Gluten-free experiences?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by heycal, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    I remain intrigued by this whole gluten free fad, and the many people who claim it improved their lives significantly. I'm less interested in the weight loss aspects of it than I am the general well-being. (For otherwise healthy people, I mean, not celiac sufferers.) The reports of aches and pains going away, the increased energy, minor chronic conditions clearing up, and so on.

    Two questions about it come to mind though:

    1) Does an otherwise healthy person need to be hypervigilant about it -- checking ingredients, insuring against cross contamination, and so on -- to gain the benefits of it? Or can one just concentrate on the bigger picture of cutting out obvious sources of gluten and not sweat the small stuff and still see significant gains?

    It's one thing to cut out bread and cereal and the like and replace it with other ordinary food, but quite another to worry about hidden sources of gluten and trace amounts of it in everything under the sun. The former seems doable, the latter seems too onerous a way to live unless gluten is making you very sick or something.

    2) Did those who go gluten free and see benefits also cut out sugar and other bad stuff for them at the same time? I'm suspicious of these people who attribute going gluten free with dramatic improvements in their life, when it also turns out they gave up every other damn thing that might be bad for them at the same time.

    In short, I guess I'm asking: is just cutting out bread and pasta, etc. enough to feel like a million bucks, or does one have to do a complete and radical overhaul of every aspect of their diet to see real benefits? Is it the kind of like exercise, where a little bit can still help a lot and the more you can do the better, or a different type of thing?

    I'd love to hear folks experiences with going gluten-free. Please share.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
    #1
  2. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW
    The good news is that you actually don't need to know the answer to those questions. Since it is a fad (as you mention) it is really easy nowadays to try it out for yourself and come to you own conclusion, which by definition, will be 100% accurate for you personally.
     
    #2
  3. Brian11785

    Brian11785 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,517
    Location:
    TX
    It's been about six months since I've decided to cut wheat out of my diet. It is not that I believed it was bad for me blanketly. But it was definitely the source of most of the empty calories and processed junk I'd consume throughout the day (desserts, bagels, pastries (Mmmmm....Panera Bear Claws), half loaves of bread dipped in olive oil, pizza, etc.) Saying "no wheat" just makes things simple for me and cuts out SO many temptations.
    I am not sure if wheat was the source of this problem, but cutting it (along with lowering my intake of other processed foods--and substituting meats, beans, veggies, fruit, and (mostly brown) rice--has been a great move. My daily energy levels are better, I don't get those horrible mid-afternoon slumps at work like I once did. Clearer mind. Clearer complexion. All good. I have dropped about 10 pounds, but weight loss was not really a goal of mine. Think it's probably from not having so many blood-sugar dips that lead to food cravings throughout the day.

    What I do NOT do is buy all that processed "Gluten Free" substitute-for-wheat products crap: cookies, pizza dough, etc. That stuff is good for people with actual allergies, not those trying to eat healthy.
     
    #3
  4. Povl Carstensen

    Povl Carstensen Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2004
    Messages:
    5,757
    Totally like my experience. And I have never been hypervigilant about it. Its just about being aware of how some foods affect you, and relate to it. To me wheat resembles sugar a lot in its influence on you.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
    #4
  5. Brian11785

    Brian11785 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,517
    Location:
    TX
    Agreed. I've cut down on my sugar as well, but still eat plenty of fruit (including dried fruit and some--thought mostly diluted--juices, which are supposed to be "high-glycemic index" foods.) To me, wheat is worse than sugar.
     
    #5
  6. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,371
    It is pretty much a fad and does not make sense unless you have an issue with Gluten.. otherwise you are wasting you money and effort. See your doctor to see if you have an issue with gluten. Many folks with autism are are on gluten and casein free diets along with folks with celiac disease. The rest of us are just trying another fad diet. Nothing special about removing gluten from your diet. No great health or performace enhancements.. again unless you have an issue with gluten.. Pretty much crap...:) Best way to test is to remove it from your diet. Then you will know.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
    #6
  7. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,639
    I make my own pizza dough, and go out of my way to find high gluten flour.

    I am having pasta tonight.

