Fish Oil : the most beneficial supplement for your health.!!

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Ano, Jul 4, 2007.

  1. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    If you're up-to-date on your nutrition-for-health reading, you're well aware of the benefits of fish oil.

    Based on undeniable scientific evidence and anecdotal evidence, I strongly encourage you to incorporate into your diet two specific omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA), commonly referred to as fish oils.

    EPA and DHA deficiencies have been linked to problems that include, but are certainly not limited to heart disease, hypertension, arthritis, cancer, immune disorders, chronic intestinal disorders, growth retardation, liver disorders, skin lesions, reproductive failure, visual problems, kidney disorders, and neurological disorders (1).

    Fish oil is beneficial for :

    Cardiovascular Health/Atherosclerosis/Hyperlipidemia

    Hypertension

    Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Inflammatory Diseases of Joints and Connective Tissues

    Osteoporosis

    Kidney Disease/Renal Failure

    Prostate Cancer

    Colon Cancer

    Breast Cancer

    Skin Cancer

    Crohn's Disease

    Ulcerative Colitis

    Asthma

    Cystic Fibrosis

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Sickle Cell Anemia

    Menstrual Symptoms

    Vision/Eye problems (glaucoma)

    Multiple Sclerosis

    prenatal and postpartum support

    Psoriasis

    Photosensitivity

    Diabetes/Insulin Resistance

    Resting Metabolic Rate

    Body Composition Regulation and Leptin:

    Psychological Disorders

    The Response to Stress

    Migraine Headaches

    Epilepsy

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

    Fibromyaglia

    Cirrhosis


    If you aren't taking fish oil, consult your doctor and start taking it.

    The typical fish oil capsule you'll encounter is 1000 mg fish oil; we, however, are more concerned with the EPA and DHA content of that 1000 mg. In most cases, you'll find 180 mg EPA and 120 mg DHA per capsule.

    A good rule of thumb (especially based on the results of the clinical trials) is to consume 3-6 g combined EPA and DHA per day; at this capsule size, you'd need 10-20 capsules per day. For this reason, liquid fish oil is a great alternative.

    A small percentage of people will suffer from fish burps with the EPA/DHA supplementation; if you're one of those individuals, I recommend you take all your fish oil with your last meal of the day. That way, if you have salmon belches, they'll be in your sleep! Another alternative is to just eat fatty fish every day, but that can get old very quickly!

    Finally, be patient! If you read the finer details of all of the studies that I will outline, you'll realize that the majority of them were at least 6-8 weeks in duration (usually longer).

    Your body needs time to make good use of these healthy raw materials, so count on a few months before you see noticeable results if you have one of the aforementioned conditions. For the rest of you who are healthy, you probably won't notice much, but I think that you'll be even healthier in the long run.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2007
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  2. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    Some of you might think I am lying, right?

    No, I am not.

    Here are the references :


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    3. Burdge GC, Wootton SA. Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in young women. Br J Nutr. 2002 Oct;88(4):411-20.

    4. Colgan, M. Optimum Sports Nutrition. New York: Advanced Research Press, 1993.

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    35. Barbosa DS, Cecchini R, El Kadri MZ, Rodriguez MA, Burini RC, Dichi I. Decreased oxidative stress in patients with ulcerative colitis supplemented with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids. Nutrition. 2003 Oct;19(10):837-42.

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    37. Nagakura T, Matsuda S, Shichijyo K, Sugimoto H, Hata K. Dietary supplementation with fish oil rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in children with bronchial asthma. Eur Respir J. 2000 Nov;16(5):861-5.

    38. Mickleborough TD, Murray RL, Ionescu AA, Lindley MR. Fish oil supplementation reduces severity of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003 Nov 15;168(10):1181-9. Epub 2003 Aug 06.

    39. De Vizia B, Raia V, Spano C, Pavlidis C, Coruzzo A, Alessio M. Effect of an 8-month treatment with omega-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic) in patients with cystic fibrosis. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2003 Jan-Feb;27(1):52-7.

    40. Shahar E, Folsom AR, Melnick SL, Tockman MS, Comstock GW, Gennaro V, Higgins MW, Sorlie PD, Ko WJ, Szklo M. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study Investigators. N Engl J Med. 1994 Jul 28;331(4):228-33.

