Glasses...

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by TimothyO, Jun 14, 2012.

  1. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    Currently I own two pairs of prescription glasses (I'm near sighted). One pair is my basic rectangular frame. The other are aviator sunglasses.

    I really enjoy playing with my aviators as the field of view is large and I feel like I hit better. With the rectangulars I feel like I get jammed and don't see the ball as well (same prescription). I feel like the narrow rectangular frames are distracting, especially on serve.

    The other day I dropped the rectangulars on an oriental carpet in our family room and found them...with my foot. :shock:

    So I'm off to get new glasses this weekend.

    Current plan it so get two aviators for tennis, one polarized and the other clear for night games.

    Is there a better shape for tennis with respect to field of view and depth perception?

    Do those fancy sports glasses with swappable lenses make a difference?

    I read somewhere that certain lens colors enhance the ball's color. Is that true?

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    #2
  3. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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  4. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    You don't like The Lovin' Spoonful? John Sebastian? Come on!!
     
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  5. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Teal blue makes optic yellow easier to see (not that it is difficult to see ordinarily).

    I can't imagine using glasses to play tennis because of getting sweat on the lenses during a point, but if the Pros are any measure, they all use wrap glasses.
     
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  6. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Although we usually turn our heads to look at the ball, there are times when our our eyes are at the very edge of our eye sockets:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Therefore when choosing frames for tennis, look up and to the side and be sure that there are not areas you can look over or to the side of.

    Also you do not want thick frames that will block areas of vision.

    There are three ways to help solve the problem of not having your frame not producing blind spots: Big lenses, curved base 8 frames (wraparounds), and getting the lenses closer to your eye.


    Base 8 lenses that curve around the side of your head will let you look at a ball like Fed does in the picture above.
    [​IMG] http://dizmeyewear.com/technology/

    But the curved base 8 lenses are more difficult to make without distortion being introduced from the curvature.
    Oakley has a reputation for producing the best central and peripheral vision in their curved lenses:
    http://www.oakley.com/innovation/optical-superiority/prescription/lenses
    They have a web site that compares their lens clarity to other brands in a very graphic way using side by side comparison of a grid field: http://www.oakley.com/innovation/optical-superiority/polarized/clarity
    It is the brand worn by Sam Stosur, Tipsarevic, and many major league baseball players.
    [​IMG]


    If money was no object, I think most tennis players would go for Oakley lenses for tennis for both clear- and sun- glasses.
    (Not to mention the replacement costs for scratched/lost glasses.)



    A less expensive, but still pretty good option is the Bolle Prescription Lens Adapter for Parole and Vigilante Sunglasses http://www.opticsplanet.net/bolle-action-sport-vigilante-parole-rx-sos-adapter-cr-39-clear-lens.html
    The lens insert fits very close to your eyes so there is essentially no loss of peripheral vision.
    An advantage of this system is that when your outside sunglass lens gets eventually scratched, replacement snap in lenses are fairly inexpensive. (The inner prescription insert is protected, so it shouldn't get scratched.)



    Hunters, fishermen, and golfer's are partial to brown lenses for sunglasses to enhance contrast in bright sunlight, and yellow lenses to enhance contrast on overcast days, or in low light. http://www.bolle.com/technology/lens/simulator.aspxe contrast on overcast days.
    I love amber (yellow-brown) colored lenses to provide the best contrast on tennis courts where I play.
    I like polarized lenses, as there seems to be a lot of glare off the courts I play on, and from the fence and off the windshields of cars that are in the parking lot.
    Very dark grey lenses make the ball appear as a dark blob to me.


    Bolle makes a special teal colored lens that does provide contrast, but are so light colored that they are poor sunglasses. Also the teal color lets in more harmful rays, so that one opthalmologist even wrote a paper urging tennis players not to use them:

    "Double Fault!
    Ocular Hazards of a Tennis Sunglass
    -Michael F. Marmor, MD

    My impression is that most of the visual problems from playing a
    sport in bright sunlight are a result of glare and of the brightness of the
    sky, which sets the general level of light sensitivity and can make a playing
    surface appear relatively dark.
    This is why a tunnel appears black inside as we approach it in sunlight.
    What can the ophthalmologist recommend?
    For tennis, wear a cap and good sunglasses. Simply wearing a cap with a visor will not only reduce glare but will also make the court appear relatively brighter (as does a tunnel once we enter it).
    A neutral gray or amber sunglass that blocks 99% to 100% of UV-A and
    UV-B light will provide additional protection and may even help
    slightly to make the ball stand out (depending on the color of the
    court).

