Foot Lactic Acid During Play?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Moz, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    I'm doing a fair bit of gym and work and playing a lot of tennis so I'm not getting tired muscles when I am playing - with the exception of my right foot (I'm right handed).

    I've been working a lot on my footwork and trying to get my feet working more and also against the ball machine. I'm finding that my right foot seems to be getting a lot of lactic acid as if I am gripping the sole of my shoe with it. This is especially apparent if I drill open stance forehands for a long time against the ball machine.

    At least, it feels like lactic acid - I can't really be sure. It also hurts the next day when i get up - although whether it's the effects of the tennis or mostly plantar fasciitis I'm not exactly sure.

    Does anyone else experience this? What is the correct thing to be doing with your feet when actually hitting the ball? Anyway to avoid this?
     
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  2. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Where is the pain? When you get up do you have pain putting your foot down?

    It sounds like its POSSIBLY some plantar fasciitis, a dreaded problem, which means you will need a witch doctor to get rid of it. Call Voldemort! :)

    I wish I were completely kidding. PF is one of those niggly little injuries that just throws your game off enough to drive you Nucking FUTS.

    Good luck.

    -Robert
     
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  3. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    Hi Robert

    I have had plantar in the past when I was a runner and I completely agree with you! There is a bit of that now but that doesn't account for all of the morning pain and it isn't affecting my tennis.

    The thing that is bothering me the most is the fact my foot starts to get so tired during play. Weird. Do you grip your sole with your foot and toes when you plant for a shot?
     
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  4. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Yes, I do, but I'm sure at my age my feet are nowhere near as active as yours.

    This may be your SHOES. I would try a different pair of shoes.

    Also, it may just be a transitory problem from overtraining.

    Stretch good after your workout, then ice down the foot. Later, maybe a hot bath.

    I'm sure you will be fine in a few days.

    I hope it isn't PF.

    -Robert
     
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  5. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    I'm glad you do it as well.

    I've just got a new pair for clay court play and they fit alot snugger - I'll see if they help.

    I'll try the stretching and icing also. Thanks for the suggestions.

    I suspect my foot will get used to it eventually.
     
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  6. Julieta

    Julieta Guest

    I’m having problems with my right foot as well. I returned to competitive play after a long time off (I still hit but I didn’t play tournaments or anything). Like you, I’m taking some time off from work and I’ve been training and playing a lot more over the past few months. I also have an open stance forehand. I do put excessive load on my right side, which is something in my technique that I need to correct.

    I’ve had an MRI and the diagnosis was sesamoiditis. The doctor said there is really nothing he can do for me; all I can do is ice, rest, wear supportive shoes (no high heels which should not be a problem for you). During tournaments I do take anti-inflams, which seem to help. I also have orthotics but my experiences with them have been mixed at best.

    My massage therapist thinks my hip is causing the problem (related to the open stance). An athletic trainer also told me that he thinks its plantar only in my case it is not in the heel but the other part of the plantar. I have no idea at this point and I can’t always predict when it is going to hurt. I do try to ice and stretch but sometimes I just get tired of doing it (especially during the times it doesn’t hurt).

    I hope you can get your problem under control. If I find any magical solutions I will post them!
     
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  7. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    Thanks Julieta - sorry you're having problems as well.

    I tried some alternative therapy today and can report that getting your toes sucked by a prostitute didn't work either. (okay, I'm joking).

    I'm going to try stretching it before playing after I have warmed up.
     
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