doubles strategy

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by itracbui3, Jul 16, 2009.

  1. itracbui3

    itracbui3 Rookie

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    anyone here have any good strategy for doubles to get easy points while serving and receiving?
     
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  2. SethIMcClaine

    SethIMcClaine Rookie

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    Stay together- if youre doing one up one back if one of you cross the court call switch

    If your serving have youre partner right on the net, if you notice the returns are coming back cross court stratigize with your partner to allow them to cross the front of the net

    receiving net man should be back in the service box a little to have a chance if their net man get a play on your return, if not then move up to the net.

    I just did a post on spotting your target, you can read over that one real quick too. http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=275174
     
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  3. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Have real good serves for both players (1st and 2nd). Anything else? :)
     
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  4. 10nistennis

    10nistennis Rookie

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    1. Serving and volleying.
    2. Poaching
    3. You and your partner getting to the net as soon as possible.
     
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  5. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    GIGO.......
     
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  6. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    A lob over net man's head is a nice play against alot of teams. Often the net player will stand RIGHT ON the net so its very easy to lob them. Though this won't work with all teams. But getting teams to switch is generally helpful..

    Pete
     
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  7. crystal_clear

    crystal_clear Professional

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    Can't agree more~:)
     
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  8. Bagumbawalla

    Bagumbawalla Hall of Fame

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    This question is uncomfortably close to the sort of question that goes something like-- I play a guy who is stronger than me, moves better, has a great serve and never misses a shot; so, how do I beat him?

    Ultimately, before considering the winning "strategy", you need tthe skills to execute the strategy. So evaluate your game.

    Do you have a strong serve that you can place where you want with spin and power to elicit a weak return?

    How is your return of serve? Can you drive it down the line or crosscourt equally well with your forehand or backhand? Can you hit a chip/dink that forces the server to scramble to the net?

    Can you serve and then get to the net and put the weak ball away or do you lag too long at the baseline?

    How are your volley skills? Can you hit the volley to the feet of the opponent, find the open court, jam it in to their body, drop it just over the net?

    If the opponents send up a lob, do you watch the ball sail over your head, or can you get back and win the point with an overhead smash?

    How is your footwork? Do you find yourself off balance, pulled about like a yo-yo, or can you anticipate well and move to the ball and place it to your advantage?

    Do you work well as a team, or more like two separate palyers accidently on the same court?

    If you don't have the basic skills, then, obviously, you will not be able to execute the strategies, anyway.

    If you do have those skills, then, yes, let's talk strategy.
     
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  9. SethIMcClaine

    SethIMcClaine Rookie

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    Umm... going to have to disagree with that.
    Yeah it works in some senarios, but I wouldnt put that as a straight-forward, up-front strategy. But when you notice that a return is going to be weak or returned from behind the baseline both players can usually take advantage of it by running up, sure!
     
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  10. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Well this will get you some easy points but it will also cost you some easy points. I think pros are wrong to stress attacking the net so much for recreational players that don't move well or hit good overheads.

    When you actually play a team that wants to win they won't have any qualms lobbing you to death. Whereas a "pro" will hit you flashy medium paced shots to volley to make you feel good..

    If your a HS varsity or league player you need to really think about your strategy in relation to your partners game - and your opponents. For example if your partner has a weak serve and the returner can hit some nice attacking shots you might be better off playing both back on second serve.

    If your playing with an older player who you know can't cover ANY lobs - then I like to stay back when serving. It all depends..

    Pete
     
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  11. Blake0

    Blake0 Hall of Fame

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    Big serve, great net game, good hands, and a hard flat return on the rise on second serve helps. Being able to lob well helps too..oh and i forgot to mention good reflexes :).

    Oh i forgot the most important thing..a good partner.
     
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  12. itracbui3

    itracbui3 Rookie

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    how would this strategy sound?
    starts out with both back then after the serve, both player runs up and pressure but make sure to watch the back just incase its a lob and cover both the allies and know whos getting the middle
     
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  13. MethodTennis

    MethodTennis Hall of Fame

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    slice lob their guy at the net move to net yourself back player returns with a weak shot usually(fodder for your racket)
     
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  14. 10nistennis

    10nistennis Rookie

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    Assuming this guy is a player who wants to get better, then yes, both volleying at the net is key to winning.

    What I mean by both players getting to the net as soon as possible is when the right opportunity shows itself, both players MUST come to the net, and ATTACK. This is the key to doubles. If you're already in an attack "mode" coming to the net, Your opportunities to hit a great volley is fairly easy, and your opponents probably won't hit a great lob back. This is then finished off with an easy overhead.


    Maybe if the OP is playing freshman or JV highschool tennis, this may not be their "key" strategy to win, be it because they don't have the skills for it, or it just isn't necessary because their opponents aren't that hard to beat by just playing one up one back.


    But when you reach varsity level tennis, both players must attack the net. Whoever controls the net usually will win the match. Plus, these kids are "usually" fit, athletic players, so chasing a lob won't be that much of a problem. Plus, these kids have the skills to chase down lobs, hit hard overheads, and attack the net effectively.
     
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  15. itracbui3

    itracbui3 Rookie

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    im a varsity at my highschool and both me and my partner could do the "back to the net smash" just in case theres a lob :)
     
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  16. Rui

    Rui Rookie

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    Do you mean server and partner stay back and then run forward after the serve? If so, I don't like it. Why give the returner an easy return by not having a netman to care about.

    If you mean returner and partner stay back and then run forward after opponent's serve, I still don't like it. It's easy to hit to the feet of the approaching team.
     
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  17. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Ahh I didn't realize the guy was a HS varsity player. Yeah an attacking style is pretty good then. Still I would caution them not to just run up to the net. You need to split step before the opponent hits the return. Else they will easily lob over them..
     
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  18. vndesu

    vndesu Hall of Fame

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    practice a faster serve and volley game, or set your partner up with a placed serve and let him take the put away
     
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  19. SethIMcClaine

    SethIMcClaine Rookie

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    During your own serve, having the other team mate at the next is one of the quickest and easiest ways to score points. Good serves force bad returns which allow the net man easy plays. Start one up, one back, and after the serve start to move together, if the other team is stuck in the back court both move up, if the other team is starting to move up start moving back (this is a general concept though, you have to work out stratagies with your partner and learn how they play, their strengths and weaknesses, as well as your own)
     
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  20. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    This is an excellent reply, as the answer to your question is not only dependent on your skills, but that of your opponents.

    That said, Kick serves to the body and down the middle can really set up your net man to do some damage.
    As for receiving, I have my HS players focus on getting a high % of returns in play, which will force the servers to work harder to "earn" holding serve. With good effort, there is a good chance the servers will falter a few times along the way.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2009
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