    41. Romieu I, Trenga C. Diet and obstructive lung diseases. Epidemiol Rev. 2001;23(2):268-87.

    42. Tomer A, Kasey S, Connor WE, Clark S, Harker LA, Eckman JR. Reduction of pain episodes and prothrombotic activity in sickle cell disease by dietary n-3 fatty acids. Thromb Haemost. 2001 Jun;85(6):966-74.

    43. Glew RH, Casados JK, Huang YS, Chuang LT, VanderJagt DJ. The fatty acid composition of the serum phospholipids of children with sickle cell disease in Nigeria. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2002 Oct;67(4):217-22.

    44. Deutch B. [Painful menstruation and low intake of n-3 fatty acids]. Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Jul 15;158(29):4195-8. [Article in Danish]

    45. Cellini M, Caramazza N, Mangiafico P, Possati GL, Caramazza R. Fatty acid use in glaucomatous optic neuropathy treatment. Acta Ophthalmol Scand Suppl. 1998; (227): 41-2.

    46. Cunnane SC, Ho SY, Dore-Duffy P, Ells KR, Horrobin DF. Essential fatty acid and lipid profiles in plasma and erythrocytes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Am J Clin Nutr. 1989 Oct;50(4):801-6.

    47. Gallai V, Sarchielli P, Trequattrini A, Franceschini M, Floridi A, Firenze C, Alberti A, Di Benedetto D, Stragliotto E. Cytokine secretion and eicosanoid production in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MS patients undergoing dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. J Neuroimmunol. 1995 Feb;56(2):143-53.

    48. Smuts CM, Huang M, Mundy D, Plasse T, Major S, Carlson SE. A randomized trial of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation during the third trimester of pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Mar;101(3):469-79.
     
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  3. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    49. Stene LC, Joner G; Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Study Group. Use of cod liver oil during the first year of life is associated with lower risk of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes: a large, population-based, case-control study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Dec;78(6):1128-34.

    50. Malcolm CA, McCulloch DL, Montgomery C, Shepherd A, Weaver LT. Maternal docosahexaenoic acid supplementation during pregnancy and visual evoked potential development in term infants: a double blind, prospective, randomised trial. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2003 Sep;88(5):F383-90.

    51. Uauy R, Hoffman DR, Mena P, Llanos A, Birch EE. Term infant studies of DHA and ARA supplementation on neurodevelopment: results of randomized controlled trials. J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4 Suppl):S17-25.

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    54. Williams MA, Zingheim RW, King IB, Zebelman AM. Omega-3 fatty acids in maternal erythrocytes and risk of preeclampsia. Epidemiology. 1995 May; 6(3): 232-7.

    55. Mayser P, Mrowietz U, Arenberger P, Bartak P, Buchvald J, Christophers E, Jablonska S, Salmhofer W, Schill WB, Kramer HJ, Schlotzer E, Mayer K, Seeger W, Grimminger F. Omega-3 fatty acid-based lipid infusion in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis: results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1998 Apr;38(4):539-47.

    56. Grimminger F, Mayser P, Papavassilis C, Thomas M, Schlotzer E, Heuer KU, Fuhrer D, Hinsch KD, Walmrath D, Schill WB, et al. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of n-3 fatty acid based lipid infusion in acute, extended guttate psoriasis. Rapid improvement of clinical manifestations and changes in neutrophil leukotriene profile. Clin Investig. 1993 Aug;71( 8 ) :634-43.

    57. Rhodes LE, White SI. Dietary fish oil as a photoprotective agent in hydroa vacciniforme. Br J Dermatol. 1998 Jan;138(1):173-8.

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    62. Mori, T. A., Bao, D. Q., Burke, V., Puddey, I. B., Watts, G. F., and Beilin, L. J. Dietary fish as a major component of a weight-loss diet: effect on serum lipids, glucose, and insulin metabolism in overweight hypertensive subjects. Am J Clin Nutr 70(5), 817-25. 1999.

    63. Rivellese AA, Maffettone A, Iovine C, Di Marino L, Annuzzi G, Mancini M, Riccardi G. Long-term effects of fish oil on insulin resistance and plasma lipoproteins in NIDDM patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Diabetes Care. 1996 Nov;19(11):1207-13.