    I do well on a high gluten diet.
     
    #7
  8. Brian11785

    Brian11785 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,517
    Location:
    TX
    How is removing something from your diet a waste of time (or especially) money?
     
    #8
  9. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    If we were talking about some other aspect of life, I'd be inclined to agree with you. But since wheat and sugar products are my favorite things in the world, I'm loathe to make the hard sacrifice for several weeks unless there is a very good chance at wonderful success.

    Some people eat to live. I live to eat. I'd seriously rather do 30 days in the county jail than 30 days with no wheat (and sugar) unless I'm gonna feel fantastic and never want to touch the stuff again.

    Iinteresting to hear, but it sounds like you cut out so much other stuff too, so maybe if you added back some wheat you'd feel just as good.

    I'd love to find somebody who could say "I still drink coke and eat ice cream and all sorts of crappy meats and cheeses, but I still feel great because I don't eat gluten". Love to know what's causing what, ya know?

    So we just ignore the many, many people who claim going gluten free has tarnsformed their lives for the better and produced great health and performance enhancements?

    Believe me, I'm dying to dismiss this stuff as some useless fad, but the number of testimonials to its success is hard to ignore, while at the same time the number of people who've tried it and claim it did NOT help them seems miniscule. Kind of compelling.

    If you got a source for a bunch of stories along the lines of "I went gluten free for a month and didn't feel any better" I'm all ears! Seriously. I would love to find info along these lines, so I can dismiss this horrible notion of giving up wheat.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
    #9
  10. comeback

    comeback Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,192
    You said you substitute (mostly brown rice)...is that a "gluten free" product or regular?
     
    #10
  11. Brian11785

    Brian11785 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,517
    Location:
    TX
    Sounds like you want a quick fix. Those don't really exist. It takes discipline and a more holistic approach in order to feel great. Your description of your sugar/wheat dependency above really sounds like a drug addiction. I promise that cravings will subside once you go a few weeks without "doing a line" of wheat or sugar.
     
    #11
  12. Brian11785

    Brian11785 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,517
    Location:
    TX
    Rice is wheat and gluten free naturally. Brown rice is seen as better for you than white rice, since it is less refined and does not spike your blood sugar like white rice does. Sort of like the difference between white bread and whole grain wheat bread.
     
    #12
  13. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    It's not that I want a "quick fix", it's that I want a real, lasting, and dramatic one. I'll do the work if great results are practically guaranteed.

    As an example of what I mean, and one that is relevant to my own life, I once thought I couldn't live without cigarettes, or at least wouldn't want to. But I finally quit my 25 year, 2 pack a day habit cold turkey after reading a book on the subject.

    The thing is, a myriad of postive benefits were practically guaranteed in that case. So it was relatively easy to give up something so addictive and such a part of my life because of the obvious benefits that would accrue. (That said, I don't remember feeling 100 times better phsyically or anything, and I still miss it sometimes.)

    But wheat, and sugar, seem even more important to me than cigarettes did, and postiive results aren't even guaranteed if I make what for me is a huge sacrifice by giving them up.

    What would be left to live for, Brian? Coffee?
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
    #13
  14. Brian11785

    Brian11785 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,517
    Location:
    TX
    I am sure the science behind the benefits of a gluten-free diet is not definitive enough for you. Certainly not to the extent that there is behind giving up cigarettes. If I were you, I would work on looking at my sources of sugar and wheat. If you can't give them up, try eating more whole grains and fruits as opposed to all the processed stuff.

    And tennis and exercise are my new addictions.
     
    #14
  15. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    I don't even need science. If 95 out of 100 people say they feel vastly better after giving up gluten, so much better that they have no problem living that way for the rest of their lives, that would be good enough for me. But if it's more like "7 out 10 people say they feel slightly better, and only 3 out of 10 think they can sustain this lifestyle for the long term", than it's not compelling enough data for me.

