Do all (budget) machines come out of the same factory!?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Radical Shot, Apr 6, 2005.

  1. Radical Shot

    Radical Shot Semi-Pro

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    It seems to me that most of the stringing machines manufactured in the world come out of the same factory - or at least very close! I have researched many machines, and so many are similar (identical) in design and look that it makes me suspicious when one manufacturer says that their machine is better than the other. All they have done is put their logo on it and call it the "Super Duper Progression XTJ KlipStringWay Ratcho Grip" or similar.

    Actually, from my research it seems that on similar machines, the variables seem to be..
    1. The clamps material (alloy metal vs full metal)
    2. The number of clamps prongs (3 or 4)
    3. The turntable (metal vs plastic)
    4. The gripper (ratchet vs lever jaw system?)
    Am I missing something perhaps?

    What make me reluctant to buy any of these clones is the fact that so much bad press has been written about the uncertain quality of Eagnas machines. Well, it seems that if they all originate out of the same mold, then perhaps all of these type of machines should be treated with the same suspicion.

    Is it simply the case that one manufactuer can pump out different models of significantly better quality, or there a bit of smoke and mirrors going on here?

    I must admit that I'm leaning toward the Stringway machines that are manufactured in Holland - simply because they look better, have good reviews and are a lot more expensive. (oh, and the Dutch make great beer)

    Does anyone has any comments on this? Please help.
     
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  2. Kevo

    Kevo Hall of Fame

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    I recently bought an Eagnas challenger 1. It is not super high quality, but other than some small details, it seems to be well built and well put together. I did find a loose bolt or two, but I can't really complain. It is solid and works well. I think there are a couple of manufacturers that make a lot of the lower priced machines. I would bet that the quality is similar, but that you would get a better overall product with a company that pays more attention to quality control.

    I figured that Eagnas has been in business for quite some time, you can readily get parts if you need to fix something, and if all I have to do is a little assembly or bolt tightening to save $150 then I will do it. It worked out for me, but others have had worse experiences.

    However, I don't think you could go wrong with a Stringway if you're willing to spend the money though. :)
     
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  3. Mike Cottrill

    Mike Cottrill Hall of Fame

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    Klippermate is made in the good old USA.
    Eagnas made in Taiwan by Lily Lee
    Gamma, Prince, Alpha made in Taiwan not by Lily Lee from what I’m told

    But you did notice something interesting. If you look at some of the machines sold in Japan, you will notice that some parts of them are exactly the same as those sold in the US under different names. Visit tennis shops and stores around check out the quality. I have not seen an Enagas machine, but I would like to see for my self.
     
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  4. mr. stevo

    mr. stevo Rookie

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    there was a section on the sptennis page about this, give their page a shot, it's near the bottom.
     
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  5. matchpoints

    matchpoints Professional

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    From reading some UK Stringing site, if you're going to buy Eagnas, the ones to buy are the Combo, and I think they said Smart line. I forgot which site it was, but they sold Eagnas after they fine tuned them. I'm speaking of using heavy machinery to level the posts (by shaving)....etc....anyhow, even that shows that Eagnas does not pay attention to detail if an aftermarket company fine tunes them or upgrades them. So in the end, the way I see it is that you can pay less and expect a lesser quality of the same or similar machine. Or you can pay more and get a more precise machine with better finish and with better aftersale service. To me it's like buying clothes or a car. All will do the job expect some ($$$$) will do it better and look better while doing it consistently.

    Radical Shot~ You're totally correct on how many machines are almost identical on the market from country to country, from brand to brand. Here's one that compares to the Alpha line and some of the Eagnas ones. http://www.watdon.com/Manual.htm There are some other but I can't seem to find the links for them.
     
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  6. Radical Shot

    Radical Shot Semi-Pro

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    Thanks Matchpoints. This is what makes me wonder what's really going on. Suppose that a particular machine has a good name - say Gamma. Then a clone comes out that looks exactly like it, only with a different paintjob (here we go again on the paintjobs ;)). Now people may purchase this machine thinking, "It's just like a Gamma! - great bargain" Only thing is, the clamps are alloy metal, the base plate is thin aluminium and the ratchet system is inferior. It's very hard to make a decision when so many clones are on the market. I guess it really comes back to finding a brand name that has a good reputation, and buying that for absolute peace of mind - even if it costs a few dollars more.

    Thanks everyone for the input. Just trying to do my homework on this as I'm getting closer to making a purchasing decision.

    btw. How do you insert a hyperlink - everytime I do, it gets vetted?
     
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  7. matchpoints

    matchpoints Professional

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    Radical Shot~ I just copy and paste the link like any other text. Fast and easy.

    Here's another from Australia.
    www. t o p s e r v e.com.au/stringingmachines.htm (thanks for the correction Radical Shot)
    The electric ones look like the ones from Silent Partner. In fact, I think I see the W load spreaders on the head and throat mounts. I don't know man. Is it even one company copying another? There are WAY too many similarites between WAY too many companies. Who's copying who? I think maybe the FACTORY comes out with certain models and then the retailer chooses which parts he wants and what color and then adds his logo.

    So far, Prince Neos, Babolat Sensor, and the almighty KLIPPERMATE have not been copied yet. :) Here's another one with Gamma turntable, clamps, and mount posts. Even the tensioner looks the same. The only difference I see is the stand. http://www.users.bigpond.net.au/chandlertennis/html/machines.html

    So what's going on here? I'm going to get to the bottom of this sometime soon.

    WA332, WA333, WA334 is exactly what came on the Eagnas Hyper480 that I had gotten from Maxline.

    To the person that bought the Eagnas Challenger.

    Who was is it on this board that said that he had looked into this business before? Can you please contact me.
     
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  8. Radical Shot

    Radical Shot Semi-Pro

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    Thanks Matchpoints. What do you think of those in the Australian website you mentioned? I am looking at the Pro100. I noticed that the URL was blocked for you also. It should read

    www.t o p s e r v e.com.au/stringingmachines.htm

    Remove the spaces in t o p s e r v e
     
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  9. matchpoints

    matchpoints Professional

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    According to t o p s e r v e . c o m the Precision 500 (which looks identical to the Silent Partner Aria) is:

    "OFFICIAL MACHINE FOR

    NASDAQ MIAMI OPEN 2004 &

    2005 UNCLE TOBYS HARDCOURTS"

    The Precision 600 is:

    OFFICIAL MACHINE FOR

    HOPMAN CUP 2004 & 2005


    I'm assuming based on that the quality must be good.
     
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  10. Radical Shot

    Radical Shot Semi-Pro

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    I have wondered about this. The base plate, the clamps and the mounting system look the same from the Pro100 through until the Precision500. I am working off the hopeful theory that

    1. These components have not changed from the Pro100 until the Precision 500
    2. If they are good enough for the Precision500 (and hence the Miami Open), then they are good for the Pro100

    3. They really did use the Precision500 for the Miami.

    BTW, why would the Miami use an Aussie company to do their work?
     
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