Forehand Stance

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by XRanger, Sep 7, 2004.

  1. XRanger

    XRanger New User

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    Can someone explain to me the difference between open and closed stance and what's the pros and cons of each. and which one do you use?
     
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  2. XRanger

    XRanger New User

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  3. MChong

    MChong Semi-Pro

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    Well, an open stance is basically what it says; open houses are basically having your feet and body pointing towards the net. A closed stance is just turned to your right, assuming you're a righty, on the forehand. In a closed stance one foot is in front of the other, pretty much... Does that make any sense?

    Well, the advantages to an open stance is that it takes less time, while a closed stance requires an extra step, but I'm not very well versed in any other pros and cons
     
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  4. Chanchai

    Chanchai Semi-Pro

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    Stating what's already been said, but in a different language.

    Imagine a line that connects one foot to the other. And mainly focus on Open, semi-open, and Neutral here.

    Open stance would be if that line was parallel to the baseline, and you are facing forward.

    Neutral/Forward stance is if that line were to be perpindicular.

    Semi-Open is almost anything in between the Open and Neutral.

    Closed stance is almost any stance where your front foot crosses over your back foot (like your right foot being on your left side for a backhand or your left food being on your right side for a forehand).

    NOTE. The stance applies to your feet position (and in effect, affects the mechanics of your strokes overall). What's important to note is that your upper body (indicated by your shoulders) is a seperate matter from the stance.

    My personal ideal is to have my shoulders perpindicular to the net when preparing a groundstroke (backswing), regardless of the stance I'm in. Hope I'm not confusing you too much--but the message is that the stance doesn't imply your entire body, just the position of the feet in relation to where you are facing.

    -Chanchai
     
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