Does Anybody Use A Different Racquet for Singles/Doubles

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by kenshireen, Jan 31, 2008.

  1. kenshireen

    kenshireen Professional

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    I have one racket that I love for singles and another that I like for doubles.
    Does anyone else use a different racket for singles and doubles

    Ken
     
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  2. nickb

    nickb Banned

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    If you are serious about tennis and want to improve stick with one racket for singles and doubles. If you are just playing for fun then go ahead and use different rackets whenever you want..

    Nick
     
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  3. grass_hopper

    grass_hopper Professional

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    i also play with a small head size racquet for single and a MP racquet for doubles game. Nick should define what he means by serious. I hope it's not going on tour.
     
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  4. nickb

    nickb Banned

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    I mean playing to win....

    Nick
     
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  5. leonardtay

    leonardtay Semi-Pro

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    I use my K90s for singles and currently either an LM Prestige (to be sold soon), Redondo Mid or MAX 200G Pro III (which I will buy soon) for doubles. It is more of an excuse to have different frames. I could play with the K90s for doubles just as well but I find that the above 3 frames that I use for doubles suit the way I play when there is a partner on my side of the net (i.e. I serve and volley much more, I hit more touch shots and serve with less outright speed and more spin - although the K90s are very easy for spin creation). At the end of the day, it is a case of finding that I get equal or better results using the racquets that I use for singles or doubles for their respective purposes plus having a chance to use more of my collection. Eventually I will probably stick with the MAX200Gs for doubles and relegate the Redondo to when I play social tennis or when I am feeling particularly knackered.
     
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  6. Noisy Ninja

    Noisy Ninja Rookie

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    I use the same racquets (K90) with different string setups for singles and doubles. Full poly setup for singles; full multi or multi/poly hybrid for doubles.
     
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  7. Supernatural_Serve

    Supernatural_Serve Professional

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    For Singles: Head LM Radical MP

    For Doubles: Head LM Radical OS or lately Head LE Agassi, both for more stability and punch at net
     
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  8. grass_hopper

    grass_hopper Professional

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    For me learning new shots and improve on hitting more consistant shots are my way of wining. Since I play with varity of people of different skill and age group I am not concerned to be a winner. it's quality of time spent on court that does it for me. different racquets do allow to play better single or double game.
     
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  9. gregmiata

    gregmiata Rookie

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    I think I land in a gray area on this question. I use the same frame (Tecnifibre TF320) for both singles and doubles but sometimes switch between the 16x20 and 18x20 patterns for singles based on who/how I am playing. Is this considered a different racquet?
     
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  10. Doc Hollidae

    Doc Hollidae Hall of Fame

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    If anything it should be the other way around.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2008
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  11. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    If you are a serve and volley player in singles, it would make sense that the same racquet should work well for you in doubles. In recent years, I've really enjoyed a couple of more flexible sticks that help my productivity from the baseline, but I'm still comfortable with them when I go to net. I guess I've changed from a pure net charger (with a stiff racquet) to a more proficient all court player and I've come to appreciate different qualities that different frames can offer.

    If you are a baseliner in singles and a net demon in doubles, it's not unreasonable that you'd prefer different racquets for the different styles of play. Just don't let it screw you up. I'm in love with two different frames these days and one might be a little more fun for doubles, but I'd spend a year stranded on a desert island (with a few dozen tennis fanatics) with either racquet - no problem. Make sure that your gear isn't a distraction.
     
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  12. Doc Hollidae

    Doc Hollidae Hall of Fame

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    The problem with switching rackets, especially for more serious players, is that they have to make adjustments in their technique to compensate for the differences in the rackets. You might take the same swing, but the timing might be different or the sweetspot a little higher or lower. IMO, it's kinda like the saying "taking two steps forward, but one step back" in a sense. The player works on his technique and improves his game, but then takes a step back because he has to re-adjust It might not be a huge step back, but the player will have to adjust regardless. On top of that, there's a mental block, because obviously that player believes one rackets gives them something the other racket doesn't. Rather than fixing the problem technically, they've decided to take the short cut and use a different performing racket as a stop gap.
     
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  13. jasonchu

    jasonchu Rookie

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    dead on.... but i still have more than one racquet just because i cant part with my old ones... they're like old friends... and the new ones are so "pretty"

    in all seriousness, stick with one frame. as your game changes/develops, you might switch but try to stick with one frame until that happens and then trade into your next "only frame".
     
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  14. Supernatural_Serve

    Supernatural_Serve Professional

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    In doubles matches I play, most points are decided at the net versus singles where they are mostly decided at the baseline and midcourt.

    The OS helps me at the net.

    But, I get more control from the MP at the baseline, the OS has more power, which I don't want, I tend to hit balls a little long rather than nice and deep for the same swing with the MP.

    So, I'm trading off a better stick at net (for doubles) for a better stick from the baseline/midcourt (for singles).

    The Agassi LE, that's really for winter doubles with the big boys (lots of 4.5 and 5.0 in our league) where I need even more weight and stability to return (block/defensive returns) big serves. I don't play singles with those guys. I'm toast.
     
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  15. Doc Hollidae

    Doc Hollidae Hall of Fame

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    Interesting take. I've never heard of anyone feel that an OS volleys better for them than a MP. Even as an OS player myself, I've always felt that MP's volley with much better stability and control than an OS. However, I've stuck with the OS for my kick serve and groundstrokes. Usually players look for more control in doubles and more power in singles. So that's also an interesting preference.
     
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  16. TsongaBonga

    TsongaBonga Rookie

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    same stick but I just take off the vib dammpener to give me more depth on slices
     
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  17. nickb

    nickb Banned

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    LOL.....I hope your joking (I cant tell).
     
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  18. iorsms

    iorsms New User

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  19. Doc Hollidae

    Doc Hollidae Hall of Fame

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    Same here, though I have a feeling he's trolling. He's posted in every thread so far....
     
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  20. Supernatural_Serve

    Supernatural_Serve Professional

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    I appreciate your feedback. Maybe its the Radical MP too. I've heard some people express similar concerns about its stability at net. It happens too often when I'm at net with it, I get a heavy or dipping ball, and if I don't contact at or near the sweetspot, it torques in my hand or some other instability feedback is felt, and I get diddly out of it, and a limp volley into the net. The OS punches that ball over the net. I pop a few up more with the OS (that might be why others might not like an OS at net), but at least it goes over the net and doesn't dribble off the racquet.

    Also, I think its more forgiving of bad volley form, wild stabs, and good old defensive reaction volleys, where again the Radical MP (which I love), just lets me down.

    It may seem counter-intuitive, but this is exactly what happens.

    As for baseline rallys, like I said earlier, I get a noticeable improvement in control, racquet head speed, and a little less spin from the MP (for the same swing) versus the OS.

    I string both with hybrid gut (mains) crosses (synth) for good pocketing effect, feel, some spin, and a little power. The more control oriented strings/setups lack the pocketing and feel I want and encourage me to swing faster causing other problems.

    Maybe my setup has something to do with my results too.
     
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