Give me one piece of advice to help me win tonight.

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by Surecatch, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    I'm playing my last match tonight. I'm in a non-USTA 3.5 singles league. I'm 0-5. It's a typical story...all the games are close, but I just haven't learned to put people away yet. I've practice all the time, light bulbs are going off occasionally....a real game is coming together. Very soon, I'm going to cross that rubicon and start winning close instead of losing close. I want that first victory to be tonight. Last match, I got close........lost to the league champ 6-4, 6-4. I pressed him hard. Previously, I'd lost to him 6-1, 6-2.

    Tonight's the night. Anything to help is appreciated. My time is now. The sooner I can conquer this, the sooner I can dominate and move up. I play so much better against players with real games than I do against players with pusher games. I expressed this frustration to a coach I've been getting lessons from and he said "don't worry, just keep working...you are developing a real tennis game. One day when it all comes together, pusher games won't be able to touch you anymore."

    I'm right at the lip of that cup.
     
    #1
  2. RF20Lennon

    RF20Lennon Legend

    Joined:
    May 2, 2011
    Messages:
    7,304
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Trust your shots and go for it! Sometimes I get nervous and become defensive but just go for it you might miss some but if it clicks you're on!!
     
    #2
  3. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,375
    Keep up the hard work. It may take a while, but watch out when your whole game starts clicking.

    I remember being in your spot. I just came back to tennis after a long break. Couldn't win a match. Kept at it and a few moths later I crushed a few opponents that used to beat me and drive me nuts.

    I'd say don't put the emphasis on winning. You can't control winning, focus on playing well and playing your best. How you play is the one thing you usually can control. Putting to much pressure to win tonight may derail the whole thing.

    If you have a problem closing out a lead, IIRC from Winning Ugly, just pretend you're behind and play like you have to catch up.
     
    #3
  4. Sakkijarvi

    Sakkijarvi Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2007
    Messages:
    505
    Here's what I told my kids when I was teaching them tennis some years ago.

    When you are the underdog, playing someone better or a better team, when you get a chance to win a set or the match, go for it. What I mean is at set or match point, think ace or winner, not rally. Better players can always dial it back to out-steady you, so if you play passively, you'll watch the few chances you have to win ... slip away.

    Over and over again.

    IMO you are better served going for it, two serves for an ace, that kind of thing. What I see often in my own circles is the lesser player ... (whom may well be 'lesser' because of the inability to win that handful of points that matter, to put the other guy away when they have the chance) ... get conservative just when they're up 5-1, or at set or match point. Then lament yet another loss, letting it slip away.

    Be aggressive ... you have nothing to lose and even if you do go down, you'll go down fighting.
     
    #4
  5. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,541
    Play 3/4 speed. This sounds passive but it usually results in a more aggressive game. Most people pull back under pressure and end up playing timid and decelerating racket speed. On EVERY stroke (except volleys), think accelerate to 3/4 of maximum speed. If 10 is as fast as you can swing, you want to swing at 7.5 through out the match. All serves and ground strokes should be 7.5 out of 10. This level is also low enough to allow plenty of room for consistency and placement.
     
    #5
  6. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,335
    Hit it to his backhand on every shot.

    You're welcome.
     
    #6
  7. Mike Y

    Mike Y Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2011
    Messages:
    182
    Location:
    Bay Area
    Go for a tweener. If you pull it off, your opponent will be so in awe of you that he will just give you the match.
     
    #7
  8. NTRPolice

    NTRPolice Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2012
    Messages:
    568
    Never let up and never lose focus. If you're "in it to win it" then you need to come out strong and maintain that level the entire course of the match. A hunter does not turn their back to a downed or wounded prey. Make "nice nice" time is after you've finished them. Some people will even try to "chat you up" during the match as "strategy".

    You should be as focused on the first point as you are on the last. Your level of focus determines what type of shot and the quality of the shot that you play. If you lose your focus will you find yourself playing stupid and unusual shots that you normally wouldnt play, like hitting extra hard/soft, or going for more/less.
     
    #8
  9. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    15,095
    My goodness. Relax already. No good can come from putting too much pressure on yourself.

    There are no quick fixes. Just take your time, set up on every ball, and hit a quality ball every single time. If you hit four *quality* balls in a row, you will win that point.

    That's the number: Four. Four quality balls in a row.

    Good luck!!!
     
    #9
  10. GenesisTurbo

    GenesisTurbo Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    57
    Location:
    NJ
    don't do stupid shots, trust in yourself, stay focus and you will do fine.
     