    However, there is no rationale for a blue lens, whether for children,
    tennis players, or anyone else.
    Ophthalmologists should be aware of the properties and the risks of blue
    lenses to advise parents of young children and sports-minded patients.
    Tennis players in particular should be aware that a blue lens
    commits a double fault, and does not serve well for either perception or
    safety."
    - http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/119/7/1064.pdf


    Another thing to check on your sunglasses is that there is not a lot of room at the top, bottom and sides of the sunglasses to let in extra light/glare.


    And finally, wearing shatter resistant CR 39 plastic lenses, or other lenses certified as shatterproof, make sense so as not to incur an injury.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2012
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  7. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    I had a horrible problem with the curved lenses in my prescription sunglasses from Maui Jim. Bad distortion. I had the frames heated and flattened as much as was possible. This helped, but I still can't use them for tennis. They work fine for other things though.
     
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  8. McPatrickClan

    McPatrickClan New User

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    Anyone tried the cheaper Wal-Mart Rx sunglasses? They are $100 for polarized sunglass lenses and then another $30-55 for the frames.
     
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  9. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    Using blue lenses that "enhance" the visibility of the ball will also enhance and intensify the visibility of the other yellow thing that enters your field of view at times -- the sun.
     
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  10. McPatrickClan

    McPatrickClan New User

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    The Bolle sunglasses listed above would probably meet that criteria.
     
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  11. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    Wow! Great information, thanks Charlie!!!
     
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  12. dman72

    dman72 Hall of Fame

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    Get contacts if they are an option. Then you can wear whatever sunglasses you want during the day.

    I hate playing with glasses. I always feel like I'm going to knock them off my head when serving, and the damn sweat is always getting on them.
     
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  13. McPatrickClan

    McPatrickClan New User

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    I wish I could touch my eye! I just cannot get used to contacts.
     
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  14. dman72

    dman72 Hall of Fame

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    I am the biggest wimp when it comes to my eyes and I learned to get them in. You don't have to put them directly on the pupil, I use the "look up, place lens on white, look down" method and it's worked for me for years.

    Your vision is so much better with contacts opposed to glasses, you're selling yourself short.
     
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  15. austintennis2005

    austintennis2005 Semi-Pro

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    i tried contacts--i liked the nike ones they had a few years back that were discontinued....however i found that they and all other contacts would get blurry when it was windy which is most of the time in texas...does anyone else have that issue with contacts?
     
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  16. chollyred

    chollyred Rookie

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    Sometimes mine get either blurry or sticky feeling. If I'm going to be in a real windy situation, I either carry wetting drops to clear them, or wear wrap around type sunglasses to help with the wind. I've even thought of using clear safety glasses to block the wind on cloudy days.
     
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  17. iantrevor

    iantrevor New User

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  18. db10s

    db10s Hall of Fame

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    HAHA! Nice^

    OP: I wear contacts, but on top I wear non-Prescription polarized Oakley Flak Jackets.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2012
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  19. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    I collect sunglasses as well as tennis rackets so hopefully I can be of some use here...

    Lately I've found Oakley Jawbones to be perfect for tennis, as I can change lenses rather easily and quickly before a match depending on light conditions.

    The Flak Jacket XLJ's are my favourite to use for any sport as they don't have the "jaw" at the bottom of the lenses, but it really depends on how you see normally. I rarely find myself looking down with my peripheral vision so it's not a huge issue to me to loose that 2mm edge of vision at the bottom of my lense with the Jawbones.

    However if money is no object and you want to experience the "best" in my opinion from Oakley, check out the Fast Jacket line. They are absolutely awesome! I borrowed a pair of mine from a buddy and they are great, but the retail price here of around $320 is a bit off putting for me at least. The only negative to them is the sides do feel a bit large (right where the arms connect to the lens) but that's just more of me being picky then anything else.

    So if you are deciding to go down the Oakley root and you have any questions on the glasses I mentioned, let me know. :D

    -Fuji
     
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  20. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    Same here, can't do it.
     
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