    64. Woodman RJ, Mori TA, Burke V, Puddey IB, Watts GF, Beilin LJ. Effects of purified eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids on glycemic control, blood pressure, and serum lipids in type 2 diabetic patients with treated hypertension. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Nov;76(5):1007-15.

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  4. Zets147

    Zets147 Banned

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    Yes sir, I shall go out and buy fish oil right away.
    My Big bro just annihilated his fish oil inventory yesterday, I believe.

    Thanks for the information.
     
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  5. dave333

    dave333 Hall of Fame

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    Do teens need take it? My dad uses fish oil and it doesn't smell all that great.
     
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  6. dcottrill

    dcottrill Rookie

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    I don't think anyone has ever suspected Ano of lying.:)
     
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  7. EricW

    EricW Professional

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    I would recommend you eat flax seed as a source for these omega-3's instead of fish oil because it will give the same benefits except fish can be contaminated... flax seed wouldn't be
     
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  8. Chauvalito

    Chauvalito Hall of Fame

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    Thank you for the scientific references...so often many people fail to provide references on the board.
     
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  9. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    One note about fish oil is that quality is absolutely crucial. Most store bought fish oils are very low in quality and consequently very ineffective.

    I disagree about flax though.

    I actually take krill oil.

    http://www.mercola.com/products/krill_oil.htm
     
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  10. xtremerunnerars

    xtremerunnerars Hall of Fame

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    Flax seed could just as easily be contaminated. Pesticides anyone?
     
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  11. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    Could be, regarding fish oil contamination, but I'd prefer see something a bit more objective about krill oil than an ad from the company selling it.
     
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  12. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Well I was kind of just posting where you can get it. I don't make royalties from the brand. I just recommend the product.
     
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  13. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    Oh, okay. I normally try to read up a bit on supplements before (usually) not purchasing them. But I used to buy them...when I was more naive.
     
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  14. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Udo's. Flax seed must be converted by the body, and the conversion rates are fairl low as I recall. I eat tons of flax seed (on my cereal and in protein shakes), but I also take fish oil caps.

    I tried taking 5 grams of fish oil a day, but my blood pressure dropped way too low. I was getting dizzy standing up suddenly, so I'm down to 2 grams per day.

    Good stuff.

    -Robert
     
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  15. Sleepstream

    Sleepstream Semi-Pro

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    I disagree, but only because I believe people should eat more fish (like wild salmon) on a regular basis instead of taking fish oil capsules.
     
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  16. richw76

    richw76 Rookie

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    What fish oil brand do you use. Are there any Brands that have a better reputation, as high quality, low contamination?
     
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  17. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    So you don't use supplements then. You just came by to tell users that they're naive?

    If our society encouraged better nutrition it would be easier to obtain quality nutrients, but instead I find it easier to take a few supplements.
     
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  18. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    I buy Udo's. You can find it online. It's recommended by Will Brink, which is good enough for me.

    -Robert
     
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  19. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    Ask you dad to buy Carlson fish oil (not capsules). It has lemon taste.

    Take 1 teaspoon with breakfast.

    Oh, yes, teens need to it.
     
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  20. xtremerunnerars

    xtremerunnerars Hall of Fame

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    So...are we saying udo's or carlson is the best?
     
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  21. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    I would say, take both. ;)

    Take 2 teaspoon of carlson oil, and 1 tablespoon of Udo's Oil a day.
     
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  22. Stuyten

    Stuyten Guest

    Can you give examples of fatty fish?
     
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  23. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    herring, mackerel, salmon, anchovy, trout.
     
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  24. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    Here's another interesting info about fish oil.

    Charles Poliquin (one of the most succesfull strength coaches in the world, he has trained more than 400 Olympic athletes) in an interview said :

    " I was first introduced to fish oil twelve years ago by my friend Mauro DiPasquale MD. I was over at his house and he had fish oil on the counter. I asked him what he used it for and he said, "Charles, this is the most important supplement ever."

    He told me to go to Medline and punch in any disease known to man and the words "fish oil" beside it. He challenged me to find a study that didn't show how fish oil could benefit in the treatment of any disease. I gave up after 86 studies!

    There was a study published four years ago that showed that if the US government issued three grams of fish oil per day to American citizens, then the amount of cancer and heart disease would go down by 50% within one year.