    As for my own diet these days, I realize that in my quest to stay fit at age 50, I already eat about 1/3 less wheat than I used to, and about 15% less sugar, and just a tad better in general than I used to even one or two years ago. Probably not enough to notice or expect any differences though.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
    #15
  16. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,371
    Again.... if you think it works for you... go for it. You seem to be missing the point. Were is the science that indicates that wheat is bad for you? It may be bad for you if your system has a problem with is... that is for sure. Whole wheat is one of the building blocks for a balanced, good diet. Again... if indeed you have a problem with wheat go for it... but in general why would you???. Removing bad (simple) carbs makes sense of course and added sugar/salt/smoking/extra weight/drinking...just removing gluten for the heck of it makes no sense. You should next remove all milk products.. soy..corn and eggs. And... yes money. Gluten free product cost more!!! I know I have child that is Gluten/milk/soy free (15 years). I know what I am talking about. I have been at this much longer than most of you.

    What you seem to be doing is removing simple (white) carbs.. that makes sense. Enjoy the current marketing/fad diet.

    BTW... if you get the testing done like my daughter.. then you can be sure.
     
    #16
  17. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,371
    Sorry all you did was clean up your diet and remove simple carbs....you are eating less sugar and produced sugar and you added more complex carbs. That is really what you did. Removing wheat was just a by product of your efforts. BTW... it is very hard to remove all gluten. Do the research.. you will find you are still eating some.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
    #17
  18. Brian11785

    Brian11785 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,517
    Location:
    TX
    And vegetarians rarely can totally avoid all animal products. I have no allergy, so I am not too concerned with eliminating every trace. But that doesn't mean I can't develop the eating patterns that improve my health on the whole.

    As for gluten-free products being expensive. That is true about the processed substitute junk you buy at Whole Foods or whatever. I occasionally buy rice pasta, but that is the extent of my "gluten-free" labeled product consumption.
     
    #18
  19. Povl Carstensen

    Povl Carstensen Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2004
    Messages:
    5,757
    It does not have to be all or nothing at all, dont let that discourage you. The way I go about eating less wheat, is that I substitute bread and pasta with vegetables on my plate (100% or to an extent). Perhaps some fruit eaten as dessert/afterwards. Not extremely expensive. And I do have pizza and pasta once in a while. At home I only use full grain though.
    The exercise is to edcate yourself a little as to where you get your carbs from, and steer it away from what is bad for you (using your own experience as a prime indicator), probably sugar and grains, especially refined ones.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
    #19
  20. maleyoyo

    maleyoyo Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    333
    How about 80/20 rule? Spend 20% of your effort to achieve 80% of your goal.

    I picked my top 3 to make changes few years ago. I reduce sugar, carb consumption by 50% and 30% respectively which isn’t that hard to do. In addition, increase my exercise by 20%. My math tells me I’ve improved my health 100%.

    Now I can’t even finish a slice of my favorite cake because it’s too sweet; the one I could eat a whole thing in one seating before. I used to love my pizza, bread, and pasta, but now I feel really bloated when I eat them and they are not as enjoyable as they used to be.

    My weight stays the same but I lose a couple of inches around the waist and feel much more energetic and younger.
    Believe me, when you switch your life to a new direction, you will find many other things to enjoy as long as you are willing to try.

    For a fun read, you may want to try “4 hour body” or “Wheat belly” even though I find their views a bit extreme.
     
    #20
  21. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    I ask you again, Steve: What do you make of the many, many non-celiac sufferers who claim amazing improvements after giving up gluten, as opposed to the seemingly few (or even none!) who said it didn't help them tremendously. It's all in their heads?

    Also, have you read "Wheat Belly"? This guy makes the case that today's wheat is basically poison. You should read it, if only to see if you can rebut it.

    I cut down on various stuff too, but it sure didn't lower my enjoyement of or capacity for eating huge amounts of junky food when I allow myself to. (That trophy i have for a third place pizza eating contest 15 years ago wasn't a fluke!)