    #10
  11. Fusker

    Fusker Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2012
    Messages:
    186
    I'd tweak this bit of advice as my recommendation and say that you should make sure you start at 75%. Basically, you want to work your way into the match and as you get your groove going, you can ramp up from there to 100%. Lots of guys come out banging away at 100% and next thing they know, they've lost the first set by throwing UEs in all over the place.
     
    #11
  12. TheCheese

    TheCheese Professional

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Messages:
    954
    Just play consistently and hit to his weakness when you have a chance. Don't try for winners, just keep the ball in play with moderate pace and play strategically.
     
    #12
  13. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    Thanks folks. I love reading your tips....I take a little from everything. To address some of the points, I don't put much pressure on myself to win, I just really want to. haha Seriously, who goes out there to lose? But yeah, playing well is always number one. When I lose and play well, I am supremely satisfied because I know that progress has occurred and winning will come. I know that at some point I will be hard to beat if I just keep working. Then I will dominate. Then I will move up to 4.0 level. This is my ambition now. I practice every day in some form or another, and it's amazing when some light bulb goes off in my head. For instance, I used to operate in the mindset that I could try to go big on my first serve and then play it ultra safe on the second. At some point I realized that to get to the next level with my serve I would have to first practice and develop it, and then both serves would be formidable. Now my first serve is not too much "bigger" than my second, but both are dialed down from when I tried to crush a first serve and would send it to the fence or something.

    The guy I'm playing tonight is beatable, but all the guys in my league are. This sounds self-serving but I am younger and much more athletic than anyone in my league. I just haven't been playing long and they have been playing for years and are crafty. As an adult, I played for a year in 2006, about three months in 2009, and I just started up again in late July. But I'm taking it seriously this time and attempting to become a real tennis player. I'm getting coaching, taking drills classes, and playing in two leagues. When I'm not doing that, I'm practicing or watching tennis with a "learning" eye. I learn a lot from watching DVR matches over and over again. I really pay attention to what the pros do and why it does or doesn't work for them.

    Thanks again, tennis peeps'......I got another half hour before I start getting ready. Further advice is appreciated. I'll post tomorrow on how I did.
     
    #13
  14. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2012
    Messages:
    1,976
    Go in not worrying about winning. If you win, great...you are 1-5. If you lose, no big deal. You have nothing to lose so just have a good time doing something you enjoy doing.
     
    #14
  15. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    And despite my overzealous way of transmitting my situation here on the board, that is what I always do. Tennis is fun. I play the game because I love it. Thanks.

    Tennis is life. Life is tennis.
     
    #15
  16. North

    North Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2005
    Messages:
    937
    Forget about winning or losing. Have fun. Watch the seams of the ball the whole match to keep focus. Remember to breathe. Forget about winning or losing.
     
    #16
  17. TheCheese

    TheCheese Professional

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Messages:
    954
    Play consistently and make him show you that he has the skill to beat you. Don't beat yourself by thinking you have to go for broke to beat this guy and end up making tons of UFEs.
     
    #17
  18. dcdoorknob

    dcdoorknob Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Messages:
    3,579
    Sounds to me like you're playing decently in general, but just psyching yourself out mentally on the big points.

    I know for me a problem I can run into on the big points is focusing on how much I want to win the point, and not on how I intend to win the point. "Man, I really want to win this one" doesn't actually help once the point is started. For me I started making myself forget about the outcome of the upcoming point and instead just focus specifically on what I want to do that point, and getting prepared to execute in that way.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2012
    #18
  19. Tennisguy3000

    Tennisguy3000 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    471
    Act like every point is the last point you will ever play in your life ;-) Adding (mental) dyer consequences to losing the point helps too...

    If this doesn't work for you, just play & have fun.... also works great. Sometimes a combo of the two depending on the score ;-)

    Good Luck!
     
    #19
  20. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Messages:
    2,440
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Serve every single ball to the backhand.
     
    #20
  21. Tennisguy3000

    Tennisguy3000 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    471
    Arthur Ashe has some good winning tips for you:

    http://timelesstennis.blogspot.ca/2010/03/book-excerpts-arthur-ashe-on-tennis.html

    Arthur Ashe on Tennis: Strokes, Strategy, Traditions, Players, Psychology and Wisdom, with Alexander McNab (Knopf, Inc., 1995) (143 Pages, with Foreword, 4 Introductory Articles, 6 Chapters)

    One of his insights was about "who" you really "play" in tennis. In a famous quote, Ashe remarked: "You are never really playing an opponent. You are playing yourself, your own highest standards. And when you reach your limits, that is real joy."

