Fed's 1/2 volley groundstrokes and why they work...

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by perfmode, Nov 22, 2004.

  1. perfmode

    perfmode Hall of Fame

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    How exactly does he get away with 1/2 volleying a one hander that's even better than Agassi's? It's unbelievable. Even Hewitt was saying that Fed is unbelieveable.

    That's coming from the #2 player (right now) in the world.



    How exactly does he get away with it? I can understand the FH side. He comes in at the ball relatively flat and hits through the ball but his BH side looks just like any other great one hander. What do you guys think? I'm just amazed. BB, maybe you can explain it a bit. You know a lot more about this than I do.
     
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  2. @wright

    @wright Hall of Fame

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    Federer has impeccable timing. That is the thing that makes or breaks a half-volley. If you can time it right, you add power to your shots AND rob your opponent of valuable reaction time. He hits flat or with heavy spin off both sides, which helps keep his opponents guessing even more.
     
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  3. jun

    jun Semi-Pro

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    he recoginizes such balls really fast, very very good hands, and coordination...

    it's pretty much talent, and years of practicing.
     
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  4. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    I think it's just plain luck.
     
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  5. perfmode

    perfmode Hall of Fame

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    I guess that makes Mirka the epitome of lady luck. He never misses.
     
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  6. Golden Retriever

    Golden Retriever Hall of Fame

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    I think Federer probably knew where to hit the ball BEFORE the ball bounced and acted on it. That means he swings at the ball before the ball bounces. He is probably the only man in the world who can do that on a consistent basis.
     
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  7. Lambsscroll

    Lambsscroll Professional

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    I think with his small grip and of course his talent, shots like this are possible.

    He manipulates the ball with his wrist.
     
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  8. The tennis guy

    The tennis guy Hall of Fame

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    Anticipation, footwork, and hand-eye coordination.
     
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  9. perfmode

    perfmode Hall of Fame

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    Yeah. His swing begins before the ball hits the ground on a regular basis.
     
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  10. gully

    gully Semi-Pro

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    Aside from footwork, and the lack of a natural slide, isn't this one of the reasons that Agassi won the French only once -- that the surface neutralizes, if only a little, his ability to hit a punishing short-hop ball?

    For Federer, though, there are enough other weapons so that the lack of this one should not hurt him at Roland Garros. There, the difficulty may come from the great number of excellent specialists lurking in the draw and the difficulty of making the decisions about when, and how, to come in -- decisions that Sampras found difficult to make consistently (at least over a two-week period).
     
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  11. SliceServe

    SliceServe New User

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    Many of good responses:

    Timing
    Anticipation
    Footwork
    Hand-eye coordination

    But your just looking at the technical reasons. Most important.... He has incredible CONFIDENCE in his strokes to be able to pull these shots off time and time again.

    Safin utterly "blasted" many balls within inches of the baseline and Fed hit right through them and returned them deep with pace. This is one of the reasons why Fed is above and beyond the rest of the pack. You simply can not push him off the baseline regardless how deep and hard the ball is struck. This is the complete opposite match strategy of Roddick (15 feet behind the baseline during rallies) I'm sure there are many pro's in the top 50 that can pull this off in practice but lack the confidence to successfully pull it off in real match play. Aggasi was able to do it. McEnroe also picked the ball right off the court during baseline rallies but no where near the explosive power of Federer.

    I got a kick when during the after match interview he mentioned that he came into this tournament "unprepared due to injury". So this is how he plays unprepared? Come on 2005. I want to see someone win the Grand Slam in my lifetime.
     
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  12. perfmode

    perfmode Hall of Fame

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    Seriously. We all doubted him when we found out about his leg (thigh?) injury a few weeks ago but he amazed us once again. Maybe he's just a modest guy.
     
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  13. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Federer uses his wrist a lot on his backhands and is able to roll over the ball on half-volley backhands, imparting quite a bit of topspin on the shot. He's able to hit successful crosscourt passing shots with this stroke because he robs his opponent of time in getting to the net by half-volleying the shot. The topspin then causes the ball to dip before his opponent is close enough to the net to make a good volley, making it extremely difficult for his opponent to even get their racquet on the passing shot. :shock:
     
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  14. JohnThomas1

    JohnThomas1 Professional

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    Unreal talent and timing.
     
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  15. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    BB only posts in the tennis tips section so I don't think you'll get a response in this thread from him.
     
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  16. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    Exactly SliceServe...exactly. Timing and confidence. Timing and confidence. Think about it Perfmode, you answered your own question...it's not mechanical magic on the backhand side....he does the same thing on forehand side. He does not have special tweaks on both sides that only he knows. The key is timing and timing comes from within. Someone also pointed out that Mac and Agassi did the same thing....so did Connors...you can't find a bigger variety of strokes than that group. They all new how to play great tennis though. That is a pervasive problem I always see in TW, in the instruction forum. The guys there dont' understand that the most important thing in tennis is not intellectually breaking down strokes. Great tennis doesn't come from this and in fact will be held back by this. Now, I like to do that purely out of tennis curiousity but with the understanding that if anything, my game will suffer if I try to do that on court.

    Naturally great mechanics are invaluable. But great mechanics are natural. They happen automatically. That is where the ideal models came from in the 1st place. From great athletes doing the natural movements the human body was inheritantly designed for.
     
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