    My athletes would often recognize each other when sitting around a table because those I'd be training would break out the fish oil during the meal. That's how I got the nickname "the fish oil guy" among athletes. But that's also how I get people so lean so fast.

    Anyone who wants to put on muscle and lose fat should be on 30-45 grams of fish oil per day. That's just three tablespoons of fish oil. It would be a pain in the ass with capsules though because that's around 45 capsules per day, but it's easy with a straight oil
    ."

    EDIT : I personally do not recommend any of you to take 30-45 fish oil capsules/day. This post is for informational purposes only.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2007
    #24
  25. EricW

    EricW Professional

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    Ano, due to your interest in nutrition, I suggest you read everything on this site:

    www.drmcdougall.com: You can also go to the forums, seeing posts from tons of people who follow his advice/teachings

    I prefer flax seed over fish oil, because I don't beleive fish is a health food. One of the reaosns is the high level of contamination.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2007
    #25
  26. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    I don't use them now, but I've used, probably, scores of supplements over the years and spent $1,000's. Finally, based on my reading, experience with them and the lack of any discernable result other than a lightened wallet, came to the conclusion that the supplement/homeopathic/health food industry is one of the biggest scams going in America today. I'm surprised such a skeptic as yourself would fall for it, but the promise of a pill or powder replacing or supplumenting hard work or real food is too much for anyone to pass up. It's all snake oil. The industry preys on people's insecurity, vulnerability and basic laziness. So of course it's easier to take suppluments and feel you are getting something, but it's not society's responsibility to encourage good nutrition. It's up to the individual...it's your body...why would you trust what "society" tells you about this?
     
    #26
  27. Craig Sheppard

    Craig Sheppard Hall of Fame

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    WOW. I've taken Omega-3/Fish Oil capsules daily for at least a year now, but I've only been getting about 360 mg EPA and 240 DHA (2 capsules). Would you say this really is of no benefit then?

    So the trials have all been based on 3-6g, not the normal capsules? Any info on the efficacy of OTC capsules? It sounds like a huge serving... even much more than you'd see in a good salmon portion. (Maybe I'm wrong about that)
     
    #27
  28. ShooterMcMarco

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    Do you know of any good quality fish oil brands? I heard 7 seas is one of the best.
     
    #28
  29. todd03blown

    todd03blown Rookie

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    interesting post and great information
     
    #29
  30. El Diablo

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    Fish oil may merely be the supplement industry's response to the decline of vitamin E, which was the miracle supplement of the prior decade. Now we have studies published in good refereed journals demonstrating DECREASED survival rates in the vitamin E subjects in controlled studies, and concern that the anticoagulant effects of vitamin E may be hazardous in a world of mini-dose aspirin, Plavix, and coumadin takers.
    So along comes fish oil, accompanied by the usual hype (as in hyperbole). Statements like the one above about a "study" purporting to demonstrate that fish oil rations given to the people would reduce cancer and heart disease by 50% within a year exemplify the sort of absurd claims native to the supplement industry. Absurd because a "study" can't demonstrate something so wildly speculative without making ludicrous assumptions. I was raised on and still take supplements, including fish oil, but I've also read some of the studies referenced above and found a number of them poorly done and inconclusive. I ran a clinical psychopharmacology research unit some years ago and learned quickly that the medical literature is replete with many studies to support BOTH sides of any question you can pose.
     
    #30
  31. El Diablo

    El Diablo Hall of Fame

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    Addendum -- the Emory (University) Healthcare website, and numerous others, references a large number of studies demonstrating no benefit from fish oil on some of the conditions listed above.
     
    #31
  32. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    I agree with you for the most part, but don't feel it's prudent to generalize. Not all supplements are created equal. The bottom line is that the supplement is either good for the body or not. I try to aim for those that are good.
     
    #32
  33. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Mmm, those clinical studies though were done specifically in studies related to lowering cholesterol and possibly insulin resistance. For normal daily, the recommended is actually about half that. That said, there should be no problems going into the 3-6g range, provided you don't have problems with blood thinning, and it may even advisable if you're actively training.

