does anyone still play with any of the classice rackets???

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by jimanuel12, Jan 25, 2010.

  1. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    i have collected a few over the years, picked up a jack krammer auto at a flea market for $2.00 it had never been strung but play with the modern rackets, not the old wood or even the classics from the 80's or 90's.
    i am just too cool to play with those old rackets, i mean, i would be laughed off the courts if i show up with a so called classic racket:oops:
     
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  2. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    If you were really good, you could use a classic graphite racket, or maybe even a woody and beat those who are amused. Who would be laughing then ???
     
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  3. Don't Let It Bounce

    Don't Let It Bounce Hall of Fame

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    It depends. For some people, the experience of what a racquet feels like is a big part of their enjoyment of playing, and they like the feel of the classics. Performance-wise, for me, using a classic racquet from the mid-80's onward has negligible effect on my chances to win as compared to using a modern racquet.

    Woodies and standard-size racquets are of course harder to use, but I have occasionally used one as a handicap against a less experienced friend, as a training aid to improve my strokes, or as above to enjoy the feel for a few rallies.

    I wouldn't worry about how other people regard whatever racquet you bring to the court. The truth is, most people are too worried about their own coolness to care about yours, and the rest don't merit consideration.
     
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  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I'd bet I wouldn't drop more than 1/2 level with a new JackKramerAutograph, especially if it's a 5/8 M, which I played with quite often in the '70's. Better with a ProStaff that size.
    I play now with a 12oz Mfil and Aero 200, about the same soft flex but bigger headed, no help there.
     
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  5. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    Since returning to tennis about 5 years ago, I've played with nothing but classic, e.g. Prince Spectrum Comp, Snauwaert Vitas Gerulaitis and now with a 21 year old Chris Competition.
     
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  6. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    returned to tennis after a long lay off

    i started to play again about 5 years ago, after a 10 year lay off.
    last year i started out with a wilson hyper hammer, bad mistake, my TE has still not healed 100%.
    before that i used a head midsize when i first returned, i think it was a radical but can't remember.
    now i bought a kennex 5G and a couple of fischer M pro 105 - they are all good for the arm.
    should have never went to the hammer, but did not know any better at the time.
    the older rackets are just too heavy and the sweet spot is so small on some of the classic rackets - i will stick to the modern rackets as long as they are heavy enough and arm friendly.
     
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  7. yuth

    yuth Rookie

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    Me too. Sometimes I use donnay Borg pro to fight with K90. 555+
     
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  8. khw72004

    khw72004 Semi-Pro

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    I have only been playing with classics since I have discovered them. The feel of these classic head surpasses any other racket that I have encounter. Its quite the opposite for me. When I bring my classic rackets to the court most people remember how great the rackets I bring are and want to give it a swing for themselves.

    I have no shame in bringing classics from the 80's or 90's to play with. And if you encounter those kids that does not know anything but new rackets then you can give them a lesson on classics and they too are sometimes amazed. Being good at tennis helps too.
     
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  9. Danstevens

    Danstevens Semi-Pro

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    Agreed, I've not once been mocked for using classic rackets, in fact at my club, using classics commands some kind of respect and shows that you're not foolish enough to fool for various racket companies' marketing schemes. I don't solely play with classic rackets and when I do, they tend to be from the 90s but some of the paintjobs and playing characteristics are pretty desirable and not in any way "uncool". If you think you're too cool for classics, you may want to reconsider that view and you may find the opposite :wink:

    Another great thing about classic rackets is the story and history behind them. I often find that with other people interested in rackets, classic frames can be as (if not more) interesting as a conversation topic as modern rackets.
     
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  10. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    I only use the classics. My basic, "everyday" frames were made in 1988. I alternate occasionally with a model made in 1991, and goof around with various models made between 1960 and 1990.

    The newer models tend to be too light for my liking, and too stiff, and just have poor ball feel compared to the older classics I enjoy.
     
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  11. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    i must have improved a lot recently due to a lot of practice time (at least 3 hrs a day, every day of the week) . last night, i played with the adidas gtx pro and performed quite well with it, even on the volleys and overheads :shock:
     
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  12. SVP

    SVP Rookie

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    Our Beautiful Sport

    That's the beautiful thing about our sport: the melding of the distant past with the modern.
     
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  13. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    I played with the wison sting midsized. I really enjoyed playing with it and I loved the paint job. Too bad my coach wouldnt sell it to me
     
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  14. pshulam

    pshulam Hall of Fame

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    Used Stings are widely available for cheap. I sold two of them recently for $30.
     
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  15. pshulam

    pshulam Hall of Fame

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    All my racquets are considered old-schooled, made in the late 80s and early 90s.

