Fully Funded Tennis Scholarship Programs vs Partially Funded

Discussion in 'College Tennis Talk' started by dbordel, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. dbordel

    dbordel New User

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    How can you tell if a program is fully funded? In other words how can you tell if they can support all 8 spots for a women's team?
     
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  2. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    You need to ask the coach or AD office.

    There is no chart or list that I am aware of.

    Safe to assume, I would say, that all the Majors are fully-funded. Prime candidates........not certainties just prime candidates........to be partially funded are mid-Major and below private schools

    EDIT: Even partially funded schools usually support 8 spots......just not with full scholys.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
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  3. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    All men's D1 and DII tennis programs are partially funded. Women's programs are fully funded, although a school can choose to partially fund it. The question I believe that is being asked here is how do you tell if a tennis program has all the scholarships available funded?
     
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  4. dbordel

    dbordel New User

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    Correct. Right now all I can do is look at rosters and see how many Freshman are in the lineup. Since my daughter is a freshman in HS, those spots would presumably free up when she graduates. For some schools, the roster does not list 8 spots for the teams I have been looking at - SOCON, Atlantic Sun, Big South. That makes me think that they are not fully funded or they really cannot fill up the team, which is hard to believe.
     
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  5. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    I would say it differently.

    I would say that men's programs are limited by NCAA rule to the equivalent of 4.5 scholarships that may be allocated to as many as 8? 10? players.....and that most D1 and D2 men's programs are fully funded up to what the NCAA allows.

    As stated previously, women's programs are limited by NCAA rule to 8 scholarships to no more than 8 women.....and several D1 and D2 programs are partially funded, particularly at the mid-malor private level and down.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2012
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  6. wings56

    wings56 Professional

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    believe it. many schools cant GIVE away all of their scholarships to women. the year after my alma mater's women's team won the southland conference, the coach had two scholarships he couldnt give away. he had only 6 girls on the team with two injuries and played much of the season with only 4 girls. you're lucky to have a daughter that could potentially play college tennis because she will almost be guaranteed a scholarship somewhere. it is much MUCH more difficult for a guy to get funded.
     
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  7. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    In my little slice of experience......I am not saying because it is my experience it is a universal truth......partially funded women's programs typically support partial scholys for eight women rather than full scholys for some of the top eight and nothing for the rest of the top eight.

    If a school does not fill 8 roster spots, there could be a variety of reasons.

    1. The school is undesirable for academic, athletic, location, or climate reasons

    2. There was an unexpected transfer out, or defection, or failure to academically qualify

    3. The coach is purposefully "banking" a scholy to save for the next incoming class.

    Even if a school is partially funded and is offering each girl a fraction of a full athletic scholy, they often find ways to make up the difference by using academic money to make up the difference. To find out how all this stuff works for each school, it is necessary to talk to the coach or AD office, I think
     
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  8. dbordel

    dbordel New User

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    Ok, I think I understand that. So since they do not have enough money to fund all 8, they do not care that a partial counts as a full scholarship according to NCAA.
     
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  9. dbordel

    dbordel New User

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    The guy that runs the academy where she drills has said that there are many schools who leave women's scholarships on the table every year. I am encouraged by that, but for us, I don't think it changes the game plan. She still wants to work to be the best she can be by the time she is recruitable. We live in a competitively deep state and I want to assume many of her peers will be competing for the same schools. I want her to have the broadest scope of options within a reasonable distance from where we live now. Ultimately it is up to her though - if she wants to go to school far away, that is her decision to make.
     
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  10. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    Let's say at College X, a full scholy would cost $40,000 for tuition, room and board, etc. AD determines that the women's tennis program will be funded up to $240,000 for scholys. Coach has the following options:

    1. Offer 3/4 scholys to eight girls, or $30,000 each....and try to make up the remaining $10,000 for each girl through available academic money. (In my experience this is the way it is done most often)

    2. Offer full scholys to six girls and nothing for the next two best girls.

    3. Offer fractions other than those suggested above that equate to being 3/4 funded.

    EDIT: In no case may more than eight girls receive any scholarship money
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2012
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  11. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

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    Misterbill,
    thanks for all the great information concerning womens college tennis.

    It would of been nice if you were posting here when my daughter went through the recruiting process.
     
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  12. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    Just to clarify for readers what you meant: No more than 8 girls may receive athletic scholarship money.
     
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  13. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    Correct.

    And thanks, Tennishacker. It is hoped that the recruiting process for your daughter ended up with the results she desired!
     
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  14. high and deep

    high and deep New User

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    What star recruit could garner a partial or full scholarship? Any 2 stars or 3 stars getting rides to D-1 programs?
     
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  15. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    For further clarification if a womens team is fully funded (8 full scholarships)the player either receives a full ride tennis scholarship or no athletic scholarship. In some cases this is why a coach with a fully funded program banks a scholarship not wanting to risk giving out a full scholarship to a player who may or may not be able to win at the coaches desired level.

