Does poly string cause wrist injury

Discussion in 'Pros' Racquets and Gear' started by Railbird, May 13, 2012.

  1. Railbird

    Railbird New User

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    I went to all poly instead of 50/50 and my wrist is throbbing. Maybe I should get an overgrip too? any suggestions or answers?
     
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  2. OskarDrakenberg

    OskarDrakenberg New User

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    well, poly strings is going to cause a bigger stress to your body even with a overgrip, if you are having problems with your wrist or other part like the shoulder you should just trash the poly and go with a 50/50 or a full gut.
     
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  3. Rusty669

    Rusty669 Semi-Pro

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    I'm afraid this is in the wrong section.
    You should have it moved to the strings area, you are bound to get more answers there...
    About your question: Poly can indeed cause wrist/elbow/shoulder pain, as it is a very stiff string(it obviously depends on what type of poly).
    If you are having problems with it, I'd advise you to cut it out and use a soft multi instead. Sure poly can be nice, but a full bed of it isn't very comfortable.
    A decent multi will stand you in better stead over the long haul!
     
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  4. loosegroove

    loosegroove Professional

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    Yeah, wrong section, but still I'll answer your question. I can have a somewhat sensitive wrist, but have not had any soreness for the past few months. So rather than doing a hybrid, I went with a full poly at low tension for my previous string job. It didn't work out. It felt fine on the court, but I could tell there was less comfort. When I got home and cooled down, my wrist was indeed slightly sore. Not bad, but enough where I realized just how much more comfy it was to use the same poly (which is a relatively comfy poly by the way) with soft synthetic gut in the crosses rather than a full bed.
     
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  5. gplracer

    gplracer Professional

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    After a very short period of time the poly goes dead. Then your wrist and elbow take all of the shock. Pro players get new rackets with new balls so it is not an issue.
     
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  6. Smasher08

    Smasher08 Hall of Fame

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    It's a bunch of things together that are causing pain/discomfort/injury. Your mechanics, racket head speed, and strings.

    The easiest thing to do is change your strings. It'll make the problems go away fast.

    Even the slightest mechanical flaws can potentially be amplified by the unforiving nature of poly to cause what you're experiencing.
     
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  7. Z-Man

    Z-Man Professional

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    Listen to your body and change the strings. I didn't, and as a result, I battled a wrist injury for several months. After your wrist is 100% for a month or two, try poly again at a lower tension. Poly is OK at lower tensions in softer racquets. Stiff racquet and stiff strings = trouble. String it down 10%.
     
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  8. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    That, equipment has minimum contribution to arm injuries. Mechanics and fitness are the primary players here.
     
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  9. Wuppy

    Wuppy Professional

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    I think that's very likely, unless you play 4 hours a day every day or something.
     
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  10. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    The thing speaks for itself.

    Lose the all poly.
     
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  11. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    Stiff, light rackets + stiff strings = arm problems.

    Doesn't matter if one is a tri-athlete. That is the combo platter of arm problems.

    Best = Heavy, head light, flexible frame. You can get away with stiff string with this type of frame.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2012
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  12. Wuppy

    Wuppy Professional

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    I very much doubt that. Maybe if you play a TON, but for the average club player playing 1-2 times a week, improper form is going to cause far more injuries than "vibrations" from light/stiff racquets and strings.
     
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  13. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    It isn't "vibrations." It is physics. :)

    Not saying poor technique can't play a role. But a setup that consists of a 10 to 11 ounce frame that is rather stiff combined with a stiff string is death to wrists, elbows and shoulders.

    In the OP's case, it seems obvious. He was okay, switched to all poly, then he was not okay. Ergo, all poly is the culprit.

    Patient: Doc, it hurts when I move my arm like this.
    Doctor: Then don't move your arm like that.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2012
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  14. maxpotapov

    maxpotapov Hall of Fame

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    Err, up to a point... Once poly goes dead, it hurts no matter what flex rating.
     
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  15. Wuppy

    Wuppy Professional

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    That just seems like such an overgeneralization I just don't buy it. Sorry.

    If you're young and in-shape and have decent form and a two-handed backhand, I don't think using a light, stiff frame with stiff strings is "death to wrists, elbows, and shoulders."

    Plenty of people use that setup and plenty of people have no problems whatsoever. That just seems like alarmism and such a broad-based statement that it's bound to be inaccurate.

    If you can point to some statistics I'll buy it.
     
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