Floaty Groundstroked Balls

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by user92626, Mar 31, 2008.

  1. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Hi All,

    I have a quick question. What causes the FH groundstroked ball to be floaty (but it does land around the baseline)?

    a few things I tried to remedy this are:

    hit more at the middle of the ball instead of below it, and close the racquet face to the ground a tiny bit which I do not think is the right thing to do, and lower the follow-thru position. None of this gave me satisfaction.

    What do I miss? Thnx

    ps. I used sw grip
     
    #1
  2. FH2FH

    FH2FH Professional

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    What you tried should have worked. Do you live on the moon? ;)

    Unless someone is coming in and putting away your balls at the net, it doesn't matter. If you still want the ball to have less arc, swing so the racquet has less arc; flatter, horizontal, etc.
     
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  3. Taxvictim

    Taxvictim Semi-Pro

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    Just a guess, but you're putting backspin on the ball, which makes it float longer. Try a higher follow-through position or other techniques for a topspin FH.
     
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  4. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Yeah, it certainly sounds like he's getting backspin, yet he says he uses a SW grip. For most people that grip would automatically force them swing from low to high, at least that's what happened to me. :confused:
     
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  5. FH2FH

    FH2FH Professional

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    Could also be leaning back. Shoulders should be fairly level and weight should be moving into the ball, not backward.
     
    #5
  6. junbumkim

    junbumkim Professional

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    If it's floating, you are probably not making a firm contact with the ball and accelerating through the contact zone.

    When my forehand go haywire, one thing I focus on is to hit the right lower side of the ball for my forehand.
     
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  7. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    I don't understand the "backspin" effect mentioned here :)

    FH2FH might have a point about me leaning back too much. I've been been commented by fellow players that I didn't stoop down enough. I will try to lean forward more.

    See, I'm conscious about hitting the ball with the racquet face perpendicular to the ground. Perhaps somewhere in there I am also unconsciously doing some "lifting" of the ball for fear of netting it.

    I can't believe I'm still engineering the FH for myself which is the most common stroke. :)
     
    #7
  8. Taxvictim

    Taxvictim Semi-Pro

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    Now I'm confused. Your little smiley indicates this is a joke statement, yet you don't really seem to understand. So, just to be safe: topspin makes the ball curve down into the court, and backspin (underspin) causes the ball to stay aloft longer, though it has much less forward pace once it bounces. If you are holding your racket face perpendicular to the court, and you have lowered your follow-through, that suggests the racket face is brushing DOWN on the back of the ball during contact, creating backspin. That's great for a slice shot, but not good if you're trying for a fast non-floaty groundstroke.
     
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  9. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    thanks taxvictim

    man, your alias sounds .. painful. :)
     
    #9
  10. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    My guess is that you are in the air when you hit. Try setting your feet and stay on the ground.

    If you are trying the "sit and lift" and time your "lift" correctly, then you can be in the air and still get a solid shot off.

    But if you are in the habit of jumping without proper timing, then your shot will just float.
     
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  11. Essential Tennis

    Essential Tennis Rookie

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    I'm glad to see more than one person told you to close your racket face....if the ball is floating, your strings are facing upwards, period. It doesn't matter if you "think" they're perpandicular, the physics don't change, and the ball doesn't lie. You need to close your face more.

    If you close your face and the ball hits the net, or falls short in the court, you have to swing upwards and forwards faster and longer, keeping your face closed.

    These things were all said above but I just wanted to affirm them since many other suggestions were made:

    hitting the bottom of the ball, hitting the ball "firmer", keeping your feet on the ground, and leaning forewards more will all do nothing to fix your problem (hitting the bottom of the ball will MAKE the ball float, heh). Three of those were great tips, but any floating ball is the result of an open face.
     
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  12. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    scot, I don't think I understand or apply the sit and lift (if that's what you mean doing with the body). I, however, apply the weight shifting, from back leg to front leg. I do not jump. My feet are firmly planted.

    "You need to close your face more."
    Essential, do you close the racquet face via the grip or the forearm pronation? I suppose it's that latter since there's only one comfortable grip for anyone.

    By the way, do you guys also "aim" the ball since no one is mentioning this? Is it worthwhile to aim to ball lower? :confused:
     
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  13. Essential Tennis

    Essential Tennis Rookie

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    Don't worry about the sit and lift stuff until you get this straightened out. If you lift better but change nothing else, the ball will only float more. After all that is the issue it sounds like, the ball is going "up" too much, as opposed to forwards.

    Good question on the racket face. If you truly do have a semi western grip, then I wouldn't suggest turning it even farther to close the face, with that grip your face should be very closed already. If you hold your racket in your hand with a semi western grip, and relaxedly put your arm/hand down by your side the forehand side of the racket should be pointing down at the ground. If you then take the racket and bring it up wast high, still keeping everything relaxed, your racket face should be still a little bit closed, perpendicular at the most in terms of being open. This is the position your racket should be in when making contact with the ball, if during your normal swing the ball floats, then at contact you're physically turning your hand/forearm upwards to open the face, and you need to learn to just let your hand and arm relax and lift up without doing this.

    Using a top spin ground stroke swing (upward swing), you should be aiming about three feet over the top of the net on your average rally ball. You can "aim" all you want, if the face doesn't get closed up you will continue to hit a weak shot.

    Making any sense?
     
    #13

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