    I have read both Wheat Belly and 4 Hour Body. If the Wheat book is right, it's scary stuff. The Ferris book seems a bit far fetched in its many miracle claims. (I also wonder how he could have done reasonable trial and error experiments on all his various recommendations without spending about 3 million days on earth. The math seems suspicious.)
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
    #21
  22. maleyoyo

    maleyoyo Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    333
    ^^^

    At times I struggle with the portions too, but I change my approach toward eating. I focus on quality instead of quantity and you sure pay a lot more for that at first, but it does pay off in the long run. My impression is that my stomach does “shrink” over time. Every time I look at my second apple pie ala mode and think how much I have to work out to burn that off, it does put me off.
    If you love eating, you’ve got to find other distractions to counter that. When I go on vacations, I tend to eat a lot more but I always lose weight instead of gaining. The difference makers are the quality of food and I am way more active on vacations including cruises.
     
    #22
  23. Boricua

    Boricua Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    3,096
    There is a scientific theory that states that people with O negative blood should not eat foods with gluten.:

    I believed that no two people on the face of the earth were alike; no two people have the same fingerprints, lip prints or voice prints. No two blades of grass or snowflakes are alike. Because I felt that all people were different from one another, I did not think it was logical that they should eat the same foods. It became clear to me that since each person was housed in a special body with different strengths, weaknesses and nutritional requirements, the only way to maintain health or cure illness was to accommodate to that particular patient's specific needs.
    - Dr. James L. D'Adamo

    To some, the connection between their blood type and the diet required according to the blood type, may sound a bit far-fetched; whilst to others, it may be the most obvious link that they might or might not have thought of. Dr. D'Adamo came down to the conclusion that the kind of foods that were easily metabolized and were hence better for a person of a particular blood type weren't necessarily so for another.

    Here, however, we're about to understand the basics of the O negative blood type diet. The diet for people of both, O positive as well as O negative blood type, is the same. The history of the O blood type will make it easier for you to understand why to eat what you should eat, as the origins from where you came help you understand your path better as to where you're headed.

    O is for Old. The blood type O ancestors have been the Cro-Magnon, who were here almost 40,000 years ago and have been the roots of the people who branched out as O blood type. They hunted, and in organized packs, making use of weapons and tools that gave them strength beyond the measure of an ordinary bare-handed human, letting go of fear of any animal rivals they could have. And, they became efficient hunters without many natural predators at all. Their population went up and their main source of nutrition (fuel) was protein that came from meat. Later, however the competition between them and the scarcity of meat on those hunting grounds made them disperse far and wide, out of Africa towards Europe and Asia, soon occupying all lands except Antarctica.

    Type O: The Hunter
    Meat eater
    Robust and tough digestive tract
    Highly active immune system
    Best way to deal with stress is rigorous physical activity
    Cannot adapt easily to drastic dietary and environmental changes
    An efficient metabolism is essential to stay lean, healthy and energetic
    The Ketosis Key
    There were slight alterations in the hunter-gatherer's physical demands, the general digestive activity and way of metabolism of the O blood type ancestors, due to a diet which was high in protein and fat, with a few carbohydrates. Which means that instead of carbohydrates being broken down to glucose, the body metabolizes fats and proteins to ketones, which are used instead of sugars, to keep glucose levels steady.

    So, you may be sitting back and blinking and thinking to the thought of saturated fats that are unhealthy and that eating too much meat is bad for you. Meats that are injected and pumped up with hormones and other dangerous antibiotics to plump up, are certainly best to avoid most entirely. But organic meats aren't so bad for the O blood type and are actually the fuel that your body needs. Think about the foods that require hunting! It would certainly not be a field of wheat or a glass of milk. So, O blood types won't benefit much from drinking milk and eating bread. Their systems aren't quite so entirely adapted to dairy and grains the way that other blood types are.

    Losing Weight
    The main reason why you may be piling on the pounds is not the meat you eat, but due to the amount of grains, pulses and legumes you have in your diet. Wheat - whole wheat and wheat germ - has gluten, which puts a stress on your metabolism, acting against ketosis. This means that your calories are not utilized efficiently, stressing your digestive system out. The gluten lectins oppose the proper metabolism of insulin.Another factor to consider is that the muscle tissue in O blood types is more acidic, hence you might as well avoid legumes, pulses and beans that have lectins making your muscle tissues a bit unnaturally alkaline.