    Poliquin's recommendations always raise my eye, but apparently some others are also corroborating that. I've done high dosages a few times, and well when you do that, your brain kicks up another level of concentration (probably due to all the DHA), and your sleep needs go way way down. It's an expensive alternative to coffee, but it works.

    The most important thing is to make sure there's no cholesterol or vitamin A in your fish oil. Lack of both means that the fish oil has gone through at least molecular distillation, so that all of the contaminants are gone, and the concentration of EPA/DHA is higher. Also, there's less long chain fatty acids, so it's easier on the stomach.

    I like doing the fish oil + Udo thing. But, the third component is to supplement with additional GLA (evening primrose oil), especially if you're older. EPA improves the PGE1+PGE3 to PGE2 ratio, but it also lowers overall prostaglandin count. GLA bumps it back up, while the EPA still keeps PGE2 really low. GLA supplementation varies individual to individual; usually you use your skin as an indicator if you're getting the right amount. On a normal day, it should feel soft. If it's unusually dry or splotchy, you want more GLA. If it's oily, you want less. A little bit goes a long way.

    Finally, the more polyunsaturates you take, the more antioxidants from food sources you want to take.
     
    #33
  34. lethalfang

    lethalfang Professional

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    A certain fish oil from cold water fish, omega-3, is correlated with a decrease of cardiovascular diseases. It thins the blood, thus heart attacks, etc. are less likely. If I remember correctly, the correlation was first noticed in Denmark. I'm not sure if there is absolute proof for this, but there is enough circumstantial evidence to suggest that Omega-3 is in fact beneficial.
    It's true that many fish itself may contain an elevated amount of mercury, a toxin, because companies dump crap into our water. So eating salmon everyday MAY increase risks.
     
    #34
  35. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    I wouldn't say this really is of no benefit. I would say, taking 10 capsules or 2 teaspoon will give you more benefit.

    100 grams of salmon contains 1.2 - 1.4 grams (the total amount of EPA plus DHA). Your goal is to get about 3 grams (the total amound of EPA plus DHA) a day, and at the same time reducing your intake of Omega-6 (vegetable oils such as corn oil, safflower oil, sunflower seed oil, cottonseed oil, soyben oil, peanut oil, sesame oil, grapeseed oil, borage oil)

    If you are really interested to learn more about this topic (Omega-3), I strongly recommend a book called THE OMEGA DIET by Artemis Simopoulos, MD. The book is easy to read.

    If you want to really enhance your knowledge about fats, read FATS THAT HEAL, FATS THAT KILL by Udo Erasmus PhD. This book is NOT easy to read, because it contains heavy chemistry lesson.

    EDIT : There are some people who should consult their doctors before taking more than one gram of omega-3 per day :

    1. people with asthma should take them only under close supervision by their doctor. While these nutrients have been highly beneficial for some asthmatics, they have increased bronchial sensitivity in others.

    2. People with diabetes sould take no more than 3 grams per day becauise higher amount might disrupt glucose regulation

    3. People with clotting disorders or who are taking very potent blood thinners should not take omega-3 unless precribed by a physician.

    Remember, consult your doctor first.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2007
    #35
  36. Kobble

    Kobble Hall of Fame

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    Supplements for the most part are way overrated, or useless.

    Green tea- Yes, it works, guaranteed, IN VITRO. How much you really absorb to get an effective does in your system is another story.

    Now, fish oil is very interesting to me. Plenty of evidence shows that people defficient are more likely to develop certain disorders, especially mental disorders(A.D.D.) in children. From what I have read fish oil is a good idea. I would have to re-read some serious data to be able to talk the talk when it comes to the facts. I am not, however, so sure I buy into the purity(my fish oil is greater than yours) thing. Most stuff I have come across concerning purity is related to a company somehow. Most articles will have two characteristics, push a company, and recommended(usually high) dose. Basically, to get you to use a hefty amount of one product. Creatine has made this practice famous. A while ago I was taking a fish oil made by Twinlab, and they cited a study which suggests a dose of only one tablespoon a day is necessary for a benefit of greater chance of cardiovascular health. I am more likely to believe that than some guy pushing it for fat loss, muscle gain, and penis size. Just be sensible, and look for serious journals who don't spin results.
     
    #36
  37. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    Eric, I will take a look. Thanks for the suggestion.
     
