Forgot how to win

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by Playtennis, Nov 16, 2013.

  1. Playtennis

    Playtennis New User

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    Okay you league goers..... Anyone ever experience tho? It's like you forget how to win. You are making so many UE- have dips in your game- and are losing so much you forget how to win? Advice?
     
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  2. jussumman

    jussumman Semi-Pro

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    You need to center yourself. At least that's what has worked for me (once). Breath deep and focus on the seat of consciousness, the point of concentration in between the eyes. I'm not explaining it right, but the feeling of getting "centered" has helped me play better in tight points/matches.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2013
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  3. rdis10093

    rdis10093 Hall of Fame

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    then that is unfortunate
     
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  4. aced_Tezuka

    aced_Tezuka Rookie

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    As cliche as it sounds. Keep your eyes on the ball. Harder to make an error if you know if you're contacting the ball.

    And conditioning can be good too if you don't make it to the ball in time and end up making an error.
     
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  5. Nostradamus

    Nostradamus G.O.A.T.

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    Ohhhhhhhhhhh,,LOL. I thought I read Federer forgot how to win......LOL
     
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  6. Nostradamus

    Nostradamus G.O.A.T.

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    Easy. Play with Controlled Aggression. play aggressive and stop the silly errors. make the guy beat you by coming in to the net and getting 1st serves in. Guy rips clean winners by you every time, that is ok. make him prove he can do that.
     
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  7. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    It can be a tough situation. When you make a lot of UE you tend to try to play harder and hit harder trying for lower percentage shots. When I am in a rut, I try to back off my game a little bit and concentrate on just hitting good groundstrokes and not trying to overthink shots. At my level, a lot of points come from UEs so if I can keep the ball in play and get some points off that, it benefits me. As the confidence comes back, I can ramp up my play a little. Sounds easier said than done but it works for me at 3.5. Another thing is, only allow yourself five seconds to think about an error. If you let them get to you over time, you will spin your wheels big time.
     
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  8. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    I have the opposite problem.

    I play so safe (hitting most of shots down the middle with high looping shots), I am getting pushed around. I feel like I am hitting at the 50% of my normal pace, even when I try to swing hard.
     
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  9. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I have the same problem as well, I don't have a solution. I'm a 3.0, and in the beginning of the year I was beating other 3.0s 1-1, 1-0, 2-1. Now I'm losing sets, and going to tie breakers vs. other 3.0s. Have even lost two 3.0 matches in the past two months, one of them beat me 1-1. Total reversal of fortune, in a way.

    I'm going to take lessons again with a new coach, see if there's anything that I'm doing glaringly wrong. I would suggest the same to the OP.
     
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  10. tennixpl

    tennixpl Rookie

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    Did i get another username and post unconsciously......?

    Fighting through same issue. Whacky matches that i lose even when i fight.
    I am a slow starter and that kills me. My issue is focus! staying in the current point, giving it my all and accepting that some points you will still lose. focus on the ball, don't worry about hitting a winner or UE worry about getting your feet into position and your racquet back, let the stroke and game take its course.


    bend your knees and move your feet,
    bend your knees and move your feet,
    bend your knees and move your feet,

    I chant this to myself and when i actually find myself doing it i find myself wining more points than losing......now doing every point is still an issue.
     
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  11. Sakkijarvi

    Sakkijarvi Semi-Pro

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    Yeah I agree with those suggesting that OP focus on the basics. I know some guys that have a hard time winning -- and one thing they have in common is worrying a lot about ... winning.
     
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  12. boosted180

    boosted180 New User

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    I have the exact same problem. I lost the last three matches I played, all in tie-breakers! They were all so close and in the end, I couldn't handle the pressure and basically gave away the matches. My confidence is so shaken now, that I'm hesitant to play even with guys who have poor records. It bothered me so much, I posted a thread about it: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=482883
     
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  13. boosted180

    boosted180 New User

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    Good advice. I'll try that. Sometimes I'm so tight, my feet just wont move and 80% of my UE are b/c of this. The last match I lost was from shanking an easy overhead b/c I was so nervous, I couldn't get my feet in position. The final score in the tie-breaker was 9-10! I felt the worst I'd ever felt since starting to play tennis (about 2.5 years).
     
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  14. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    That's what I do (watch the ball, the striations on it) and also keep the eyes on the contact ball. If I do that, not only my percentages are better on both sides, but I hit more relaxed, hence with more power etc.

    This is easier done then conditioning, although the second is even bigger.

    Of course focusing on breathing between points and other techniques help as well.
     
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  15. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    This is also a good variation even when you play well enough.
     
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  16. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    For controlled aggression one might also want to try hitting a few hard balls down the middle of the court. Coming into the net is usually a last resort tactic for me, when ground strokes totally fail (happened only once recently).
     
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  17. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    Come on man, get into your grove! Play relaxed, fluent shots and have confidence in them.
     
