Gamma T7 - essentially a modified G325?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by sstchur, Jul 12, 2009.

  1. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

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    I know it sounds crazy, especially to those of you who use / have used (I have not) and love the G325, but hear me out.

    Now, since the G325 is discontinued, I could not find the specs on TW, but I did see them here: http://************.com/gamma-g325-tennis-racquets-p-14054.html

    Are those spec accurate? I'm assuming yes, and much of what I have to say hinged upon that assumption.

    Gamma's web site has some specs but not all, and as I bing for information, I find all kinds of discrepancies, but from the best I can work with, here's what I've found about the two racquets:

    325 Width: 19mm or 20mm (depending on where you get your specs)
    T-7 Width: 20mm

    325 Headsize: 95 sq in
    T-7 Headsize: 100 sq in

    325 Flex: 58
    T-7 Flex: 57 (TW), 58 (********)

    325 Length: 27 in
    T-7 Length: 27 in

    325 Swingweight: 307
    T-7 Swingweight: 313 (TW), 298 (********)

    325 Strung weight: 12oz
    T-7 Strung weight: 11.4oz

    325 Balance: 11pt headlight
    T-7 Balance: 6pt headlight

    If you grok the specs of the two, they're not shockingly different. Headsize jumps out at you, as does overall weight and balance.

    However, the overall weight and balance of the T-7 can match the G325 by adding the right amount of lead to the handle, no?

    In which case, the only major difference would be headsize.

    The more I analyze it, the more I feel like like the T-7 is like a reincarnated G325 that's been made a tad lighter with a slightly larger head.

    Seems like just adding lead to it gives you something darn close to what you'd have w/ the G325.

    Am I crazy? Or missing something really obvious?
     
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  2. Gasquetrules

    Gasquetrules Semi-Pro

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    Thinner beam...

    The beam thickness is 18 mm. I own five G325s. I've checked them with a dial caliper. They are right at 18 mm.

    Forget about what the posted specs are. Get ahold of one and check it for yourself. The G325 is noticably thinner than something like a typical Dunlop 200G or Head Prestige Tour or the other 20 mm frames you find.

    Strung, the frame weighs about 12 ounces; a tenth or two more if you have an overgrip and string dampener.

    They are 10 to12 points headlight. Depends on if you have an overgrip or dampener.

    I've never seen or hit with a T-7. But it looks and specs more like the Head frame Djokovic plays with, or at least as far as dimensions are concerned.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2009
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  3. ced

    ced Semi-Pro

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    I've had and played both and irrespective of the specs they are not alike. The G325 is definitely a player's stick and a great S&V racquet ... the T7 is more of a low powered TWEENER and a very good baseliner's stick .... both are good for doubles, but the G325 is definitely superior in all respects. I had 5 G325's and 2 T7's and they were my main racquets for a couple of years. I went to the T7 hoping it would be and play close to the G325, but it didn't (not that it played badly- it just was not a G325) ........ the 330X and possibly the 320X are your better bets. The 330X is a more powerful and slightly stiffer G325.
     
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  4. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

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    Why do you put tweener in all capital letters? (just out of curiosity?)
     
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  5. canadave

    canadave Professional

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    It's an acronym. Tepidly Weighted Everlastingly Excellent Natural Enthusiast Racquet ;)
     
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  6. ced

    ced Semi-Pro

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    Didn't realize i did ... not meaning to demean the stick in any way , as it is really a fine racquet, but more in the tweener mold (as defined by TW) than the player mold (again as defined by TW)
     
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  7. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

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    No problem -- was just curious.

    After playing with it for a year or so, it seems to be my experience as well, which sort of puzzles me since the specs all seems to indicate very low powered, very control oriented. Nothing about the specs screams tweener to me really, but when I compare it to the Tour 330X, it does indeed seem to be more of a tweener.
     
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  8. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

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    Canadave: where in Canada are you from (assuming that I'm interpreting your alias correctly)?
     
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  9. ced

    ced Semi-Pro

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    Those very attributes make it one of the better Tweener racquets out there .... it really could be a game improver, but requires work and input on the users part.
     
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  10. canadave

    canadave Professional

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    You interpret correctly :) I'm just outside Liverpool, Nova Scotia. I moved to Alberta from NYC in 2000, and moved here a couple years ago.
     
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  11. Gasquetrules

    Gasquetrules Semi-Pro

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    Well, that's the best analysis I've heard on this comparison of Gamma racquets. Seems to be right on the mark. While the G325 makes a great SV stick, I'd describe it as a great all-court racquet. You really can do anything with it!