    #37
  38. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    O3 intake in general makes sense to me, because clearly most of our grain-based meat diet just doesn't offer it. Unless you take in some kind of O3, be it fish or a seed oil, you just can't get a decent O3:O6 ratio that matches what our ancestors had. That can't be good.

    Usually fish oil comes in 3 different grades. The regular stuff, molecular distilled, and pharmaceutical grade. The latter two is desirable because, then, you know you have none of the vitamin A, mercury and other pollutants in the stuff. And you can be reasonably sure the stuff hasn't oxidized yet. The cost increase from regular to molecular distilled isn't that high. From molecular distilled to pharma grade, there you see the jump.

    You can pretty much tell the difference between the molecular distilled and pharma grade by the EPA/DHA levels per gram. Regardless of what brand or company you buy, the quantities work about the same. I've found that I can't even take the molecular distilled without significant gastric distress.

    I've read some of McDougall's and Ornish's books from the early 90s. He promotes a VLF diet centered around on complex carbohydrates (80% or so.) As I recall, he advocates a vegetarian diet and is especially critical about the usage of dairy.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2007
    #38
  39. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    I COMPLETELY agree with this statement. (read: eat more fruits and veggies).
     
    #39
  40. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    I guess you consider The Lancet and The New England Journal of Medicine to be serious journals, right ?
     
    #40
  41. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Legend

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    Fish oil is good for you - but I prefer flax and sesamin (which is made from sesame oil). However I can't afford to blow money on any of it right now. The problem I have with fish oil...

    1) Fish burps.
    2) Lead

    Pete
     
    #41
  42. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    Sesame Oil is a good source of Omega-6.

    The problem with our modern diet is that it contains far more omega-6 than omega-3. The ratio in the typical American diet has been estimated to be as high as 20 to 1.

    Adding sesame oil will make the problem get worse. It's much better to add omega-3 and at the same time reduce the omega-6.
     
    #42
  43. GRANITECHIEF

    GRANITECHIEF Hall of Fame

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    ^^True, most people don't understand the difference between the 03 and 06 and think that flax provides plenty of 03, which is not the case.

    I'm a huge proponent of DHA / 03's and have a nice little chunk of MATK stock, which has been doing well lately. Martek Bio makes the DHA/03's from the same place that the fishies get it: Algae. Hence no potential for mercury, PCB or other contaminants.

    If you don't want to throw down the cash for Neuromins:

    http://www.iherb.com/ProductDetails.aspx?c=1&pid=1218&at=0

    Then this is a good one:

    http://www.iherb.com/ProductDetails.aspx?c=1&pid=5328&at=0

    Also, this one's on super special:

    http://www.iherb.com/ProductDetails.aspx?c=1&pid=7908&at=0

    Healthy hunting everyone!!
     
    #43
  44. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    Has there been any study done on the effect of enteric coating used for fish oil? It is designed to prevent fishy burps by not allowing the gel to dissolve until it reaches the lower intestines.

    My question is this: Different substances need different enzymes for optimum absorption into the body. If the coating keeps the oil from reacting with any enzymes secreted by organs above the lower intestines, can we get the most out of the fish oil?
     
    #44
  45. Dunlop300

    Dunlop300 New User

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    Fish Oil - WD40

    Subject: FW: Subject: WD40 - interesting uses

    Subject: WD40

    I had a neighbor who had bought a new pickup. I got up very early one Sunday
    morning and saw that someone had spray painted red all around the sides of
    this beige truck (for some unknown reason). I went over, woke him up and told
    him the bad news. He was very upset and was trying to figure out what to do
    probably nothing until Monday morning, since nothing was open. Another
    neighbor came out and told him to get his WD-40 and clean it off. It removed
    the unwanted paint beautifully and did not harm his paint job that was on the
    truck. I'm impressed! WD-40.... who knew?

    Water Displacement #40. The product began from a search for a rust
    preventative solvent and degreaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created
    in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its
    name comes from the project that was to find a "water displacement" compound.
    They were successful with the fortieth formulation, thus WD-40. The Corvair
    Company bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts.

    Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that
    would hurt you.

    When you read the "shower door" part, try it. It's the first thing that has
    ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it works just as
    well as glass. It's a miracle! Then try it on your stove top... Voila! It's
    now shinier than it's ever been. You'll be amazed.