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  18. lostinamerica

    lostinamerica Semi-Pro

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    Forget what everyone has ever taught you. Read the Inner Game of Tennis by Tim Gallwey and incorporate it. When this inevitable spell happens again, read it again.

    I've been where you are and I looked at my bookshelf and there it was. I read it and began to reincorporate the mind set and the problems magically went away. I got away from the inner game and had problems. Now I make a point of reading it every year or so.

    It works.
     
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  19. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Maybe stop thinking about winning.

    Winning is only a symptom of playing well for more than just a minute or two. Use your most reliable tools as much as you can and put them to work for nothing more than the upcoming point. Play a solid point, then do it again. If you can focus more on this than the whole match (which we can only win or lose on a match point, btw), you may find it easier to be sharper more often.

    Not winning doesn't necessarily mean that you're doing things especially wrong either. You could be doing a number of things right against opponents who are simply more consistent. Even if you're not getting blown off the court, these "smooth criminals" can be sneaky good and make us wonder why we stink. Maybe we don't...

    Keep track of what you're trying to do right as you play. You might drop a point after a heroic rally or after controlling the action for most of an exchange, but we can sometimes forget all that when a small miss or a "too good" shot from the other end spoils the party. "Too good" is just too good, but when you go for it at the right time, recognize that and be your own best cheerleader. Whether you make it or miss it, focus on what you're trying to do right. A small miss is relatively easy to fix, but employing sound tactics is a small victory in itself.
     
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  20. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    Back to basics, brother (or sister).

    "Focus," I said to myself, dipping into my return of serve stance. "Focus, focus, focus."

    First serve. T. Lunge. Recover. Okay, it's in his FH court. Split. DTL incoming! Run. BH TS cross court, all thoughts and impulses that then ran through my head.

    The ball clips the tape. His point.

    "Okay, okay. Clear the net by more next time. Okay, deuce court return. Focus. Focus. Focus."
    What I'm attempting to illustrate is a basic mantra that can help focus you on the game. For me, I use the simple and self-evident mantra: focus. I force myself to say it over and over again while creating a single mind about the point that is about to start.

    Once the point starts, you really should not be thinking too much. You should be relying on your practice, your strategy, and your instinct.

    It's a marvelous thing, truly, when the match is over and you reflect on a focused performance. The whole world disappears--work, troubles, arguments, duties, goals--it all melts away when you're effectively focusing on achieving a single mind.

    Don't get flustered. Don't get negative. Don't get distracted. Don't look into the future. Don't live in the past. Focus on the point that is about to start, and that's it.
     
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  21. gopokes

    gopokes Rookie

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    My advice: Remember that tennis is a game that means nothing...absolutely nothing.

    I love the game, but when I let it, or golf, or anything become too prominent in my life, i usually play worse. You'll be far happier if you realize that there are folks who suffer in a real, authentic way in this world. Losing to people that are worse than you is not that big of a deal - yes, we all prefer to win, but you'll play far better, enjoy the game more, and probably get a few more in the 'W' column if you care less about the game overall - still love it, but let go of it a little and keep perspective on what really matters. Hope this doesn't sound preachy - not my intention, just my $.02 that may be worth far less than that! :)

    Also, hit it to the backhand as much as possible.
     
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  22. MauricioDias

    MauricioDias Rookie

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    some good advices in thie thread. I think the main idea is to concentrate, slow down your game and try only to keep the ball inside the court over the net =). After doing this sometime you will notice that you can improve your game again. This happens to almolst everyone, just stay calm and enjoy the game again.
     
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  23. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    I definitely agree. One thing I took away from reading Brad Gilbert's Winning Ugly is the approach where you become a boa constrictor and tighten up your game and play to keep the ball in play and let the unforced errors happen to your opponent. Play steady and keep the pressure steady.

    Just last night I was playing really well in doubles. I went from playing hard, to conservative and steady and back to all out Agassi style jumping forehands (ok, perception may not be reality). It was FUN. When you are on, tennis can be awesome.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2013
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  24. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    This is good advice. Normally if you focus on the little things, winning will just happen. Can't really force it, gotta focus on the journey before the destination.

    Here's a weird little thing going on with me right now. I bought new racquets. After doing so, I lost the first match I played with them and went on to win 10 or 11 in a row currently. I find myself so focused on the feel of the racquet that I am just hitting a really pure ball right now.
     
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  25. boosted180

    boosted180 New User

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    Very well said! After unnecessarily feeling horrible and beating myself up over 3 consecutive bad losses (choked in tie-breakers), I finally said to myself, "Enough is enough. If I'm gonna let tennis make me feel this bad, then I might as well not even play anymore." And reading Tim Gallwey's book also gave me a lot of perspective and all of a sudden playing became fun again and as a bonus, I won my next two league matches and one more match today non-league!

    But the main thing is that by not being afraid of losing, I was able to enjoy the game much more, play a lot better and most importantly avoid that horrible feeling of choking. I also lost one non-league match last week, but it didn't feel bad at all b/c I played my best and the guy was simply a better player than me. That I could live with. =)
     
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