier frame also had a much more head-light balance than your nTour Two (which I'm pretty sure has a nearly even balance), that heavier frame could actually be easier to maneuver and swing through the ball on time. With the right balance, a heavier frame is nothing to be afraid of.

    When the balance point of another racquet is in a different spot, it will have a new way of pivoting through the hitting area when you swing it. I notice it the most in terms of the change in contact point for my serves and strokes. When I try a frame that is less head-light, I feel as though I need to make contact a little farther out in front of me to duplicate my shots with the more head-light racquet.

    It's a trade-off. I go to the net a lot and I want my frame to be maneuverable, but I also need it to be stable, especially for my reaction volleys. My old ProStaffs are 12.8 oz., but they're easy for me to handle because they're also around 10 points head-light. If I liked to cruise the baseline a lot more often, I might actually enjoy a racquet with a 6-8 pt, HL balance instead - the head would probably feel a little less "twitchy".

    Remember, more weight in a frame can give you some more power, but only as long as you can swing that heftier bat with the same tempo as a lighter one that you're used to. Pick up a frame that's 2 oz. heavier and I'll bet you could easily swing it about as fast as your lighter one, but the trick is preparing earlier when you're on the court so that you can still get it to the ball on time. If you're routinely over-swinging with a light racquet to work the ball the way you want, it's probably the case that you could swing a heavier frame with a bit less ferocity to produce the same result, but there are a couple of other factors to consider including the frame's stiffness along with the string type and tension. No biggie there.

    If you try out some other frames down the road, pay attention to the weight (static weight, not swing weight), balance, and also the flex rating - more flex usually translates into less pop, but more spin and control. When you have a good idea of the range that you prefer with those three spec's, it can be a lot easier to figure out what gear can potentially suit you well.

    More coffee anyone?...
     
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  19. T1000

    T1000 Hall of Fame

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    2.8 ounces is a HUGE difference in racquets.
     
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  20. rxblitzrx

    rxblitzrx Rookie

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    i think physics explains it best, but i can't remember the equations.

    a racquet is 27 inches long. so 2 ounces extra pivoting on a point 27 inches away will magnify it's weight.
     
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  21. wao

    wao Professional

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    I would agree that you can feel the difference in static weight. I would more look at the swing weight.
     
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  22. makinao

    makinao Rookie

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    Example 1: I just added 11 grams (that's only .3 ounces) to the handle of my racquet. The difference was already discernable when I did some practice swings. It was VERY obvious when I started hitting balls. All things being equal, 2 ounces (56 grams) is a hugh difference.

    Example 2: I had just finished a set of doubles with my "modern" 11.8 ounce racquet when I saw an old Slazenger wood racquet lying around in the club. A side sticker said it was a 4 5/8 Medium, which means it must weigh about 14-15 ounces. I picked it up and it felt like a boulder compared to my present racquet.
     
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  23. LanEvo

    LanEvo Hall of Fame

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    a few ounces will make a big difference, especially with the difference in weight distribution thorughout the racquet
     
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  24. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    After a couple of hours, your arm certainly can . . . and will.
     
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  25. Sean Dugan

    Sean Dugan Rookie

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    Yes, a couple of ounces makes a big difference. My favorite customized racket weighs in at over 14.0 ounces and is about 11 points head light.

    I'm not a fan of light rackets. I can't play with a racket that weighs below 13 ounces. It feels like a toy to me. I find the added mass makes a racket much more stable which makes a huge difference if you are routinely hitting with good players who hit with heavy spin and/or significant pace.

    It's all a matter of personal taste though. There are some touring pros who use 12 ounces sticks and some that use 14 ounce clubs. I think recreational players who worry a lot about a couple of grams here and there are unnecessarily obsessing to a degree. Other factors come into play as well. Balance, swing weight, flex, string type and string tension all affect that elusive thing we call "feel."

    To put things in perspective, thirty years ago teenage girls would wield 13 and 14 ounce wood rackets and no one thought it was "too much" weight for them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2009
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