    Here are some of the uses:
    1) Protects silver from tarnishing.
    2) Removes road tar and grime from cars.
    3) Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
    4) Gives floors that 'just-waxed' sheen without making it slippery.
    5) Keeps flies off cows.
    6) Restores and cleans chalkboards.
    7) Removes lipstick stains.
    8) Loosens stubborn zippers.
    9) Untangles jewelry chains.
    10) Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
    11) Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
    12) Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing.
    13) Removes tomato stains from clothing.
    14) Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
    15) Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.
    16) Keeps scissors working smoothly.
    17) Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes
    18) It removes black scuff marks from the kitchen floor! Use WD-40 for those
    nasty tar and scuff marks on flooring. It doesn't seem to harm the finish and
    you won't have to scrub nearly as hard to get them off. Just remember to open
    some windows if you have a lot of marks.
    19) Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car if not removed quickly! Use
    WD-40!
    20) Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
    21) Lubricates gear shift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding
    mowers.
    22) Rids kids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises.
    23) Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
    24) Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
    25) Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as
    vinyl bumpers.
    26) Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
    27) Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
    28) Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy
    handling.
    29) Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly
    30) Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.
    31) Removes splattered grease on stove.
    32) Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
    33) Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
    34) Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).
    35) Removes all traces of duct tape.
    36) Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain.
    37) Florida's favorite use is: "cleans and removes love bugs from grills and
    bumpers."
    38) The favorite use in the state of New York WD-40 protects the Statue of
    Liberty from the elements.
    39) WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will be
    catching the big one in no time. Also, it's a lot cheaper than the chemical
    attractants that are made for just that purpose. Keep in mind though, using
    some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.
    40) Use it for fire ant bites . It takes the sting away immediately and stops
    the itch.
    41) WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray on the mark and wipe
    with a clean rag.
    42) Also, if you've discovered that your teenage daughter has washed and dried
    a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with
    WD-40 and re-wash. Presto! Lipstick is gone!
    43) If you sprayed WD-40 on the distributor cap, it would displace the
    moisture and allow the car to start.

    P.S. AND GUESS WHAT!
    The basic ingredient OF WD-40 is FISH OIL!.
     
    #45
  46. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Dunlop300:

    That is brilliant! But, you may have too much time on your hands, like me, who read it all!
    :)

    -Robert
     
    #46
  47. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    Sorry, flax seed oil is a very good source of Omega-3 (Alpha Linolenic Acid).

    There are 3 types of Omega-3 family: Alpha Linolenic Acid (LNA), Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA).

    Your body converts LNA into EPA, and then converts EPA into DHA.

    When LNA interact with certain enzymes, it go through 2 transformations : it becomes desaturated by losing hydrogen and increasing the number of double bonds, and it become longer.

    The LNA conversion rate into LNA and DHA is about 10 %.

    LNA : 18 carbon atoms, 3 double bonds
    EPA : 20 carbon atoms, 5 double bonds
    DHA : 22 carbon atoms, 6 double bonds
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2007
    #47
  48. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    And in fact, I've heard it's more like between 5-10% Also not sure what happens if you actually metabolize the fats as energy when you ingest it.
     
    #48
  49. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    Yup, you're right.

    The LNA conversion into EPA is about 5-10 %, and about 2-5 % into DHA.

    Lifestyle factors can also negatively influence these conversions. There is also evidence to suggest that females are more efficient at converting linolenic acid than men; this is likely due to increased demands for EPA and DHA during pregnancy and lactation.

    References :

    1. Davis BC, Kris-Etherton PM. Achieving optimal essential fatty acid status in vegetarians: current knowledge and practical implications. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):640S-646S.

    2. Burdge GC, Wootton SA. Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids in young women. Br J Nutr. 2002 Oct;88(4):411-20.
     
    #49
  50. GRANITECHIEF

    GRANITECHIEF Hall of Fame

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    If DHA is your target, which it should be as it is the EFA that does most of the heavy lifting in terms of health benefits, then does a 2-5% conversion rate provide "plenty"? How many bowls of flax seed cereal or other flax supplemented food would you need to get 400mg of DHA?

    The answer is too many! The answer is skip the flax and go straight to the algae derived DHA.
     
    #50

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