FYB's Singles Playbook

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by safc_number10, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. safc_number10

    safc_number10 New User

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    Did anyone purchase this course from the Fuzzy Yellow Balls team?

    I was just wondering what peoples thoughts on it was and whether or not they found it useful.

    I can purchase it for $100 and even though I can get my money back I'm still unsure if it will be worth that price.
     
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  2. axel89

    axel89 Banned

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    FYB is the best tennis site do it!
     
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  3. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    I honestly can't fathom what recreational singles advice would be worth $100.
     
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  4. Tournament Player

    Tournament Player Banned

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    FYB is idiotic, they have no idea what they are taking about, it is complete BS
     
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  5. VeeSe

    VeeSe Rookie

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    Well, people take lessons for ~$50/hr, so.... this is equivalent to paying for two lessons. It's not too outrageous.
     
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  6. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    I think it is completely outrageous. Taking a lesson gets you 1 on 1 advice tailored particularly to your game. You simply can't replicate that otherwise- the closest would be videotaping your strokes and then asking for advice for how to improve but that is a poor substitute for being able to get immediate feedback.

    Spending $100 on singles strategy is absolutely nuts. I just don't understand what they could be saying that you couldn't get from any number of books from amazon or whatever free advice is already available on the internet. Singles strategy is so dependent on your opponent that I simply cannot fathom what advice would be worth paying $100 for at the rec level.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2012
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  7. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Go crosscourt until you get something short, then go DTL.

    Exploit your opponent's weaknesses.

    Come to net when you hurt your opponent.

    ++++++++++

    I accept Visa, MC and American Express.
     
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  8. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    Do you have a paypal?
     
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  9. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

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    I thought you said you were terrible at singles. I want a discount!
     
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  10. goober

    goober Legend

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    Well you know they say those that can't do TEACH! She doesn't have to be able to do it herself. She just has to tell you what you should be doing:)
     
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  11. sundaypunch

    sundaypunch Hall of Fame

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    So you have no idea what is on the tape yet you are willing to rip the guy? Nice. Pardon him for trying to make a living with tennis.
     
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  12. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    If someone paid $100 for a little hologram you wear on their wrist to increase power or magic beans then I would think they were getting ripped off as well. Some people just throw their money away.

    As I said I cannot fathom what rec player singles advice would be worth $100. I think it would be absolutely nuts to pay. And yes I would laugh hard at any of my friends who paid that.

    If we aren't talking about rec tennis and instead this is is a pro or even a guy trying to get a college scholarship then its a different story. But even then I still think that $100 would be better spent elsewhere since it would be generic advice not at all tailored to the person paying the money.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2012
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  13. sundaypunch

    sundaypunch Hall of Fame

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    Occasionally I forget the demographic on this site. It doesn't take long to be reminded.
     
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  14. goober

    goober Legend

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    Yah the demographic that got suckered into giving their email to FYB for some free material and now receiving endless spam from them and those affiliated with them constantly trying to sell something.- Your last chance to learn footwork of the pros $50! Secrets to a massive kick serve $100! Inside information of the Bryan bros doubles strategy $400!
     
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  15. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

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    Eh, people spend money on all sorts of irrational things - eg many will gladly pay $30-40 for a tennis shirt that has 'adidas' or 'nike' on it, vs $10-15 for the same thing sans logos at target.

    Anyway, best tip for singles: get fit, and when you're on the court, focus on your footwork and don't get lazy. Most other things follow from that.
     
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  16. sundaypunch

    sundaypunch Hall of Fame

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    You know, you could just click the "unsubscribe" button, lol.
     
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  17. Nostradamus

    Nostradamus G.O.A.T.

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    Isn't going crosscourt low percentage ?
     
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  18. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    The OP wanted to know what people's thoughts were on spending $100 on recreational singles tennis advice. Why should I not say that I think it would be ridiculous to spend $100 on that? There are people who get suckered into buying powerbands, phiten necklaces, and all sorts of other ridiculous things.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2012
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  19. safc_number10

    safc_number10 New User

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    Interesting thoughts everyone. I'm a little surprised that nobody has tried any paid for material out.

    I receive regular on court coaching (£20/25 per session) but I sometime find that online tennis videos have reinforced or reminded me of things that I have been shown previously. Probably give this course a miss.
     
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  20. goober

    goober Legend

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    I eventually had to, but if they just sent me occasional notices instead of numerous final and "last chance" reminders I would have kept them on the email list just to see what they were putting out.
     
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  21. sundaypunch

    sundaypunch Hall of Fame

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    Incorrect.

    The OP wanted to know specifically if anyone had purchased the FYB course, and whether they found it useful. "I haven't purchased the course but spending $100 on it is nuts" is not helpful.