    The regulation of the thyroid is another factor to consider for weight gain. Hypothyroidism is another reason why O blood types gain weight. Insufficient levels of iodine lead to hypothyroidism symptoms of which include muscle loss and fatigue and retention of fluids that is the cause of bloating and weight gain.

    Foods Promoting Weight Gain
    Interfering with insulin and slowing metabolism:
    Sweet corn
    Hindering the utilization of calories:
    Kidney beans
    Navy beans
    Lentils
    Hindering thyroid hormone:
    Cabbage
    Brussels sprouts
    Cauliflower
    Foods Promoting Weight Loss
    Foods containing iodine to avoid hypothyroidism:
    Kelp
    Seafood
    Iodized salt
    Sources of vitamin B that are great for efficient metabolism:
    Liver
    Red meat
    Kale
    Spinach
    Broccoli
     
    #23
  24. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,362
    Location:
    NA
    I really think this kind of math is dependent on the person. I prefer to exercise more and eat more, I find that a better way for me of feeling and being healthy than dieting.

    That said, I've always been a fan of supplementing my meals with fresh fruit and veg, and have never been into things like mcdonalds or taco bell. So I suppose I do watch what I eat, along with exercise it allows me to eat a lot of it guilt-free. :)

    As goes cutting gluten, I don't feel the need, but power to those that feel better for doing it.
     
    #24
  25. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW

    I agree with you on the importance of cuisine. That is specifically why I mentioned that in this era it is easy to test. Back in the day in order to go gluten free you would have to give up wheat. Nowadays there are plenty of gluten free pasta, pizza, whatever your heart desires. Does is taste right? Of course not but we are talking 2-3 weeks here. Easy as (gluten free) pie...

    BTW sugar doesn't have gluten.
     
    #25
  26. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    Well, I do kind of believe those who say the best way to go gluten free is to eliminate gluten 'naturally', and avoid foods engineered in the laboratory to be gluten free subsitutes for those real gluten products since they are bad for you in their own ways. Though I guess two or three weeks of this wouldn't be terrible in that regard.

    As for sugar, that is why I expressed in an interest in hearing stories from people who gave up gluten but continued eating sugar. For as I mentioned, it seems many people knock out both at the same time, and go on a whole healthy food kick in general, so one is left wonder exactly what is making them feel better.

    Are there really no decent studies out of there of people's experiences with going gluten free versus a 'control' group?

    I'd love to see a study that divided a large group of people into three categories for 60 days or so: A) those who gave up gluten only, B) those who gave up gluten and sugar and caffeine, etc., and C) those who ate whatever they wanted. Then quiz those folks to see if they felt better or worse 60 days later, and to what degree.
     
    #26
  27. NickC

    NickC Professional

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    East Coast, USA. Formally Tucson, AZ
    I gave up gluten about 6 years ago after it was discovered that I had an intolerance to it. Not a celiac, but I did notice a difference. I grew an inch within 2 months of giving it up cold turkey. I filled out a tad but I think even at 23 I'm still filling out. I'm a lot leaner, though.

    It's been great. Granted, I generally eat very healthy anyway (almost no alcohol save for a glass of wine every month, 1 can of soda a year, no crappy foods, lots of fruit, lots of vegetables, lots of rice, etc...) and I think it's helped a ton.
     
    #27
  28. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    So you were eating very healthy to begin with, but giving up gluten made you feel better in various physical ways? (Or just lose some weight?)

    Also, what is the definition of an "intolerance" to gluten as opposed to celiac, and how exactly is that tested and/or diagnosed?
     
    #28
  29. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW
    Actually that study was done in the Netherlands last year. The result was that what you are calling: Group A felt 48% better, Gr B felt 52% better and Gr C felt 42% better.

    Just kidding, but you know the results would be something like that. What can you do with numbers like that? That's what I meant by "100% accuracy" if you try it yourself.

    As an asside, I get that you are looking to eliminate sugar as a long term goal, which is fine but if you only change one thing at a time, you'll have a better appreciation of which things impact you in which ways.
     
