Documenting your kids training

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by tennisdad65, Oct 6, 2010.

  1. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,032
    Location:
    somewhere in calif
    I was wondering how many of you document/track your kids training schedule.

    I recently started using a spreadsheet to document/track this. Not sure how long I will continue doing it, but it seems like it could be very helpful in tracking, what we are not working on, or working on too much..

    this is a sample pasted from the spread sheet I use:
    Date DrillShots TotalTime(hr) MatchPractice(hr) Rallies(hr) MiniTennis(hr) Volleys HalfVolleys DropVolleys Serve ServeReturns Approaches Overheads TopspinBackhand TopspinForehand SliceBackhand Chip&Charge Serve&Volley OnTheRise Tosses ServeSwings

    Total 965 5 1 0.5 0.5 210 70 70 70 0 70 0 100 70 35 0 0 70 100 100

    Is there any specific software to do this better?
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2010
    #1
  2. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,710
    We were.I just dont have the time.
     
    #2
  3. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,032
    Location:
    somewhere in calif
    cool.. thanks.

    I can imagine not doing it for months, then going back and doing it again for a month or so. Still might be useful to track hours, progress etc.. for a month at a time..
     
    #3
  4. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,710
    I wish we would have kept doing it.My daughter use to love for me to write in her book about what we did that day.She and i would give whatever she did that day a grade.
     
    #4
  5. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    While I'm not sure about the software you are using, you are on to something. Much like everything in life, documentation is great for your memory and to show a forward progression. If you maintain your records well, you are able to set your goals and see them accomplished. When I am out on the court with the tennis players I coach, it is more important to do minute sessions instead of quantity of balls. In tennis, a 2-point game takes usually 3-5 minutes depending and then there is a one minute break. Preparing for the war will get you through the battle, but if you only prepare for the battle chances of winning the war are very low. : )

    If you take the few minutes and make the quality of hitting great during those stints, you will see a great improvement. Just an idea. :)
     
    #5
  6. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    It is always a let down when you can see what you've done, keep track, and then you let it go. The tough part is it takes longer to regain the work than it does to keep up with it.
     
    #6
  7. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,013
    I prefer to work in bigger chunks with my son. We have hour and a half sessions 3 times per week and I generally divide each into three half-hours: the first half hour is warm-up/agility and FH/BH repetition, the second half-hour is working on a specific stroke (right now it's BH slice), and the third half hour is live situation and point play.

    To gauge where he is with learning a stroke, I like to video tape at least once a month. I make sure and do this the first day we work on a specific stroke so I can see how much he's progressed with it. Once I feel that stroke is proficient enough, I'll move it to the repetition part and start a new stroke in the middle half hour.

    I don't always strictly stick to it, but I like to have a plan of some kind.
     
    #7
  8. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,032
    Location:
    somewhere in calif
    ^^^ thanks BMC..

    You are lucky with your son. My son cannot do one thing for 30 minutes :). I have got to do 5-10 minutes of different things listed in my spreadsheet to keep him interested. Only thing he can do for 30 minutes is rallying, match play, or minitennis. He likes to serve a lot, but I limit his serves. He likes service returns too.
     
    #8
  9. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,013
    Sure. Keep in mind that during each 30 minutes, we are doing different activities/drills and I will change them up from time to time to keep it fresh... while the bigger picture remains the same.
     
    #9
  10. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    Exactly. 5-10 minutes and then a break is good too. Jr.'s typically don't have the attention span to go a 30 min segment.
     
    #10
  11. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,032
    Location:
    somewhere in calif
    It depends on the kid. My 8 yr old son's attention span is 10 minutes. But, I have seen other 5-8 yr old boys and girls who can concentrate for 30+ minutes and after 30 minutes, they still look like their ready to fight a tiger :)
     
    #11
  12. BSPE84

    BSPE84 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    418
    You ever try an online calendar like Yahoo? I use one for my son. Should be able to do pretty much everything you described except for the totalling part. Good luck!
     
