Forehand balls going to the left too much and pain

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by sandiegoman, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. sandiegoman

    sandiegoman Rookie

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    I'm a right handed player. Lately my forehand balls are going way too far left - it's hard to hit the ball straight in the middle. Also when I play, my wrist and inner forearm has been feeling a little sore.

    I play with an Aeropro Cortex with Luxilon M2 strings.

    Any suggestions to my technique or should I change raquets?
     
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  2. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    Have someone look at your technique first. As for the racquet, do you have any history of arm pain?
     
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  3. psv255

    psv255 Professional

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    Those two things -- leftward balls and forearm/wrist pain -- lead me to believe that you're actively using your wrist to hit your forehand! Try to relax your arm and use it as passively as you possibly can; imagine timing your shot with your shoulders or hips rather than your hand/arm, if that makes any sense.

    As for racquet and strings: what tension is the M2 strung at? If anything above 57, I'd suggest bringing the tension down or hybrid with a more arm-friendly string.
     
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  4. moopie

    moopie Rookie

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    Are you using your wrist and forearm to swing the racket around as you hit the ball? If you are that's the wrong technique. Your wrist needs to be laid back and passive. The racket comes around through it's own momentum. Active use of your wrist will lead to injury.

    Fist thing I would do is rest your wrist. A wrist injury is very hard to get over.

    As for the ball going too far to the left, that's likely also a technique issue. Try the "hit 3 balls" method. Imagine two more balls in front of the actual ball, in a line towards your target. Your goal is to hit all three balls with your swing. Remember, laid back passive wrist.
     
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  5. sandiegoman

    sandiegoman Rookie

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    Yes, I have been using my writs and forearm to swing the racquet. Any ways to practice this at home?

    Thanks for all of the advice so far - I appreciate it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
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  6. Mick3391

    Mick3391 Professional

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    Either strengthen your arm, stop playing, or practice, it's NOT THE RACQUETS, WHERE DO THESE SISSEYS GUYS COME FROM????
     
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  7. v-verb

    v-verb Hall of Fame

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    Harsh:-|:shock:
     
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  8. v-verb

    v-verb Hall of Fame

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    Good advice. I had a wrist injury last summer. Ditched my extra long racquets and went old school with POGS, took some lessons and discovered I was muscling my shots instead of laying the wrist back and using hip/body rotation.

    Now I can hit a lot harder with much less effort. The wrist is still sore but healing and I'm using KT bandages which help me quite a bit.

    Good luck. And IMO I've hit with the AeroPro and found it harsh. I did try a Pure Drive, loved it and bought it but was still hard on the wrist - no limp wrist jokes please:evil:

    For me old school racquets work best. But you need to find what is best for you
     
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  9. Mick3391

    Mick3391 Professional

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    The truth often times is:)
     
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  10. psv255

    psv255 Professional

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    Mick,
    1. strengthening his arm would still put stress on the wrist/forearm
    2. practicing incorrect technique would lead to more injury

    That leaves either stop playing or play and get injured.
    I don't see a workable solution in your post, unlike some others'...

    I respect your opinions but keeping an open mind never hurt!
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
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  11. Mick3391

    Mick3391 Professional

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    I know man, it's just that I played since I was 12 with no injuries, and I used a what 14 oz monster? I will admit this yea I've been nothing but injuries, drugs so I can walk, braces, etc.

    I just, and I guess it's just me and perhaps you are right, but I just play through it, it just seems so many get hurt and want to BLAME SOMETHING, I mean if you are playing tennis you can get hurt.

    Sorry if I seem Neaderthal, but if you have injuries a racquet won't make a difference, just quit or get it fixed, my brother who taught me, 10 years older than me, has had two knees replaced, I was shocked at the last one, cell phone message "Yea I have a new Titanium knee, I'll whip you now", I mean we are men, if we don't want injuries like Lions in the wild we won't enggage, we engage and yea problems happen, but my point is these FAIRY PUNKS WHO ACT LIKE THEY ARE VICTIMS.

    Have they never read that tennis may be harmful? Just no personal accountability in today's society, it must be the manufacturers fault
     
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  12. sandiegoman

    sandiegoman Rookie

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    So, using my shoulders an hips for most of the energy and not using the forearm?
     
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  13. psv255

    psv255 Professional

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    It's definitely a less injury-prone way to go!

    Check out Lock and Roll here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wwg9DB8S8a8
     
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  14. psv255

    psv255 Professional

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    No I get you, some will blame it on the racquet rather than their own faults in technique/whatever; racquets have more to do with preferring the feel of one over another, and pain never really has to do with what type of racquet you pick...

    Thankfully OP's problem is very fixable :)
     
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  15. Mick3391

    Mick3391 Professional

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    Yea, but more than that, I mean in everything we do, and forgive my philosophy, but NO ONE IS HOLDING A GUN TO OUR HEAD, we don't have to run, or workout, or play tennis, if we are rational beings, we must know we can be injured doing certain things, but so many act like victims, "OH, I must sue for money the racquet manufactuer, I'm a innocent moron who never knew I could be hurt by running, running, yea I'll sue the shoe company also".

    We had a dude on this forum one time for that exact reason. I told people, "When the price of your racuet doubles, and balls, blame this F...K", He'll be sitting at home with Millions and when you buy your son a racquet don't be surprised if it doesn't say "Not for those under 18", or "You must register for this racquet as it's know to be dangerous"!

    Where are the ACCOUNTABLE MEN? I have hurt MYSELF all year long, in the hospital, two braces, oxycondone, can't walk down the stairs, who do I blame? ME!

    We are a victim society and I rarely meet MEN, or WOMEN for that matter, if YOUR TENNIS RACQUET GIVES YOU PROBLEMS DON'T BLAME THE MANUFACTURER AND F...K IT UP FOR US, JUST QUIT!
     
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  16. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    Mick,

    Your "philosophy" may make you feel more "manly" but only if you're twelve years old and have zero business experience or connections with the real world. It's pure fantasy since it assume that product designers and corporate managers are 100% flawless. It assumes they make perfect products incapable of causing injury when used as intended whether through unintentionally poor design or deliberate cutting of corners. It's really quite immature.

    I have a degree in industrial design (Notre Dame, full ride scholarship) and have spent my career in technology development. I can assure you that product designers, product managers, and senior executives are not infallible or incorruptible. I know this from personal experience having served as all three. They're human, they screw up, and/or they cut corners. The result is products that are as imperfect as their builders.

    In short, you're asserting that the tennis industry is staffed by demi-gods incapable of making mistakes or cutting corners. Save the right wing fantasy chest pounding for dorky talk radio shows geared towards fearful old men easily confused by propoganda.

    That being said, in the op's case it might be the racquet but based on his description it sounds more like technique. Too wristy which is very common problem.

    SANDIEGOMAN: another thing that might work is to try NOT moving your head on groundstrokes. Focus on rotating your shoulders around the axis formed by your head and neck. You'll need to improve your anticipation skills to move to the ball early and prepare properly to achieve a stable hitting platform. But by rotating around your head and neck you'll almost force yourself to use your core and shoulders more.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
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  17. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    I think you should take a week off of tennis and rest your arm and get plenty of sleep. Maybe do some physio as well. If you don't rest the pain will get worse and you could hurt yourself and end up with a recurring problem.

    After that week of rest, get someone to look at your technique. As for the equipment, have you always played with this set up or is this new? Also, are you over 30? Joints start to deteriorate after that age. Take care of your body.
     
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