Forehand "falling backwards"

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by ZhangM58, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. ZhangM58

    ZhangM58 Rookie

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    Hey all, got a quick question. I tend to "fall backwards" when I hit my forehand to generate spin with a semi-western grip. I know this is wrong, but if I don't do this, my shots tend to land short, and it dosn't have a lot of spin on it neither. Anyone have any suggestions that will help me correct this? -Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Put your weight on the back leg and drive your forehand.
     
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  3. BillH

    BillH Rookie

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    I have the same problem. However, leaning back on the forehand generally is responsible for making my shots go into the net. I try to counteract my tendency to lean back by using a closed stance and stepping into the ball. Its hard to step into the ball and lean back at the same time. The difference in the depth and weight of my shots is dramatic when I don't lean back. I use a strong eastern grip on forehands.
     
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  4. Rapmaster

    Rapmaster New User

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    Try to take the ball further in front of you to counteract this. Focus less on the spin and try to place your weight forward, while leaning on your back foot.

    I used to have a similar problem and this is how I resolved it, sort of.
     
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  5. ZhangM58

    ZhangM58 Rookie

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    I see, thanks for the help!
     
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  6. ZhangM58

    ZhangM58 Rookie

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    Also so another, do any of you recommand me moving it completely to the 4th side and focus on mainly driving through the ball? Or should I stick with what I have, because it is very close, it's pertty much on the 4th side.
     
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  7. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    The V of your hand should be on the next bevel over from where the V is on the bevel for an eastern forehand grip.
     
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  8. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    To extend on this advice... put your weight on the back leg and transfer it to the front leg during the stroke.

    With a pretty extreme grip such as the "almost western" you seem to be describing, it is hard to get a penetrating, deep shot without good weight transfer. Of course, you can muscle or "arm" it (leaning back and letting it rip), but this is probably not good for your body. A simple tip to get you on your way to moving your weight in towards the ball is to keep your center of gravity low. Bend those knees when you see the ball coming, load up on the back leg, and transfer forwards. This applies even for an extreme grip like yours (which generally results in an extreme stance... i.e. open stance). You still load up on the "back" (i.e. right if you're a righty) leg and transfer your weight into the ball. If you had to think of one thing during your stroke, my advice would to be thinking "get low." It's a hard habit to kick, but i think once you master it otherwise you will have a ton of confidence in your stroke. Good luck!
     
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  9. ZhangM58

    ZhangM58 Rookie

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    Thanks for the advice, I think you misread a little. I do use the semi-western, but its its kinda between 3rd and 4th side, maybe a little toward a "full" semi-western.
     
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  10. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    I was taught the 'continental' bevel was the "first" bevel, which is why i was confused... pardon me ;D
     
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  11. cervelo

    cervelo Rookie

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    Zhang:

    If falling backwards, do you 1) drive with the back leg (for righties, the right leg) and land on that same leg? OR 2) drive with the back leg and land on the front leg, even though perhaps "drifting" backwards? OR 3) fall backwards with both feet on the ground?

    FYI: #1 can work, but if your balls are consistently short, you're not getting your weight into the shot and will need to change it.

    #2 does work- I've found it to be employed by upper intermediates to advanced level players- Importantly, the torsion and leg drive is still very much a part of this style of forehand- this forehand still has weight behind it, usually with a full western and big time racquet head speed ... but the player "drifts" backward while leaning forward- when they "land," they're over their toes.

    #3 - with both feet on the court and weight moving away from the target, there's no way to get consistent depth and your arm will hate you for it.

    Get a video of your shot and see what's happening.
     
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  12. donnyz89

    donnyz89 Hall of Fame

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    i do this too, but if u use your body and shoulder rotation more u wont be falling back as much, u are using too much arm, and its inconsistant. and your weight is on your right foot (if u are right handed). for me, i get airborn a little bit on my forehands, but i still fall back at times which i do realize and is correcting it.
     
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  13. SageOfDeath

    SageOfDeath Guest

    I agree if you are propery shifting your weight into the ball then your balls won't land short. Since you are using semi-full western ,much like myself, then you should stand open stance. At all times keep your knees bent. People don't bend their knees as much as they should and its rare to see someone with too much knee bend so keep telling yourself to bend your knees. Keeping your knees BENT, when you prepare for the ball for a forehand keep your non-dominant hand on the throat of the racquet. When you reach 3 o' clock then you let go of the throat of your racquet but keep your arm at 3 o' clock. Now stop and make sure that your sholders and chest are NOT facing the net. They should be facing 3 o' clock. Countinue with your backswing of your forehand till you reach 6 o' clock. Keep your racquet head up and parallel to the fence. When you start to swing make sure that your racquet get under the ball with the handle leading the head of your racquet to your shot. As you move you racquet your shoulders and chest should start turning towards the net and you should start tucking your elbow close to your body. Keep knees bent!!!! When you contact the ball the handle and racquet head should be square. Also when you contact the ball, you should hit IN FRONT OF YOUR BODY asuming you are leaning more towards western. ONLY brush up after you have hit the ball, IN FRONT OF YOUR BODY. complete your swing AFTER you hit the ball and when your almost ready to follow through don't put the racquet over your shoulder but to your side so your elbow should be facing up. This is a wind-shield wiper which is actually optional but I find it pretty useful to help me remember to follow through. DON"T do the wind-shield wiper when you are hitting the ball only do it AFTER you hit the ball.

    That is my version of a semi-full western and its sort of generic. You can find your own follow through and preperation after you become more advanced but your shoulders & chest should be at 3'o clock when preparing and you should have your nondominant hand on the throat of your racquet.
     
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  14. SageOfDeath

    SageOfDeath Guest

    Hope this helps
     
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  15. donnyz89

    donnyz89 Hall of Fame

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    a key to avoid falling back is shoulder rotation, your right shoulder should be completely turned facing your opponent, because falling back also means your weight is on your back foot so your shoulder is not rotated, its likely facing your right side instead of in front of you.
     
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