Forearm Rotation on the 1 Hander (B. Bill and others)

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Puma, Jun 17, 2004.

  1. Puma

    Puma Rookie

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    B. Bill,

    On the last thread about the forearm rotation, I think we are saying the same thing. The difference (I think) is you have more skill, timing, strenght and experience than me.

    For me, with all things perfect, weight shift etc, if I attempt to accellerate the rotation I will indeed impart a great deal more racket speed. However, in my case, I don't have the timing yet to achieve a very high percentage of good shots doing this. Most balls will go too low.

    I would like to add though, that I have been able(lots of practice) to create enough pace without forcing the issue with the forearm rotation. At first when I realized there were two ways to approach it, the low to high method was much weaker but much more consistant. As I imporve the gap is closing on pace, but the gap in consitency is not. But, this just may be me..........

    Puma
     
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  2. Exci

    Exci Rookie

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    No flame intended, but we might want to keep this in the other thread, because this way we might debate the same thing over and over again at the same time in different threads. :)

    Anyway, If you've read my post in the other thread, you know that I feel the same about it as well. While the forearm rotation should impart more spin, it doesn't add the safe clearence for me, but the balls get of that racquet so good if the situation allows me to..
     
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  3. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I actually agreed with you on the last post on this subject. Maybe it is me, but I am fairly strong and I am 6' 2". I come from the tennis thinking that "less is more".

    However, I do see what you're saying and see a lot of players using the forearm rotation as an element in their swing. I am not against it nor would I ever not encourage it or teach it. I jsut think it is veyr hard to time on a consistent basis. Very few talented people (which you may be one of them) can do that over and over again. I guess I am not that talented to incorporate that in my onehanded backhand.

    Speaking for myself, when I transfer my weight on that front foot and contact the ball cleanly (low to high etc.), I get more then enough pace and topspin. It's a combination of a flat ball with topspin that shoots when it hits the ground. If I wanted more topspin (higher bounce) then I would swing steeper and plpace more of the speed of the swing going up rather then out.

    For me the onehander is a touchy stroke. Only for a few it is natural. For me, the onehander is not so natural where I feel comfortable "trying" things out. Heck, it takes me a couple of games just to get the rythym down where my forehand starts off firing right away!
     
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  4. Montana Realty

    Montana Realty New User

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    I'm not following you guys. What do you mean by "rotating the forearm?" I would like to learn more about this technique. Can you give me an example?
     
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  5. TwistServe

    TwistServe Guest

    I beleive this is just pronation of the forearm to give added topspin (clockwise rotation). Some coaches tell me to do it more, and some say let the swing path (low to high) achieve the topspin.
     
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  6. Puma

    Puma Rookie

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    It may be difficult to put into words, or it may be difficult for me. However I will give it a try.

    Assuming the proper mechanics are used such as foot work, weight shift, anchoring weight onto leading foot etc, often with the one hander the forearm leads the racket/hand into impact. After impact it can be seen that the tip of the racket will be pointing upward toward the sky when the arm is generally pointing towards the net. With and eastern grip I think the palm would be pointing towards the left corner of the court, or somewhat close to that.

    The backhand can be done in such a way where there is more forearm rotation incorporated in the stroke. In such a stroke the action of the racket face closing is accellerated a bunch. At the same point in the finish of the stroke as described above the hitting side of the racket would be pointing down toward the court due to the speed of the release of the racket, or the palm of the hand would be pointing skyward.

    I have seen a couple of beginners try to impart spin by rolling the racket face closed during the stroke. This is NOT the same thing. A good powerfull rotation of the forearm is the RESULT or all the torque created by the mechanic listed in the beginning. I call this a release. This is very, very similar to the release of a golf club in a golf swing.

    As B. Bill was saying, this is an advanced technique and is very difficult to control. Its not that hard to do, but it is hard to control. Timing is way critical.

    For me, I can do it, but I have no idea where it might go. When it goes over the net it is usually long. As my backhand has improved I have noticed that I rarely ever attempt to do this. I just not that good.

    Interestingly, I learned this for the person who first began to teach me tennis. He has a marvelous one hander.

    I hope this helps......

    Puma
     
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  7. C_Urala

    C_Urala Semi-Pro

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    please, keep it in one thread!
     
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