    All Men's programs in DI, DII and NAIA are considered partially funded and the coach may give our full or partial tennis scholarships in whatever amount he/she sees fit.Partials for men are the norm, tuition, books and fees or roughly 50%.

    NOTE: Some women's programs may declare partial funding (less than 8 scholarships) then the coach may give out tennis scholarships in any amount they want.

    I've found two things helpful. Dig though the NCAA, NAIA and NJCAA scholarship regulations to find out more. Also, ask the coach how they are funded and what latitude they have in distributing their scholarships. I found the latter to be very helpful as nuance can occur from division to division, school to school and conference to conference, etc.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
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  16. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    For girls I would say that full scholarships for 2 and 3 stars are very likely. Probably not at the big time conferences, although I'm sure there are execptions. For boys 50% tennis scholarships is the norm. Again there are exceptions but full tennis scholarships for boys are rare. For boys looking for max tennis scholarship money look at the smaller D1 schools, NAIA and NJCAA.
     
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  17. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    Another way to say this is that women's tennis is a "head-count" sport and men's tennis is an "equivalency" sport.

    Head count sports are allocated X full scholarships that may be given to no more than X athletes. Football and volleyball are head count sports. In D1 there are currently 85 full scholys available in football and 12 in volleyball for fully-funded programs.

    Equivalency sports are allocated the equivalent of X full scholarships that may be divided up and given to no more than a set number of athletes, at the discretion of the coach. Baseball is an equivalency sport. In D1 baseball there is the equivalent of 11.7 full scholys that may be allocated to no more than 27 players.

    If men's tennis is fully-funded, there is the equivalent of 4.5 full scholys that may be awarded. If men's tennis is partially funded, there is the equivalent of fewer than 4.5 that may be awarded.

    If women's tennis is fully-funded, there are 8 full scholarships that may be awarded to no more than 8 players. If women's tennis is partially funded, then no more than 8 players may receive scholarships in amounts that reflect the proportion of partial funding.
     
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  18. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    The confusion here is that you are the only one I have ever encountered who uses the terminology in this way. "Partial scholarships" and "partially funded" are two different things. If you ask an NCAA men's Division I tennis coach if his program is fully funded, he will answer yes if he has been given 4.5 scholarships to allocate, and no if he has been given less than 4.5, in which case he would also say that he is only partially funded.
     
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  19. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    ^^^I learned the terminology from Billy Pate and numerous other college coaches and reading the rules. Maybe you could look over the rules and point out my misinterpretation. Not a challenge, I welcome the learning opportunity.

    Merry Chistmas.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
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  20. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    The NCAA prescribes the maximum number or equivalency of scholarships for each sport.

    If a school's athletic department offers the maximum allowed by the NCAA, the sport is considered fully-funded.......meaning fully-funded compared to the maximum allowed by the rules. If it offers less than the maximum, the sport is considered partially funded compared to the maximum allowed by the rules.

    If this is confusing, we could say a school offers the maximum amount or less than the maximum amount, I suppose.

    Anyway, whatever the terminology, I hope readers understand the substance of the distinction by now.

    EDIT: In equivalency sports, such as men's tennis, a fully-funded program may.....and always does...... offer partial scholarships. If they didn't, men's tennis teams would have 4 players on the roster and the baseball team would have 11. So it is true that fully-funded equivalency sports offer partial (less than full) scholarships to players. Fully-funded "head-count" sports do not offer partial scholarships to players. If a "head-count" sport offers partial scholarships that means it is not fully-funded.

    Here's a random link: (scroll down below the chart)

    http://www.berecruited.com/resources/recruiting-assistance-from-qput-me-in-coachq/ncaa-scholarship-allotment
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
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  21. tball2day

    tball2day Semi-Pro

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    50% boys scholarships are not the norm at least for freshman, but it depends on where they play on the team. #1 will see a full, #2 maybe (or not) #3 maybe (or not) and the rest will get what is left (2.5 or 1.5) remaining divided between them possibly all the way down to players 8-10 depending on the program and who the coach wants to give it to. 50% is a great scholarship for a boy and not usually achieved by a freshman, unless they go in at the top range of the line up which is not the case for competitive teams except extreme circumstances. The #1 recruit in the country won't get a full because they go to a top school where they aren't playing a top spot. Surprising but true.

    Agree with Clark and Misterbill on terminology of fully/partial funding. Boys fully funded at 4.5, girls at 8. It would be great if there was a list of schools and the # of full scholarships funded. From what I understand Vanderbilt has either 1 or none boys scholarships and Davidson has 2 total. Some girls programs are not fully funded either for 8. I believe they tend to be the better privates where kids are just happy to use tennis to get them in.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
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  22. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    I agree that the prime candidates for partially-funded women's programs are Mid-Major and below private schools. I expect Southern Cal, Stanford and Wake Forest, for example, are fully-funded.

    Women in partially-funded tennis programs, of course, have access to merit-based and need-based aid, if offered by the school, to further offset the cost of matriculation. These are issues players should be asking about during the recruiting process
     
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  23. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    OK. I concede I've been using incorrect terminology. I hope I have not confused the question. Thanks.
     
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