    It is similar to someone wanting to know specifics about Playmate Volley and saying "ball machines are useless, just rally with real people".

    Unless the OP is a kindergartener, he realizes that there are many sources for information on singles strategy. He wants to know about the FYB course. The fact that this isn't obvious to you is why trying to explain this will be a waste of time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2012
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  22. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    sundaypunch- because you are in a different demographic I have a $300 singles course that I will let you have for just $50. I'll even throw in some magic beans and will let you have total enlightenment on your deathbed. Don't bother getting anyone else's opinion on it here because for some reason no one has bought this package on the site to this point so you don't have many people to ask about it (And no one to ask about the total enlightenment...).

    If someone asks about something and I think its a ripoff then I'l going to say so. I've read a ton of tennis books and seen a ton of videos (including many on the FYB site)- there is nothing about singles recreational strategy that I have ever seen that would be worth anything close to $100.

    If You want to say that you purchased it and that you think it was money well spent then by all means do so.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2012
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  23. mucat

    mucat Hall of Fame

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    Not if you hit them in.
     
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  24. arche3

    arche3 Banned

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    Hit one more ball over than the other guy. Save you 100 bucks.
     
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  25. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    No, it's a high percentage shot because:

    1) You are hitting over the low part of the net.

    2) The court is longer diagonally, therefore there's a better chance
    of the ball staying in.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012
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  26. theblueark

    theblueark New User

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    I have the Singles Playbook and a couple of other courses I purchased. Singles Playbook is one of Will's weakest products, I don't recommend it at all.

    Also, these days he seems focused on pumping out more and more products (some pretty substandard) and doesn't check back on his previous ones. There are portions with missing videos and he doesn't reply to comments or address issues.

    My latest purchase is Ian's (essentialtennis.com) Singles Domination. His videos are not as high tech and nifty as Will's but he's a lot more down to earth and sincere and replies to every comment and question posted.
     
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  27. leroy_sunset

    leroy_sunset Rookie

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    I emailed and complained about the spam. It was out of hand. Will (the FYB guy) actually emailed me back and apologized!
     
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  28. tenniscasey

    tenniscasey Semi-Pro

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    Is there anything in the Singles Playbook that a lower-NTRP rec player wouldn't pick up on from paying attention to strategy during a few pro matches?
     
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  29. F. Perry

    F. Perry Banned

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    I used to listen to his podcast and enjoyed it, there was a lot of good advice. But I can't stand how he breaks EVERYTHING down into three constituent parts. Having every stroke, strategy, movement broken down into three elements often doesn't help at all.
     
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  30. theblueark

    theblueark New User

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    I honestly don't remember much of what was in Singles Playbook. The content was pretty bad, especially compared to his previous product, Tennis Ninja (which was excellent, I felt). I do remember there were videos where he attempted to show a few "plays" of some of the top players. How agassi moves the opponent side to side, how mcenroe slices down the middle to cut off angles. Then he shows drills to practice those "plays". But while watching the drills I mostly see the strategy failing and the practice partner winning the points instead.

    Haha I never noticed that. These days he hardly updates the podcasts though, seems like he's more busy with his video courses.
     
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  31. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    The problem with the Singles Playbook is that it was positioned as a course that taught you the same plays the pros use (which it does), but I didn't actually show you the pros doing them. I merely diagrammed them on my dry-erase board. So despite what I viewed as valuable information, some people's expectations weren't met.

    I'm learning from my mistakes and constantly trying to provide more value to the tennis community. Singles Playbook 2.0 is on the way. We're paying $34,000 in footage licenses (yes, you read that right) and will have the top pros in action! You'll be able to see exactly how they run these plays and how you can too.
     
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  32. Nostradamus

    Nostradamus G.O.A.T.

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    Will, i am finding that working out for CORE strength with medicine ball is doing Magic. Accidently found out while vacuming the house with heavy cannister vacume. :) but anyhow, which weight medicine ball should i buy ? 4, 6, 8 or 10 lbs ball. and also soft or hard ball ?

    Also any specific Core workout you recommend with medicine ball ?
     
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  33. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Putting aside the Singles Playbook, I think there's a lot players at all levels of the game can learn about strategy. Another poster remarked that paying $100 to learn about strategy was too much - I couldn't disagree more.

    Even the pros continue to learn. A few days ago I was at the US Open meeting with Sven Groeneveld. He's one of the top coaches in the world. He was saying how HawkEye data is about to be released, and how that will have important strategic implications for the pro game.

    Where does Federer serve most frequently down 15 - 30? How about Nadal? Does Serena hit more down-the-line backhands later in a match? Etc. Will have a big impact on anticipation. Another layer to an already complicated chess match.

    So... if things get that complicated at the pro level, and the pros are still learning, I certainly think recreational players shouldn't stand pat or be satisfied with some basic understanding of strategy.

