Every paceless ball is another chance to "serve"?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by ktncnttl, Jun 9, 2005.

  1. ktncnttl

    ktncnttl Rookie

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    When a pro sees a paceless ball, he usually goes for the winner like he would a serve. In a way a serve is like hitting a high paceless ball. In theory, a paceless (and spinless) ball should be the easiest to handle. You should be able to change direction and add pace at will. However in reality, a paceless ball is hard to handle and many people like pace. My question is how come most people have no trouble serving a paceless ball but the same people have so much trouble hitting a paceless ball in a rally? Is it a matter of confidence?
     
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  2. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Its mostly about geometry. Serves are hit at full reach extension with the simplist timing of all strokes since the server tosses to his/her liking. That hitting angle to the receivers box allows for higher percentage winners (aces) Overheads are similar but require more timing and can be hit anywhere in the opponents court, which is why they are also usually result in winners. Soft paceless hits or chips require the hitter to lift over the net and hit to high percentage spots on the receivers court while generating power. Thus hitting winners off of paceless groundstokes is much more challenging than serving or hitting overheads.
     
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  3. Geezer Guy

    Geezer Guy Hall of Fame

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    In a match, you'll probably hit over a hundred serves - each one against a paceless ball. You probably even practice serving on "off" days. You're very used to it.

    In a match, how many paceless balls will be hit to you? Not very many. When you practice against a ball machine or wall, how many paceless balls will you get? None.

    If you have trouble with paceless balls, I'd say it's because you're not used to them.

    Besides that, when you serve, you toss the ball right where you want it to be. In a rally you have to run to hit the ball.
     
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  4. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    I'd rather get a short, paceless ball and put it away rather than serve against a great returner.
     
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  5. ktncnttl

    ktncnttl Rookie

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    So you are saying it is a matter of confidence and a paceless ball is actually a good chance to hit a winner?
     
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  6. datsveryinterestin

    datsveryinterestin Rookie

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    It "should" be pretty easy to put away a dead paceless, short ball ... but since I don't practice that shot, I often miss the hitting zone and put them long or in the net. Very Frustrating!
    But I see the shot in my mind that I want to do, but since I only get that shot once in a while... I am just not executing it and I look like the WORST tennis player ever when you go for a winner on a short ball and have all the time in the world and BLOW it.
    If I had a coach, I would have them feed me balls that are dead sitters before the service line... but right now I don't.

    But there is really nothing terribly hard about the shot... you just have to have the confidence to pull it off.
     
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  7. TwistServe

    TwistServe Guest

    I never really practiced hitting paceless balls.. it just sort of came together after hitting thousands of balls.. After a while it just comes together. You just sort of know how hard, how much spin, or how flat you need to put on a ball to put it away. When you've been around the tennis ball for a while you can do anything to it.

    I think part of training for tennis is just getting out there and hitting as many balls as you can... the strokes you dont practice some how also improve.

    I took 4 months off my one handed backhand to improve my 2hander.. When I came back to the one hander, it was even stronger than before and now it's almost as strong as my forehand. I think its because my balance improved and my understanding of the backhand improved.
     
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  8. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    I'm saying that a paceless ball gives you a great shot to hit a winner. The only exception would be on a Coria like dropshot where you have to chase down the ball and it dies on you from the backspin. The intentional paceless ball is not an easy putaway.
     
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  9. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    Er, I disagree with your original premise.
    Most people have LOTS of trouble serving a paceless ball, so much trouble in fact, they are given TWO chances to hit one into the service box.
     
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  10. erik-the-red

    erik-the-red Semi-Pro

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    In my opinion this is a true gauge of how good you really are.

    Once a person has discovered how to hit on the rise, then he can use this technique against hard-hitters to make himself look like he's a hard hitter, especially if his opponent hits flat. You can siphon a lot of pace off the return.

    A no-pace dinker serve common among 3.0 players is hard to return BECAUSE it has no pace. You have to do all the footwork to get to it, you have to transfer your weight, and you have to supply all the pace BY YOURSELF.
     
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  11. equinox

    equinox Hall of Fame

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    If i serve fast pace to women players and more often than not the ball comes back.

    If i kick the ball up head height with medium pace they really struggle to control the return.

    I don't try to hit clean winners off slow paced "dink" serves.

    Instead i focus on depth of shot and finishing of the weak reply with winning volleys.
     
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  12. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    I don't think a paceless ball with depth is all that easy to hit a winner off. I prefer to just hit it back deep crosscourt with moderate pace. I practice hitting paceless balls by dropping on both the backhand and forehand sides when starting practice rallies. That definitely has helped my backhand learn how to drive a paceless ball deep.
     
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  13. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

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    I agree.

    Just a can of worms or Pandora's box, if not careful:)
     
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  14. Tennis Ball Hitter

    Tennis Ball Hitter Semi-Pro

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    on a normal paced shot, the returner can use the exisitng pace of the ball so they can concentrate mainly on putting spin on the ball to keep it in [and direction].

    On a slow paceless ball [one that does not bounce higher than the net] the returner has to produce both pace and spin [and direction]. On top of this the returners timing is generally off because they have to move closer to the ball compared to normal.

    AND also, depending on what level you play at you will also probably try to hit the cover off the ball ... which is what I generally try and do.
     
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