doubles question

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by raiden031, Oct 12, 2007.

  1. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    If you are returning serve in doubles and notice your partner is standing in the front third of the service box, do you tell them to stand back near the service line or do you let them play however they like to play? This is assuming you don't regularly play with this person.
     
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  2. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    It depends.

    If she's good at net and I can keep my return away from the net man, it's not a big deal.

    The problem I have is partners who stand at the service line or near the doubles alley when I'm serving. I do tell them to move up/sideways. They usually do it. For a point or two. Then they drift back and over.

    What can you do?
     
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  3. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    Yeah but its nearly impossible to hit the ball if the returner gets poached. I can hold my own on a return, but I can't guarantee I'll never get poached.

    I don't mind if my partner stays on the service line, because it protects more from the lob than standing close. I like to S&V, so its really nice that they stay a little back.
     
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  4. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I think it is better for the receiver's partner to stand close to the service line and then close once the return makes it past the net man. No argument there.

    What I've noticed is that some people take something of a fixed position in the box. They don't move forward and back during the point in response to what is happening. If I have such a partner, I'd rather have her stand close to the net unless she has terrific low volleys. Many of my partners have volleys that are quite suspect.

    If I S&V, I tell my partner this so she knows I won't be in a good position to run down lobs she lets go.
     
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  5. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    I guess I try to avoid playing with people that are incapable of volleying when stand deeper in the service box. My OP was actually referring to a decent 3.0 male. I thought it was odd that he was standing like that, and I didn't notice it til later on in the match.
     
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  6. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    At 3.0, the guy is going to get lobbed, a lot. If he doesn't get the message, that's his issue. However, if by some miracle, he doesn't get lobbed, he will pretty effective since your returns are unlikely to be poached at that level and he will probably kill any mi55hits that end up going his way. It's a tradeoff...
     
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  7. Bagumbawalla

    Bagumbawalla Hall of Fame

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    It always amazes me that there are so many questions dealing with doubles pairs that cannot seenm to communicate or work together as a team to maximize their effectiveness.

    The better teams have played together enough to have an understanding of where they will be and what they will do under different circunstances. These are not revolutionary secrets-- mostly common sense tactics.

    Players who have not been together long need to talk. The less they have played together, the more thy need to talk.

    Of course, to be realistic, the abilities of the particular players must be taken into account.

    Normally, the more experienced player should take charge and start the communication process. It does not have to be blunt like, "You stand there and do this...." Get the player involved. Say, "What do you think about trying to stand here and move this way...."

    Communication-- if it improves the quality of play, everybody will be happy.
     
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  8. Tennismastery

    Tennismastery Professional

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    Back to the OP's question: I would highly recommend that they be told (respectfully) to back up. Unless you have a professional level return, you run the risk standing that close of getting pegged by either a poaching net man or if your partner hits a down the line that the net man can handle.

    "Hey George, you might want to stand back by the service line incase I float one or if Charly over there is poaching."

    Bagumbawalla had it correct with communication. Either your partner is unfamiliar with effective doubles play, or they just thought you were serving...or whatever the reason for them to play up that close on your return, you need to get them back.

    Ironically, this position is common among inexperiecned doubles players. You would be doing them a favor by teaching them where to play. This is such a common error among recreational players I dedicated a section of my book, TENNIS MASTERY to this once concept alone!

    Good luck!
     
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  9. Solat

    Solat Professional

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    one lesson per term of my adult group coaching goes purely to this position in doubles :)
     
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  10. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    If my partner is standing in doubles alley, I will tell them to move more center unless they are really bad. People that position poorly in doubles usually don't have much doubles experience so I do try to help them out in those regards. Some will stand too close to net when I am returning or won't move over to the center of their court when they are serving.
     
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  11. Doc Hollidae

    Doc Hollidae Hall of Fame

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    When receiving serve, the net man should be standing on the service line at the T.
     
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  12. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    If the opposing team has a huge serve with a quick poaching netman, you may want to have your partner play all the way back at the baseline in a more defensive position.
     
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