    #12
  13. mike53

    mike53 Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    978
    Training records are very useful. I would particularly suggest that parents keep an accurate periodic (like every 3 months) record of their kids' standing height, sitting height and arm span. Maybe include weight and some other measurements if you like. This will help you identify the growth spurt and the exact time of peak height velocity which is the key time to start aerobic power and strength training. I also think it is useful to test and record left/right body part dominance for the hip, hand and shoulder, maybe every year or two.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2010
    #13
  14. warmsurfing

    warmsurfing Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2010
    Messages:
    143
    You guys are lucky.
    My daughter's coach does not even want me to play with my daughter.
    MY daughter is 11.She has 3 group classes( 2 hours each ) a week with him already.
    She improves a lot playing with me alone !
     
    #14
  15. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,710
    I feel your pain!!!! I see some little girls compete and fight like there is no tomorrow, and then i watch my daughter sometimes and she is just smiling and talking to her opponent wanting to be best friends??? I think all kids are different when they develop that im gonna kick my opponents butt mentality.Im just giving her the tools that one day when SHE decides that she wants to compete every match she will have all the weapons in her arsenal.I also have seen some of these little kids that are so intense at a very young age burn out.It is truely a marathon and just enjoy the progression and take it day by day!!!! good luck!!!!!!!
     
    #15
  16. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,710
    I know what you mean.My daughters coach told me dont say anything to her just hit with her and make it FUN!!!!!!!
     
    #16
  17. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,032
    Location:
    somewhere in calif
    thanks. I looked up the yahoo calendar info. I like the email to cell phone alerts for reminders. But the entering data, totaling and statistics, looking at overall snapshot etc.. seems better with a spreadsheet.
     
    #17
  18. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,032
    Location:
    somewhere in calif
    They often take advice better from anyone besides their parents :) .

    I coach my son and keep the advice to a minimum. Anytime I advice, it is always prefaced with 'Good shot but .. ' or 'Good try but ..' or 'Good technique but ..' :) .
     
    #18
  19. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    With my kid I wait until right after she hits a good shot and say, "I like the way you turned your shoulders on that backhand" or "cool split step before that forehand."

    Or I direct my correction to myself like "Daddy, don't forget to stay on your toes".

    I get boatloads of advice in there without ever 'correcting' her.
     
    #19
  20. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,032
    Location:
    somewhere in calif
    thanks! those are great suggestions.. I will try using these two strategies in the next practice session..
     
    #20
  21. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,710
    Just wait t.c.f when she gets 8 she will have figured that out.Those little coaching hints dont work that good when they are 8 they catch on quick.
     
    #21
  22. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    I hear you. It is getting real close to the time where daddy steps aside. A friend of mine is a great female coach and I will let her take over soon and just become a practice backboard.
     
    #22
  23. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    Very true. thats how kids are, and the frustrating thing is most coaches dont understand every kid is different and needs to be motivated differently..
     
    #23
  24. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,013
    I like this. "Good job" is WAY overused with kids these days and it doesn't lead anywhere. In fact, I've read academic studies that have shown overusing this type of praise has a demotivating effect as it leads kids to think they have achieved what they are after. Go to any kids sports games and you'll hear "good job" a million times for absolutely nothing.

    Now, I know some may think "they're kids, they need encouragement". Yes, but they also need to learn to achieve. I use "that's it" and "that's what I like to see" and just "yes" a lot as praise mixed in with small instructions like "turn your shoulders" or "more spin" or "quicker feet will make that shot better" etc.

    I do this when coaching groups in basketball and soccer as well. I find this keeps the kids motivated to please you rather than high-fiving each other and relaxing. After a practice , match, or game, I'll then say "good job, you worked hard today and it showed", only when the day is over and they can relax and feel good about what they've done.
     
    #24
  25. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    Good stuff coach. We just had an amazing practice tonight filled with little instructions mixed in with praise.

    My girl also loves to be challenged...things like "how fast are you?" when a ball is hit rather far away gets her to hustle more than telling her to hustle or "I'm gonna try to take this one right past you" to let her know a harder shot is coming which gets her on her toes.
     
    #25
  26. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,710
    T.C.F Doesnt it make you have a great day when they have a great practice?
     
    #26
  27. Kaz00

    Kaz00 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    703
    Location:
    Runnin round backhands
    I will repost in about 10 years when i get married and have a child lol :)

    p.s He/She will learn a 1HBH and learn how to volley before learning any other stroke.
     
    #27

Share This Page