    BTW, what happened to those five G325 frames you were playing with? Do you still have them, and are you still playing with them?
     
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  12. ced

    ced Semi-Pro

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    I sold them. all very reasonably, here on the TW TT board, because I just could no longer find new ones. Went thru several racquets looking for a replacement then found the Fischer Mag Tour (nice racquet) which I used until the 330X came out.

    The T7's which I first tried as replacements for the G325s I donated to a start-up high school tennis team ...... they should make nice racquets for them.

    I think I'm set now with the 330X's.
     
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  13. counterpuncher

    counterpuncher Professional

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    Can you comment on the differences between the 330X and the Mag Tour ? I have a Mag Tour (UL spec with some lead) in my bag which I take out from time to time and have been curious about the 330X. Can you give a comparison of power, spin and stiffness differences ?
    I also have a V02 max in my bag and the 330X's specs are almost identical, apart from a more headlight balance. So I was wondering whether it'd be worth adding another racquet to my bag : ) Thanks.
     
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  14. ced

    ced Semi-Pro

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    My Mag tours were the SL (heavier ) versions .... loved them and would have stuck with them had I not hit with the 330X ... differences to me were the larger head of the Mags ... maybe a bigger sweet spot (great for doubles) ... and more flex and less power in the Mags. Both have a great feel to them when hitting the ball, but at my age the 330X gave me more pop (especially on serve) and was easier to swing ... both provide an amazing amount of control. I'm a flat ball hitter mainly, but would think the 330X would provide more spin, but I'm not the one to answer that question. I don't think you could go wrong with either stick.
     
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  15. Gasquetrules

    Gasquetrules Semi-Pro

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    Question for Ced

    Ced, I'm curious. If you had five G325s, why quit playing with them simply because they were no longer readily available? I would think five of them would last you a good while.
     
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  16. ced

    ced Semi-Pro

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    Age

    As you are aware the G325 is a pretty low powered racquet .... really an ideal racquet for a young agile player who easily supplies his own power.

    I'm in my 70's, and yes 5 G325's would have lasted the rest of my life. Tho I can still move, I'm hardly agile anymore and I needed some racquet help to maintain some 'pop' on my serve. So I went looking for an easy to swing stick with as much control and feel , but more power than the G325. Hence my most recent progression from the G325 thru the T7 to the Fischer Mag Tour to the 330X.

    I've hit a lot of racquets over the years and know that as you age change becomes necessary.

    There, I've been exposed.
     
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  17. canadave

    canadave Professional

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    Not in the slightest :) Tennis is a game for all ages equally legitimately, and your opinions on racquets (and anything else for that matter) have no less weight than if you were in your 20's. It does help to know your age range so that your racquet opinions can be put in some context (i.e. a 24-year-old hefting the KPS88 would be less of a surprise than someone of your age hefting one, for the agility reasons you mention!)

    Interestingly, my decision to buy the 330X was largely based on your glowing review a couple of weeks back in my "has anyone demoed the 330X" thread, but was only finalized when I asked my dad (who's 70) to demo the racquet for a day (he still plays tennis too). He came away with almost exactly the same review, for almost exactly the same reasons, and that sealed the deal for me--and I'm "only" in my late 30's. To me, a quality stick is a quality stick, no matter how old the person lifting it. Fascinating now, in light of your "revelation", that the two of you should have such similar reactions to the 330X! :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2009
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  18. ced

    ced Semi-Pro

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    I would imagine your dad and I grew up with sticks in common : Wilson Kramer's, Dunlop Forts ,etc; possibly a Trabert Graphite before we hit with the more modern sticks, and when we find one that hits like 'they used to' it clicks.

    My very 1st at my 10th Xmas was a Harry C. Lee (wood of course) and many, many have followed.
     
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  19. counterpuncher

    counterpuncher Professional

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    Thanks for your reply I'm surpised but glad to hear that the 330X provides more pop than the Mag. One final question, what is the response from the upper hoop like in the 330X ? As I hit high up in the string bed, it is generally an issue for me with a lot of racquets when the sweetspot is in the middle to lower half of the racquet head. Thanks.
     
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  20. ced

    ced Semi-Pro

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    ummm.... I tend to hit the opposite (middle-lower) so I may not be the one to ask... this morning I deliberately tried to hit in the upper hoop and was not too bothered by it ....

    The Mag Tour having most of its flex in the throat, while providing a pretty firm sting bed (due to the Fischer beam design) would seem ideal for you. I would think the poly crosses I use in my 330X would help stabilize its head, but with all gut or multi you would probably not find hitting in the upper hoop comfortable (if that makes sense).
     
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