    Here are a few brief excerpts...

    Five Shots-a-Point Rule
    For club players, I have a comfortable rule of thumb. If, on every point you play, you hit the ball in five times, you are not going to lose any matches...steadiness is a habit; it is not something you turn on or off like a light bulb...start with steadiness; and then add aggression and power.

    Make Up Your Mind
    Indecision is a common problem for many players...You can take too long to make up your mind and end up trying a foolish play...In most situations, there is a bread-and-butter play that works ninety percent of the time...

    When You Get in Trouble
    Aim for the center strap of the net. If the ball passes over it at a reasonable speed, it should stay in, regardless of where you are on the court.

    The Important Points and The Important Games
    The first point of the game is key. After that, the points on the Ad side of the court are more important than the points on the Deuce side because you are either building a two-point lead...pulling even...or winning or fending off a game point...The first four games are important because that is the feeling out period of the match, and no one wants to lose his serve. I think Bill Tilden was right about the seventh game, which he identified as crucial. [That] is the place where you can forge or consolidate a winning lead...or...break your opponent's momentum.

    Make Your Opponent Hit the Shot He Hates
    Every player has a shot that he or she would rather not hit...If your opponent is shaky on overheads, lob a lot. If he doesn't like to come to net, feed him a lot of short balls. Chip away at your opponent's confidence by making him hit the shot he hates.

    Covering the Court
    Too many club players play as if they can cover the whole court, which cannot be done. Whoever configured the court back in the 1880s did a pretty good job because even the fastest players...cannot cover the whole court very well. You have to try to get your opponent to hit the ball where you can cover it, and within that area you can be more aggressive.

    Anticipation
    Anticipation...is the ability to size up a situation and intuitively guess where the ball is going to be before it gets there...It gives you a huge advantage...There is no question that experience helps you anticipate better. But [also] pay attention. If somebody hits a ball crosscourt to you, more than half the time you are going to hit it back crosscourt. The way a person holds the racquet has a lot to do with where he can hit a ball.

    Keys to Better Play
    1. Play with a decisive attitude
    2. Mix up your shots
    3. Have a plan on break point.
    4. Lob when you're in trouble.
    5. Hit approach shots down the line.
    6. Cover the open angles at net
    7. Get moving after you hit the ball
    8. Practice with a purpose

    What It Takes To Win
    It is not just the more talented player who wins. Some players may try a little harder. Some players may be a little smarter with strategy and tactics. Some players may be in better shape. Some players may have a better temperament for the game...To be a winner, you must be a fierce competitor as well as a shotmaker.

    Relish the Combat
    The sheer intensity of your competitive fire may be enough to overcome an opponent with more firepower in his strokes...you can get a psychological advantage by the body language you display on court...Always try to look like you are a winner, even if you are behind...a sustained look of control and confidence can give you a mental edge...

    See Yourself Succeeding
    Pancho Gonzales once told me that whenever he thought that a stroke of his was a little off, he would close his eyes and picture himself hitting the shot perfectly...Close your eyes before the point begins, and see yourself executing the shot, and then open your eyes and do it, without worrying too much about the result.

    Conditioning
    Vic Braden, when asked, "What's the first thing I should do to improve my tennis?" always answered "Lose five pounds." There is some truth to that...Most people play at a level or pace commensurate with their conditioning. If you improved your conditioning, you could play a lot more and a lot better.
     
    #21
  22. Mike Y

    Mike Y Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2011
    Messages:
    182
    Location:
    Bay Area
    Think about baseball...
     
    #22
  23. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW
    Given the lack of video or much info, if I had to give one piece of advice that works for Pros to beginners, it would be: don't hit any balls into the net.
     
    #23
  24. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,430
    Location:
    Make TT better, use the Ignore List!
    Hook him, especially on big points. It worked against me last night anyway.
     
    #24
  25. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,771
    It may be too late for tonight but, here's three tips from Marcus Cootsona's new book "OCCAM'S RACQUET":

    1) Get your first serve in.

    2) Return three balls in a row.

    3) Come in on a short ball.

    These three tips have worked for me to keep my mind focused on the match.

    G'luck
     
    #25
  26. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    6,598
    Just watch the ball!

    -Fuji
     
    #26
  27. cll30

    cll30 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    174
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I'm a little late to the party, but move your feet, get your racquet back early, and as stated above, watch the ball.
     
    #27
  28. kelkat

    kelkat Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Ad side
    So what happened????? Did you win? Did you play well?
     