    If you want to start right now, here's a cool way to watch the US Open. Pick a particular player and watch how they move during a point. Don't watch the ball.

    Slightly more advanced - if you can track both, watch how their lateral positioning changes when they hit down the line versus cross court. And how their vertical positioning changes if they hit a good shot, bad shot, drop shot, etc.
     
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  34. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    I'm not a fitness trainer so I steer clear of giving specific advice here. I'm sure you can find some stuff on Youtube. But what I can say is that core strength is HUGE for tennis. I do Pilates three times a week and the core strength and flexibility it has given me has improved not only my tennis, but my life in general.

    General advice - keep doing it =)

    (Speaking of Pilates, it was recommended to me by Mike Bryan. Congrats to the Bryan Bros! Just won the US Open doubles title!)
     
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  35. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    I've always been a fan of both Will and Ian. However, I had the absolute pleasure of taking a lesson with Ian once, and WOW. He was great, the lesson was different from every other lesson I'd taken up until then (and since), and I still remember the things we worked on.

    Both offer a lot for free, too...so they make things very accessible.
     
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  36. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Ian's a beast. No doubt about it.
     
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  37. goober

    goober Legend

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    My view is that the #1 and #2 problems with adult rec level players are technical flaws and fitness. There is such a huge divide between adult rec level players and pros in these things that advanced levels strategy are not very applicable. If you say in certain situation, hit a kicker out wide the BH, well most rec players can't even hit the shot in the first place. What Serena, Fed and Nadal do it certain situations is only valuable if the rec player can has a full range of strokes at their command. Where you serve at 15-30 won't really matter that much if your serve is not very good to begin with.

    I almost think a more valuable strategy guide for rec players is what you should do in certain situations based on your limitations- ie. weak backhand, limited fitness, below average serve, ect.
     
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  38. sansaephanh

    sansaephanh Professional

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    Massive amounts of hate for FYB. They're obviously more qualified then a bunch of randoms in a subforum commenting on videos.

    Don't knock FYB for just trying to make tennis easier to learn.
     
    #38
  39. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    True, there is a huge divide. But whenever we talk about the pros we only focus on what recreational players can copy. We never talk about how to hit a 130 MPH serve, etc.

    What I don't buy is that technical limitations mean you shouldn't worry about strategy. Your backhand is your weaker shot so opponents pick on it? Same thing happens to Federer.

    The most obvious example that strategy is important at the recreational level is the pusher. Uglier strokes than you, less technical ability, yet he still beats you. Why is that? Because he has a very rudimentary strategy (keep the ball in and deep) and you don't know how to counteract it. That rudimentary strategy beats your superior strokes.
     
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  40. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the support. Appreciate it. Just the nature of the Internet I guess. I long ago learned to expect and ignore it. To quote the rap game, "haters gon' hate."
     
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  41. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    I remember being cross-eyed and fighting nausea by the end...he ran my arse off...

    But it became pretty clear in that lesson that footwork and fitness were two areas that needed a lot of improvement!

    Keep on doing what you're doing Will...many people appreciate it and take advantage of it. Plus it looks like a lot of fun!
     
    #41
  42. theblueark

    theblueark New User

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    Nice to see you here, Will. To give some context, when I first started tennis with zero knowledge, I learnt EVERYTHING (forehand, backhad, etc) from the FYB free videos. Never had a coach. I loved the concept of breaking down the forehand into the essentials (starting with unit turn, I never picked up arming the ball because of this).

    Then you released Tennis Ninja, and I was excited and bought the course. The lessons were invaluable and and loved them. I learnt all the basic strategy from the course, especially directionals. The content was pretty top notch. All the videos were available and you even replied to some comments people left behind on each video.

    One of the biggest problems I feel with your other products is missing content and unanswered questions. I remember there are some videos which cannot be downloaded and people have commented on it but with no reply. Module 5 from the bonus Video Bootcamp is also missing with many people asking about it, the latest being 6 months ago. No replies too.

    I guess people (well, I state for myself) start to feel a little abandoned. Especially when we see new content coming out, Yan's stuff, Doubles Playbook, etc. What happens to us left behind in FYB premium, Singles Playbook, the Bootcamp series (which is still missing the backhand bootcamp)?

    I still am a giant fan of Tennis Ninja and review the videos once in a while. The Doubles Playbook free videos look excellent and I was extremely tempted to subscribe, but in the end my decision not to was mainly for the fear of being neglected again.
     
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  43. sansaephanh

    sansaephanh Professional

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    Anytime Will!

    I'm a huge advocate of FYB because of your great analytical breakdowns of everything from strokes to mentality. I've learned a good amount from you guys in regards to returns and kick serves.

    A question though. What happened to the forums? I know it was slow moving in there (maybe 10 people lol) but it was nice to get you guys to talk to us when you could.
     
