Drills to fix too long takeback on forehand

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Failed, Jan 16, 2012.

  1. Failed

    Failed Semi-Pro

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    Need drills and tips :)
     
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  2. aimr75

    aimr75 Hall of Fame

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    Just turn with shoulders and don't engage the arms during the unit turn
     
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  3. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

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    Stand next to the fence.
     
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  4. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

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    duplicate post
     
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  5. jmnk

    jmnk Professional

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    I've tried that. I'm assuming you mean, if i'm right handed, I should stand next to left fence (not the fence behind me), so I would know every time my racket goes behind my back too much.
    The problem is to have someone feed you the balls for an hour :). I find ball machine not accurate enough to be able to place the ball in exact same spot as needed every time. I suppose self-drop would work to some extend.
    Also, when standing next to the fence you can't really properly follow through, can you?
    I have also tried standing sideways to the net, with body on one side and the hand on the other side of the net. That way you can't hit if the racket were to move too much behind the back. But same problem with ball feeding....
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2012
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  6. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter Legend

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    Exactly! You can also keep your left hand on the throat of the racquet until you're ready to turn back toward the ball.
     
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  7. jmnk

    jmnk Professional

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    I do not know about OP, but that does not help me. I do try to keep my left hand on the racket. But apparently I let it go too soon, so if I let my left hand go and even if it is parallel to the baseline, my right arm tends to go back behind my back, rather than basically doing a loop in front of me (I say in front since I'm turned to the side at this point). I just never learnt properly and I can't fix it :( . The thing is if I have not seen myself on the recording I would swear my racket never goes behind my back - but in fact it almost always does.
     
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  8. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    As Ash mentioned, you can back up to the fence -I don't care too much for that type of approach but it works,

    I like having the player keep the off hand (thumb & forfinger) on the racquet head until the ball bounces - works well & easily incorporated into actual play.
     
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  9. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter Legend

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    You misunderstood what I said: I said keep the left hand on the throat of the racquet throughout the backswing - with your back visible to the opponent - until you begin your forward rotation and forward swing.
     
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  10. jmnk

    jmnk Professional

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    ok, I'm confused. If I stand next to the back fence I can't really do any takeback at all. If i stand next to the side fence I can do takeback but I can't follow through. Would you care to explain please?
     
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  11. jmnk

    jmnk Professional

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    Oh, I see. I'll try that, essentially keeping the off-hand on the racket much longer, till, as you have said, I start the forward motion. Thanks.
     
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  12. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Sure. As I mentioed. I'm not a fan of using the fences although it does work as a training aid. Bassicaly, it provents the player from using a huge takeback - fence would be to your rear (not the side). The player is positioned a couple of feet in front of fence - if they take a big takeback they strike the fence in the process. I've become too aware of having players taking swings too close to wire fences - racquets aren't getting cheaper & I end up returning too many.

    I happen to prefer keeping the off hand on the racuest hoop/rim untill the ball bounces. With the off hand on the racquet the takeback is limited. Some like to keep the off hand on the throat but I've had better luck with it a little higher on the frame.

    Hope that answers your question.
     
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