    #29
  30. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    Maybe they would be, and I would find numbers like that meaningful, in the sense that the take away for me would be "some people think it works for them, so maybe try it sometime myself if I get desperate". But if the numbers were more dramatic, like 90 percent of the no gluten people felt great as opposed to 10 percent of the control group, obviously I'd draw a different conclusion and be like "wow, I really need to try this".
     
    #30
  31. NickC

    NickC Professional

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    East Coast, USA. Formally Tucson, AZ
    Yeah, I was eating pretty well beforehand but not as well as I started doing when I went gluten-free. I wasn't as tired and I was in general more aware than before.

    As for intolerance vs having celiac disease, I would compare myself to my grandmother who is extremely allergic to gluten and cannot be around it, much less eat it, whereas if I have a beer (which doesn't happen) or a hot dog bun, I'd get very smelly gas constantly for the first 2 hours after consumption, mixed in with throwing up if I had too much, a very bad stomach ache, I'd feel very tired, diarrhea a few hours later (and the next day), I'd sweat a lot and I'd cramp up quite quickly too.
     
    #31
  32. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    Was there a specific test that confirmed this?

    Even without one, it does sound like gluten doesn't suit you. I know I can personally eat like 8 slices of pizza, a liter of coke, and a dozen chocolate chip cookies and feel no ill effects.

    Well, maybe I'd fall asleep a couple of hours later, but certainly no vomiting or stomach ache...
     
    #32
  33. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW
    I don't disagree with your post, but studies with findings like you describe are either uncommon, or so obvious you could have predicted them without the study.

    I wouldn't hold my breath for funding to study a nonpatentable product...
     
    #33
  34. basil J

    basil J Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    2,472
    Location:
    boston area
    I gave up Gluten for a period two summers ago and felt a tremendous improvement in flexibility, energy level and well being. The main reason I tried giving it up was due to chronic joint pain in my shoulder, left knee and lower back. My doctor suggested i try it and see if I felt better. During this winter, because I ski almost every weekend and it is hard to stay on a Gfree diet I came off the gluten free diet and within 3 weeks all of the aches and pains returned. I just started the G-free diet again hoping to have similar results as the first time. It was not hard and a side benefit is that I get very lean during this type of diet and I like that too!
     
    #34
  35. 3fees

    3fees Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    2,241
    Location:
    NorCal
    Gluten free potato chips are not bad. As far as gluten free being a wonder for better health- I doubt it, wake up and smell the coffee.
    Go get an allergy test for foods, you may be allergic too some foods your not aware of-allergies will sap your health-aches and pains, ect. more than not exercising, playing blinds mans bluff with your health is not recommended.

    :shock:
     
    #35
  36. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,335
    Location:
    On the courts; hard & clay ...
    For someone who isn't allergic, isn't gluten free the equivalent of low carb?
     
    #36
  37. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    Why was it hard to remain gluten free during ski season?

    Anyway, please keep us posted this time around. How old are you, btw?

    Actually it is recommended by the author of "Wheat Belly", scores of other nutritionists, and the countless folks who report they felt huge improvements after doing it.

    I mean, when a friend who previously had no known allergies or issues with gluten says to me "heycal, I went gluten free and all my aches and pains went away. A few months in, I had some gluten without my knowledge (at a restaurant) and my pain immediately came back. I resumed gluten free and all the pain disappeared again, and remains so to this day" I'm supposed to go "Well, I wouldn't play blind man's bluff with my health like that. I'm not going to do something foolish like you did..."

    I have little doubt going gluten free is basically good for you. The only question for me is if I could personally bear giving up all that stuff.

    In what sense?
     
    #37
  38. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    4,902
    My g/f seems to be wheat intolerant. What you have to understand is that it can effect your intestine without being an actual allergy on your skin. This is why the gold standard for Celiac's is an actual small intenstine biopsy.

    You don't want to get an small intestine biopsy if you can help it because its a surgical procedure and has associated risks.

    I have the 'wheat belly' book on my kindle. The guys basic theory if I remember right is that the wheat we eat nowadays is very modern and a cross of more old fashioned varieties with grass.

    This kind of wheat causes both hard on the intestine and causes some kind of addictive effects in humans.