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  44. axel89

    axel89 Banned

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    OMG WIL HAMILTON!
    anyways ive watched your videos and they have helped me in doubles alot!
     
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  45. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I'm with Goober, to a certain extent. For background, I started as a 2.5 and am now 4.0.

    Early on, I tried to implement singles strategy. I learned the directionals. It didn't work. (Meaning I didn't win). The reason wasn't that the strategies were wrong or bad. I simply didn't have the mechanics to execute anything on a consistent basis.

    Take the pusher. One strategy for dealing with pushers is to take the net and so take away their time. Nice idea. Assuming you can hit an approach shot, a finishing volley and an overhead.

    Nowadays, I find it works better simply to develop consistency in my strokes and work on fitness and agility. For that, I think clinics and lessons are a better way to improve at my level than videos on strategy. If you can't execute the shots, all the strategy in the world won't help you much.

    That said, I do find a lot of value in FYB (and Essential Tennis) content on stroke mechanics. I also enjoy watching the pros implement strategy. Most of the time, I find myself thinking, "I'd beat everybody if I could do *that.*"
     
    #45
  46. emilyhex

    emilyhex Rookie

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    Here is another excellent tennis instruction site: www.youtube.com

    The best thing is if you don't get better, there is no buyer's remorse to deal with.
     
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  47. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Thanks. Glad we've been able to help and I appreciate the feedback.

    I can't begin to describe what the last year has been like. Mostly exhilarating but frustrating at times as well. I started FYB in my parents' basement with Adam Sieminski, a friend since first grade. We saw how Facebook was changing the way we communicated with our friends, and how iTunes was changing the way we listened to music, and we believed that the Internet could also change the way tennis was taught and learned.

    We believed that it would increase access to the game for those who couldn't afford an expensive club, or more simply didn't live near one. We believed that it would allow recreational players to take their games above and beyond what was possible given their access to instruction at the time. On-court lessons, books, etc.

    About two years ago things really took off, and the last 18 months or so have been particularly crazy. Basically, ever since we worked with the Bryan Bros. Obviously that's awesome, but the frustrating part has been the growing pains we've gone through. Things that were easy to stay on top of a few years ago are now difficult as the demands on our time have increased. We're still a two-man shop, although we're about to hire.

    None of this is meant to be an excuse. If I've lost your trust then it's my responsibility to earn it back, and that's what I'm going to try to do. We started off as two kids wet behind the ears (I'm now 30 - yikes!) and we're becoming better businessmen by the day. Running the website is similar to a tennis match. You make some unforced errors along the way but ultimately it's the score at the end of the match that matters.

    Thanks again for the constructive criticisms. Please keep them coming.

    - Will
     
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  48. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Thanks! When we redesigned the website we took them down. We wanted to narrow the focus of what the site was all about. Also, as I alluded to above, it was tough for me to stay active given the demands on my time and I think, to a degree, there was an expectation that I would participate in the forums regularly which I couldn't meet.
     
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  49. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Thanks!

    10 char
     
    #49
  50. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Glad we've been able to help Cindy. Nice work improving so much!

    My experience has led me to a different conclusion than the one you reached. When you play a match, it's all about finding a way to win. You can do that with superior strokes. Superior strategy. Superior mental game. You can cheat, although I wouldn't recommend this last one!

    I really think the mechanics-only approach is counterproductive. It often leads to the wrong mindset. How many of you out there have played a match where you weren't playing well and, as a result, you concluded it wasn't your day, conceded on some level mentally, and lost?

    My guess is every single one of you reading this. I certainly have.

    I have a concept called "The Broken Racket." Theblueark, I'm sure you're familiar with it. I teach it in Tennis Ninja.

    Awhile back I was playing a buddy of mine. Very good player. I was up 4 - 2 in the final set of our match when I broke the strings in my last racket. Had to borrow one of his.

    I hate his racket. Feels like a two-by-four. I spent the next few games golfing balls into the back fence. It was really, really ugly.

    I was about to give up. "Hey, it's not my day. I'm playing terribly because of this racket. I've got a good excuse. I can lose this one."

    But that's not what the good tennis players do. They don't look for reasons to justify why they're losing. They find a way to win.

    So I proceeded to go full counterpuncher mode (arguably pushing off my forehand side - it was really tough to keep the ball in!). Backed up several feet and just made sure I retrieved everything. My buddy missed a few shots and got a little frustrated, probably in part because I was doing OK with his racket. Went to a tiebreaker and I ended up edging him out.

    So now whenever I feel like it's not my day I always think about "The Broken Racket." Strokes aren't the only reason you win a match, and you shouldn't tie your fortunes to them. There are plenty of ways to win.

    Hope that helps!

    Will
     
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