    #28
  29. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    I lost, but I was generally satisfied with my play. As usual, I faded after about an hour, but I still found some very positive things happening with my game. My serve has gotten much more dangerous than a month ago, but my backhand is still a major liability.

    Strengths: footwork/athleticism, court demeanor, forehand, serve
    Weaknesses: Backhand, fitness, game/breakpoints slipping away.

    I swear, every match I lost, there were multiple games where I had game/break points and I just don't know how to put them away. I'll bet if I'd converted just half of those game that I ultimately lost throughout the season, I'd have won half my matches. But I have a lot to build on. I have to keep reminding myself that I have only been playing tennis for about two and a half months. I think it's a matter of experience. I will get there. I will. And then those guys are going to play catch up to me.

    Thanks for all the tips....I read them all, take it all in, and store it away in my resevoir of knowledge. It'll all make a difference in getting me where I want to be. I know I sound like an overly intense player, but I really do enjoy every bit of tennis, even when I lose. You have to lose before you can win. I have won at this level before......this particular league just had all high level players this time around, and I can appreciate that. Though I lost, I became a better player. Now it's on to my weekly class, some private instruction, get in better shape, and come out swinging next time 'round.

    Thanks again, peeps'.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
    #29
  30. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,335
    should of just hit to his back hand. Oh well. Next session!
     
    #30
  31. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    15,095
    Aw, man.

    So you only got three quality shots over the net?
     
    #31
  32. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    Haha. No, there were times that I was absolutely pummeling forehands at him, hard and deep, but then he'd get something good back to put me on the defensive, and I'd counter with a weaker shot. Then quite often he'd be able to hit one of those crafty winners that I couldn't reach. I'm learning that this is what I need to do more of.......this is how I can combat against these crafty guys being able to get unreachable shots off on me.

    It's all good....I'm getting there. I know what I need to work on. Backhand. Fitness. I'm goin' all the way.
     
    #32
  33. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    Surecatch: pummeled forehand to his backhand.
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Surecatch: pummeled forehand to his backhand.
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Surecatch: pummeled forehand to his backhand.
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Surecatch: pummeled forehand to his backhand that misses just wide or long.

    So it went. Haha.
     
    #33
  34. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,335
    So you did do it?? haha. OK, based on that exchange I would suggest not pummeling! Higher looping topspin (deep as possible) to an average 3.5 back hand will have them in serious trouble very quickly.
     
    #34
  35. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    It's a process. I'm learning. It wasn't like that every time, of course......it did happen a number of times though when I was really grooving the forehand and felt like I couldn't miss.

    No biggie. Overall I played fairly well and learned some things....that's what's most important. Winning will come.
     
    #35
  36. Sakkijarvi

    Sakkijarvi Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2007
    Messages:
    505
    Ok, I like this accounting and will roll with it from my match yesterday, three sets, 6-2, 6-1, 6-3., maybe a little insight into thinking, your approach during these exchanges. My opponent was of the 'golden retriever' category, a little younger than me, very fast and fit. Many rallies I got to hit 6-8 shots. Went about 3 hours.

    OP:

    Surecatch: pummeled forehand to his backhand.
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Surecatch: pummeled forehand to his backhand.
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Surecatch: pummeled forehand to his backhand.
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Surecatch: pummeled forehand to his backhand that misses just wide or long.

    *********

    Sakki: Deep looping topspin forehand to his backhand.
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Sakki: Another forehand to his backhand, this one a little wider, lower, angled to force him off the court. Build slight advantage over previous stroke
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Sakki: Another forehand to his backhand, same wide angle.
    Him: Medium-paced block return.
    Sakki: Topspin forehand to opposite corner, plenty of room over the net, not loopy though.
    Him: Runs across baseline, another medium-paced block return.
    Sakki: Wrong foots opponent with repeat of previous shot to deuce side as he tries to recover to middle.
    Him: Uses quickness to halt, medium-paced block return.
    Sakki: BH slice, short, not aiming to create drop-shot winner (and thus more margin) to ad court.Him: Rushes in to cover, flips ball to duece, basically dropping the dropper back ...or;
    Him: Pushes short ball long over baseline ... or;
    Him: Nets short ball ... or;
    Him: Attempts to lob short ball.
    Sakki: In all of the above, come in behind the shot and hit down the line winner, cross-court winner (holding shot until last moment to see which direction he leans in), lob over his backhand shoulder, hit overhead winner on short lob ... or in the event of successful lob, run back, cover it with deep loopy defensive counter lob to his backhand corner and start point all over again.

