forehand takeback question!

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by dherring, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. dherring

    dherring New User

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    hello all, I have a question about my sw grip forehand. I just cant find a fh takeback that feels natural to me, can anyone instruct me as to how to execute a simple, effective, forehand takeback that gives the most power, comments are appreciated
     
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  2. roddick89

    roddick89 Rookie

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    Use your hips, that where i get alot of power from, and good racquet head speed although thats more the actual swing.
    Good Luck
     
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  3. FH2FH

    FH2FH Professional

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    A long [correct] swing will give you a lot of power, but increase the chances of mistiming the ball. Watch pro players and try to do something like one of them. Agassi is a good example.
     
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  4. anchorage

    anchorage Rookie

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    Start taking the racket back using just the shoulder turn. In order to ensure a really good shoulder turn, keep both hands on the racket - this helps you to get fully side on. At this point, your racket is about opposite your back shoulder, pointing upwards hands about shoulder height or slightly higher (still both hands on the racket). You're now in a good position to prepare the actual stroke. Release, the left hand (for right hander), let it point at the ball and take the racket further back (as far back as you're comfortable with). You're all set.
     
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  5. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Roddick's takeback will offer the most powerful forehand that can be done. Roddick pushes the racquet back with his left hand which incorporates a big unit turn. The unit turn helps a lot in the power department as you can see in this slow motion clip of Roddick's forehand.

    Roddick's forehand
     
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  6. mark rodgers

    mark rodgers Rookie

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    From the "Ready" position, release the racquet with your non hitting hand, lift up both elbows to be at about a 90 degree angle from your side as you coil your mid section to the "load" position. The non hitting hand should go with the flow of your core so that you get a shoulder turn as well. Keep the racquet head up.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2008
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  7. dherring

    dherring New User

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    its funny that you said that rickson, I actually use a similar takeback now. The problem is that I have to many "off days" with my forehand, so I'm looking for a simpler takeback that provides equal power.
     
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  8. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    If you're asking if it's possible to hit a forehand with no unit turn, the answer is yes, but if you're wondering if it would be a powerful forehand, I'd have to say no because you'd be arming the shot.
     
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  9. Rafael_Nadal_6257

    Rafael_Nadal_6257 Semi-Pro

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    Good tip Rickson, about the unit turn and Roddick's forehand takeback.

    As I understand it, a longer takeback equals a bigger unit turn providing more momentum, which leads to more force exerted on the tennis ball, which provides for increased pace and circular motion or spin (I'm currently doing my AP Physics homework, so my mind is stuck in physics mode :p).

    On the other hand, at the same time, a longer takeback is directly proportional to the number of chances you will have to make a mistake - shanks, timing error, inconsistency...and the list goes on.

    So your best bet is to find the balance between the two that works the best for you and your game. Your forehand takeback style will depend greatly on what your game is dependent on. If you are offensively-minded in tennis like Roddick, and employ a relatively big forehand with spin, then a longer takeback would be most likely suited to you. If however, you play a counterpunching or defensive game, you will want to shorten the takeback, and implement a smaller unit turn.
     
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