    I do like to try the Head Youtek Prestige Mid, however.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2010
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  16. 007

    007 Professional

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    I use a 1997 Fischer VT98 Pro 330g because I have yet to find any racquet that comes close to having the superlative impact feel it has.
     
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  17. jorel

    jorel Hall of Fame

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    yes... sweet butter
     
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  18. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    the fischer M pro 105 is pretty good as well
     
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  19. jorel

    jorel Hall of Fame

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    blasphemy...
     
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  20. jorel

    jorel Hall of Fame

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    thats an interesting statement

    i wonder how Fed would do against a Williams sister if Fed used a woody and the sister used their reg raqcuet

    i think it might be close and a ratings grabber
     
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  21. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    More interesting would be Fed and Nadal playing with woodies.
     
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  22. jorel

    jorel Hall of Fame

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    i think Fed would destry him

    imo nadal cant hit his shots with a woodie but fed can
     
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  23. Tina

    Tina Banned

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    How do you define classical rackets? Any type of rackets before 2000?
     
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  24. mmaster

    mmaster Semi-Pro

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    well fed's racquet is actually more woodie like than anyone else's racquet on tour.
     
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  25. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    my defination is anything before the 1985.
    but that's my opinion and you know what they say about opinions. LOL
     
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  26. Keifers

    Keifers Legend

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    I played a lot of last year with a POG OS 1 stripe, from the late 70s-early 80s. Superb combination of power, control and feel/touch. Fave strings: VS gut mains with Gosen JC crosses.

    Trying to find a 95" frame that plays similarly (for better maneuverability and precision).
     
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  27. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    For me personally, it's any that were issued before 1990. The 1980's represents the decade of most interest though.
     
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  28. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    cool

    the 1970's were pretty good too with Jimbo and Chris.
     
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  29. kalic

    kalic Professional

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    '90s are the peak in racquet industry, IMHO.
     
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  30. Virginia

    Virginia Hall of Fame

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    You're obviously too young! :)
     
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  31. JT_2eighty

    JT_2eighty Hall of Fame

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    I agree. Although, I fall somewhere in the middle between classic and newer models. I've used the same PT280 since ~ '93, and every now and then someone will remark to me that I need to "get with the new technology, it will help your game." I actually decided to finally see what I was "missing" and demoed all kinds of new stuff last year, and wasn't impressed. Actually I ended up with mild tennis elbow from all those stiff, hollow-feeling, light-weight toys out there now, and am back to my 280/630s, playing the best I have in years.

    Only within the past year did I stumble onto this site and realize there's quite a big craze about my trusty racquet, so I feel it is a good one that sort of embodies the transition from classic to modern. Has the old-school comfort and feel with the ability to hang with and dish out modern power and spin.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2010
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  32. 000KFACTOR90000

    000KFACTOR90000 Professional

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    ......................
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2011
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  33. khw72004

    khw72004 Semi-Pro

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    I've been using the PT680 and love ever second of it
     
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  34. pshulam

    pshulam Hall of Fame

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    Do you mean PT630?
     
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  35. CollegeBound

    CollegeBound Rookie

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    No, no, no! It's the worst thing about our sport. We should have maintained our connection to the past by insisting on a limit to the materials used and the size of the racquets. If we'd followed the lead of baseball (minus the roids) we'd have a much stronger connection to the past and it'd be so much easier to compare players across the different eras.


    And I define 'classic' racquets as exactly that - racquets which are classics. That means they epitomise the high point of a particular era, not that they only relate to a specific point in time. I consider the Babolat Pure Drive a classic of the past decade just as I consider the PS 6.0 85 a classic of the 1980's and the wooden Maxply as a classic of multiple eras.
     
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  36. khw72004

    khw72004 Semi-Pro

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    yeah my mistake, I have 3 PT 280 and 3 630 in my bag
     
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  37. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Yep !
    Baseball and Tennis are quite different in terms of limiting technology allowed for the bats. Tennis would still be an allcourt game with serve and volley players if only wood tennis rackets were legal. Its really strange that non-wood bats are allowed at the non-professional levels of baseball. Its just hitting at plate, not running all over the court hitting. What Im getting at, is think if Pro tennis only allowed wood rackets but amateur tennis could use all the latest modern rackets ! Just think how strange it would be to all the players considering turning pro !
     
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  38. Michael B

    Michael B New User

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    You probably know this already but a tennis journalist invited a number of touring pros to try out some old wood frames. I think this was this in Indian Wells because both men and women were invited. None have ever used them and there were only a few who took up his invitation. Djokovic was one of the few and had the most interesting take, he said that if the pro players had to play with these they'd have to do much more than what they do now, namely play a full court game.
     
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