Getting rid of elbow pain

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Mikael, Sep 16, 2012.

  1. Mikael

    Mikael Professional

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    Hi everyone,

    Over the last couple years I've been facing a difficult situation: whenever I play more than 3 hours on two consecutive days I start feeling pain right between the forearm and the biceps. I guess it could be some mild form of golfer's elbow (I say mild because the pain always goes away after playing and I never have to stop playing because of the pain). If I play less frequently (on non consecutive days) I don't get this problem, but I've recently been trying to play more often so it is getting in the way...

    What could I do to prevent this from happening? I have started using an antivibrator again, but it doesn't seem to help much. In terms of strings I have always used polyester, going from Babolat Hurricane Tour to Tecnifibre Red Code to Signum Pro Tornado (I tried a very thin gauge, 1.18mm, to see if it helped but it didn't). I also string quite low, around 45lbs.

    Has anyone else faced the same problem? How did you get rid of it? Any advice is welcome!

    Thanks!
     
    #1
  2. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    I've had to deal with this ever since I started playing with a heavier and stiffer racquet. There are three stretches that I have found to be effective.

    1. Yoga inner forearm stretch.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UMSIq82tkQ

    2. A little more advanced than above. Stand arms length from a wall and place your palm against the wall with a straight arm, parallel to the floor, and the fingertips pointing towards the floor (or at about 45 degrees). Keep your arm in place and slowly rotate your upper body away from the wall, so that your back is eventually parallel to the wall (as much as possible). Adjust your position until you feel the stretch in the affected area. Hold it for about 30 seconds and repeat. It should feel good. This video kind of shows the motion, but I rotate the hand outward more and then pivot the body away more than he does. http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&fe...&v=l42JzR00TzY

    3. Lie on the floor on your side with your affected arm in the serve "Trophy Position". In other words, your arm should be on the floor and bent at a right angle, with the upper arm perpendicular to your body and the elbow bent at 90 degrees. Leave your arm in place and slowly move your upper body backwards towards the bent arm. You can use the other arm to help move and support your body. You should feel the stretch in the shoulder and adjust it around until you feel it in the affected area. Rinse and repeat. It should also feel good, and not painful.
     
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  3. Mikael

    Mikael Professional

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    Thanks. When do you perform these stretches? Before playing, after playing? Anytime during the day?
     
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  4. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    There are many well illustrated recent replies on golfer's elbow and tennis elbow.

    You have an unknown injury. Don't play or stress an injured arm or start any stretches or exercises until you have a Dr's diagnosis. Playing on tennis elbow or golfer's elbow could lead to a chronic condition such as tendinosis (permanent defective microscopic healing?) in a short time as described in the recent threads.
     
    #4
  5. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    Before and after tennis and anytime I do yoga. Pay attention to the pain and don't do anything that causes pain.
     
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  6. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Consider getting a Thera-band Flexbar and doing the Tyler Twist exercises: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zB3TVb8a5mk
    As you don't have pain between sessions, you can probably start out with the green.


    Dumbell curls, reverse curls and pronation/supination exercises specifically target the forearm, and are the last of the exercises described in the Thrower's Ten: http://www.muhlenberg.edu/pdf/main/athletics/athletic_training/throwers10.pdf


    Any chance of using a softer string for a while like natural gut or a multifilament? How about compromising with a hybrid set up?


    How stiff is your frame?
     
    #6
  7. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    1 Alleve before tennis, 2 after. It'll rip up your stomach if you do it habitually, but it is a short term solution to mask the pain.
     
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  8. Mikael

    Mikael Professional

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    Thanks for the advice everyone.

    charliefederer, my frame isn't stiff, it's a Head Pro Tour 630. I may try a hybrid setup next time to see if it helps.
     
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