Getting out of the doldrums

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by IA-SteveB, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    I play a variety of sports in the winter, like volleyball, hockey and tennis. I play volleyball on Tuesday nights and then doubles tennis on Thursday and Sunday men's league with an occasional USTA match on the weekends.

    Lately, I have felt like nothing is going right. I haven't won a single USTA match in this winter season and I have moved down to the lowest court in league play after being as high as the second court, which has very high 3.5 players or fringe 4.0's. I don't want to sound like a jerk and no disrespect is intended, but I look at the players I am with on the lowest court and rhetorically wonder how I got there. My volleyball team is listless and doesn't seem to care so we are losing at that too.

    The result of this is that I get very frustrated at tennis. I never used to get down mentally, but if I make an unforced error on a groundstroke or frame a volley I really get down on myself and that is pretty uncharacteristic. I haven't been playing as well as I know I can but I also realize that moving down at league can be attributed to factors out of my control, i.e. players not doing well in the set they play with me. (we rotate players for three sets and the lowest game winner moves down a court the next week)

    I don't know if I should take a step back from all sports for a few weeks and get away from it or figure out some way to regain focus and confidence right now so I can get back on track. Losing itself doesn't bother me, but it's the way I have been losing, i.e. letting people back in matches we were in control of.

    My bad mood is carrying over into all rec sports I play and playing well seems to be more of a surprise than an expectation lately. :(
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2013
    #1
  2. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

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    If you are rusty or have lost some of your timing, playing doubles sets is not a good way to get your groove back:
    - You are dependent on your partner to some degree
    - Dubs points are short and not many rallies
    - Playing sets can be stressful if you're not having any success

    My advice would be to set up a singles hitting session with someone around your level. Get out there, hit, get your timing and groove back, don't stress, have fun.

    The rest will follow.
     
    #2
  3. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Sometimes when I'm struggling in matches all it takes is one good practice hitting session to self correct and get my timing back.
     
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  4. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    is it the winter blues? get some sunlight in the mornings. read a book outdoors or go for a walk in the park.

    in terms of your game, i agree with a singles practice session. only have one or two things max that you want to focus on. major theme is just to play freely and have a good time.

    also, are you watching the Australian Open? i sometimes find watching slams gets me excited about the sport. however, this won't work if you idolise a particular player and he is playing badly too.
     
    #4
  5. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    Thanks for the advice, all. Yes, I do think you guys are right about getting some singles in with a good hitting partner. Most of my sessions are match play, so no chance to work on anything in particular.
     
    #5
  6. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    Happens to most people (I would assume). When I hit a bad patch, I usually just step away for a while and forget about tennis for a week. Then when I come back, things seem *sunnier*.
     
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