Do you use Different muscles for a backhand volley than a forehand one?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Roy125, Nov 14, 2009.

  1. Roy125

    Roy125 Professional

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    I've just been wondering because I've always felt weaker and more uncomfortable with a one handed backhand volley than my forehand. A one handed volley does eventually beat a 2 handed doesn't it? Just my questions.
     
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  2. ms87

    ms87 Rookie

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    The school system has failed you.
     
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  3. Roy125

    Roy125 Professional

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    This does not help me.
     
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  4. Wes_Loves_Dunlop

    Wes_Loves_Dunlop Professional

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    thers not really any muscle involved in volleying.
    Its mainly your forearm, and being able to hold the racket at contact.
    If anything, your triceps would probably be the secondary muscle to hit hard backhand volley, and biceps for forehand
     
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  5. Blake0

    Blake0 Hall of Fame

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    I know what you mean. Your backhand volleys aren't as stable because you use different forearm muscles..and yes, eventually a 1hbv beats a 2handed one.
     
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  6. Slazenger07

    Slazenger07 Banned

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    With a backhand volley youre using the extensor muscle of the forearm, with the forehand volley youre using the flexor muscle And yes you should work on using one hand on your volleys its just easier particularly when you play at a higher level and the ball's coming much faster you dont have time to get two hands on your racquet and make sure its where it needs to be to execute the volley.
     
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  7. Geezer Guy

    Geezer Guy Hall of Fame

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    Yep - different muscles. And, for me, weaker ones for a long time. I could hit forehand volleys just fine, but just couldn't get anything on a backhand volley.

    Hang in there. You will develop those muscles after awhile. Keep working.
     
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  8. Roy125

    Roy125 Professional

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    o_O like for how long should I wait until these muscles come to me? I just started with the 1 handed backhand volley yesterday.
     
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  9. Geezer Guy

    Geezer Guy Hall of Fame

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    I'd say, maybe after about a thousand bh volleys.

    May sound like a lot, but hit about a hundred a day for about a week and a half and you've got it.
     
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  10. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    You use different muscles for every stroke when you change sides. So yes.
    Your problem with backhand volleys is technique and when to employ, of course, so you need to get the torso sideways, racketback early and not much past your oft hand shoulder, then wait for the ball and use a high to low stroke, not a chop. Try to move forwards when you have time, but most often, you don't, so stay solid.
    1HBH volley trumps the 2hbh volley after you get to 6.0 levels. Before that, it's a tossup.
    FrewMcMillian and GeneMayer could 2HBH volley better than ANY 7.0 in the late '70's. JimmyConnors on the rise of his career only hit 2HBH volleys. He could beat a few players too.
    You can never pass someone in front of you if you never veer off his course.
     
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  11. xFullCourtTenniSx

    xFullCourtTenniSx Hall of Fame

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    Take simple anatomy classes... After the first lesson on the muscular system, you'll understand right away. -.-
     
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  12. peli_kan

    peli_kan Rookie

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    He's clearly learning from reading "Prince of Tennis," evidenced by his avatar.
     
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  13. Cody

    Cody Semi-Pro

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    Or watching, god forbid.. :shock:
     
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  14. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    To a large degree, the arm and shoulder only draw the racquet through either a compact right-to-left or left-to-right path directly out in front of your chest, at least for an ideal volley. As long as you've set yourself up in a proper orientation where you're turned to either side, the arm and shoulder have to do more stabilizing of the racquet than actual swinging of it. Most of us are probably a bit stronger on that forehand side though, especially with the pectoral muscle and front of the shoulder to help.

    Remember that the real drive for good volleys comes from the legs though. For a good punch on the ball, the actual swing is only an abbreviated move of the racquet, but it's compounded by a deliberate move (often a side-step) onto your front foot as you make contact along with a bit of a core turn through the ball. Since I'm a righty, I drive off my left leg for a backhand volley and my push with my right leg fires my forehand volley.
     
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  15. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Yep, exactly. If you are strong enough to hold your racket head up with one hand, that's all you need. The power from the 1HBH volley is as Fuzz describes -- the legs.

    If I am strong enough to volley with one hand, you are!
     
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  16. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    As others have noted, volleys don't have to be hit very hard to be effective.

    Volleys are usually taken near the net which takes time away from your opponent. If that ball is hit at you hard, simply firming up your grip and arm will be enough to return the shot with pace. If the shot is hit lightly, you can step into it with your bodyweight and create low skimming shot that will be difficult to return.

    I advise going and hitting volleys against a backboard to help build the strength and basic technique needed. Learning to just block the ball back is much better than being a beginner that believes he must vigorously chop down on all volleys.
     
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  17. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Right, we don't want to "chop down" on the ball - sometimes maybe but as a general rule no. Chop stoke might work at lower levels but really is a bad habit to get into.

    However, we do want a slight downward path of the racquet to give us some backspin - can't always do that but again, as a general rule. If we can make the ball skid a spec we can keep the ball low and it help on controlling the shot.

    The other thing is that we don't want a "white knuckle" approach either - if you hold the racquet too tight you not only lose a nice fluid approach to the shot but run the risk of making the ball just fly. The grip tension actually determines, to a large degree anyway, how far the ball goes - the lose grip absorbs a lot of the ball energy and the ball want go as far after it touches the strings compared to holding the racquet tightly. I know this sound rather basic but you would be amazed at how many either forget/don't realize this.
     
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  18. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Sorry, forgot one thing.

    One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that a right handed person is more comfortable doing things on the right side of the body - at least thats been my observation.

    Although I, like several other, prefer a one handed volley, some play with two hands very effectively including at the highest level. I know a guy who used both hands, both sides, without any grip change whether he is up or back -- its what he grew up with and is an excellent player by any account. Some are fast/skilled enough to be able to pull it off.
     
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  19. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I assume you're old enough to remember FrewMcMillian and GeneMayer. Both top 100 ATP singles pros and top 5 doubles pros.
     
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  20. Roy125

    Roy125 Professional

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    I only got so far in those series until Toonami took it off the network.:evil:
     
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  21. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Actually, I am. The game has changed a lot over time and advice has to also. What was solid advice 30 or 40 years ago is outdated because of many factors. Can we still learn from "older" styles and players of different eras? - sure, as long as we remember the ball is going a lot faster and racquets are very different.
     
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  22. imalil2gangsta4u

    imalil2gangsta4u Hall of Fame

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    I have had the same problem since im been playing tennis. Im really skinny and i have a hard time with backhand volley. I never seem to get enough on it to hit it deep or clean.
     
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  23. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    imalil...
    If you are currently using 2hbh groundies, just hit 2hbh volleys with a slight switch towards conti grips both hands. Use the same basics...shoulder turn, short backswing, and stroke with your legs and torso along with your arms. You'll find good volleys easy to attain. Reach is a problem. Just like your 2hbh groundies. No different, surprisingly.
    When you get as good as FrewMcMillian, GeneMayer, and JimmyConnors, you can decide or not, to switch to one handed volleys.
     
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