    That is one point. To enjoy playing a pusher you buy into creating these combinations for a couple of hours. Good cardio.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
    #36
  37. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW
    I would take the "just hit to the BH" advice with a gigantic grain of salt. Back in the day of one handed backhands, that may have worked at beginning levels, but in the Modern era, at the beginning levels the 2 handed BH is often more consistant than the FH, as the OP found in his matches.
     
    #37
  38. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,375
    Maybe the advice should be - pick the weaker side.

    As a 1hb player, even if I am hitting vs a 2hbh player, odds are their backhand still isn't as good as their forehand and my forehand is better than their back hand.
     
    #38
  39. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,375
    -Might be time to add the approach and volley to your game. Make him swing and try to pass you, not just block back your ball deep.

    -Could your opponent volley and handle the short ball? Draw him in then lob or pummel a forehand passing shot.

    -Also think about working on short angles to open up the court.

    -Can he generate his own pace off the backhand? How did he handle a slow, deep, high topspin looper to the backhand? How about getting low for a deep slice?
     
    #39
  40. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    These are great pieces of advice, and ones I'm trying. I am working on the net game, at the right time of course, but I seem to get passed a lot. I think it's because I follow in a weak shot of mine off a short ball.

    One of my greatest problems is positioning. I routinely find myself in the wrong part of the court. If i hit something short, they come in and drop and angle on me, and I'm back on the baseline. I'm fast, but I seem to be just a half step too behind the second bounce.

    But thanks for the advice...I'll keep all of it in mind.
     
    #40
  41. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW
    Depends on your defintion of "good". Lot's of folks' FH have way more pace than their BHs, but that ain't "better". The OP's FH had way more pace than his opponent's BH , but it was less consistant, so it was "worse" and he lost those points.
     
    #41
  42. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,375
    No problem. Keep working on that game. It will pay off in the long run.

    Yeah, if you approach, you're going to want that ball to land fairly deep.
     
    #42
  43. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    Yeah, those are the pieces of information that are starting to "come to me" like light bulbs, and this is how I know that my tennis IQ is improving. That's an important part of it too. You can have the shots, you can have the fitness, but you have to have the experience too, and that's what I have the least of. For the most part, I have the shots, by my tennis acumen is still developing and my fitness could definitely be improved on. I have the athleticism, but the fitness to go with it is a bit behind.

    Thanks, bro'.
     
    #43
  44. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,375
    True, but there's always the possibility that if the OP hit to his opponent's forehand, his opponent would have smoked the ball back and hit winners instead of just bunting it back and keeping him in the point.... I don't know as the OP didn't comment on whether his opponent's forehand was more powerful and just as consistent.

    Guess it just comes down to figuring out which side presents less of a danger even if you're against a better player.
     
    #44
  45. Big_Dangerous

    Big_Dangerous Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2010
    Messages:
    6,184
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    But I like going out wide on the deuce side.

    :)
     
    #45
  46. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    4,091
    Location:
    NorCal Bay Area
    The context here is non-USTA 3.5 level.
    Based on the USTA 3.0 and 3.5 players I see at my club, hitting predominantly to the backhand would be a good strategy in 90% of cases.
     
    #46
  47. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,886
    Location:
    At Large
    If I had to give the OP one piece of advice to cross over that line and convert close losses into wins: put more balls in play. A lot more points are lost on errors within 2-3 shots than are won with brilliant (or lucky) shotmaking. So get more first serves in, limit errors on returns of serve. Make your opponent play, don't give him anything for free.
     
    #47
  48. Surecatch

    Surecatch Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    638
    It's very true.......at this level, errors are much more prevalent than outright winners, and I follow that for the most part. But when I'm dialed in and grooving the forehand, when I feel the zen of supreme concentration within a rally coming over me, I will go for winners or more advanced strategic plays. I want to eventually be better than 3.5. The only way to get there is to take some chances, results be damned. I don't mind missing when I take a chance. I do mind missing when I try something because of fear or impatience.
     
    #48
  49. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW
    Maybe at your club, but in this case it wasn't. I attempted to explain why. Your thoughts why it didn't?
     
    #49
  50. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW

    Assuming that the OP has the accuracy to hit to whichever side he wants to, which I would assume reading between the lines of his postings, he (and his opponents) would likely improve their games by not concentrating on their opponent's strokes (weaker vs stronger) and do what everyone else is doing, namely hitting to the side of the court that the geometry of the court/net dictates is more likely to lead to a better shot from you, regardless of what side it is for your opponent. Since the better shot from you, is going to have a better time of leading to a weaker shot from him, regardless if he has to hit a FH or a BH.
     
    #50

Share This Page