    Not sure I 100% buy his theory..but skipping carbs like bread and pasta is going to be very good for more sedentary people anyway - so I am not complaining..

    FWIW I would champion white rice over the brown varieties. Rice was refined for a reason. Ancient cultures wouldn't just waste valuable time refining stuff if they felt the outer husk was good for you..
     
    #38
  39. thejackal

    thejackal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2004
    Messages:
    2,885
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    did the low-carb diet outlined on 4 hour body for 6 months

    breakfast: 3 eggs, spinach, hot salsa

    lunch: 1/2 roast chicken, grilled veggies

    dinner: homemade beef chili

    anytime snack: 2% yogurt mixed with almond butter

    went from about 14% bf down to 12.5% and gained some muscle, but it got hard to maintain so now I only follow the breakfast part of the menu and eat normally the rest of the day. seems to have the most benefit with the least effort
     
    #39
  40. colowhisper

    colowhisper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    531
    I am experimenting with no/low gluten diet right now and noticed similar effects. No other dietary changes, but major changes in joint stiffness and energy levels.
     
    #40
  41. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    How "low" gluten do you need to go to experience the benefits?

    Low gluten I couldn't probably do if it paid benefits. NO gluten at all seems impossible for any length of time or enjoyment of life.
     
    #41
  42. comeback

    comeback Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,192
    I am on day 23 of 90% gluten free and paleo..Going great so far..I am waiting a good 6-8 weeks before i give a full report and pictures..
     
    #42
  43. colowhisper

    colowhisper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    531
    I agree wholeheartedly, I really live for my occasional beers! So fair I have just eliminated the bulk of bread and pasta etc from my routine meals. Mostly backfilling the carbs with fresh fruit in the a.m. and veggies for lunch. Meats and salads for dinners. More corn products all around, ie corn tortilla instead of flour. Obviously not very scientific, but I definetely notice a pretty big difference in energy levels when I go off the wagon.
     
    #43
  44. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    Have you also changed the amount of sugar you have?
     
    #44
  45. colowhisper

    colowhisper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    531
    I am definitely eating more fruit during this experiment, so yes. Could be responsible for the energy boosts? But I don't get crashes like I did when eating a lot of wheat for breakfast (eg english muffins, toast, pancakes).
     
    #45
  46. heycal

    heycal Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,451
    I guess i meant fake sugar. Has that changed much in your diet, or just the absence of wheat? The reason I ask is that people often go gluten free AND sugar free and other such healthy changes at the same time, so I'm just wondering about all the variables here.

    Also, if you were eating muffins, toast, pancakes, etc for breakfast, are you sure it was the wheat and not the amount of food/calories you ate that caused the crash?
     
    #46
  47. superdave3

    superdave3 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    106
    According to an article in Men's Health magazine, gluten is only a protein found in wheat, and less than 1% of the population have intolerances from it, most of which are labeled as celiac disease victims. For the rest of us, cutting out gluten has no affect on the body. Carbs in excess are not good, but keep in mind your body needs carbs, as well as proteins and fats.
     
    #47
  48. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,371
    Really... I am shocked.. shocked I tell ya... so you are saying that most folks cutting out gluten has no effect on the body? Most of what these folks are seeing is a cleaning out of their system, reduction of bad carbs and sugars. You can do that by eating whole foods and removing added sugar and eating whole grains (wheat or rice). Very few folks have an intolerance to gluten, folks with celiac disease and some autism victims. Again... removing all gluten from your diet is not an easy thing. The cost of going completely gluten free is not cheap and really a big waste of time for almost everyone. Eat whole foods, reduce sugar, fats and salt and you will be trim and lean in no time. This whole Gluten Free approach is again another fad diet.
     
    #48
  49. Jeebs

    Jeebs Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    135
    Location:
    London
    Actually carbs are the only macronutrient your body doesn't need
     
    #49
  50. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,430
    Location:
    Make TT better, use the Ignore List!
    Thank you, I was hoping someone else would point this out. There are no 'essential' carbs and the minimum daily amount of carbs required by the body is zero.
     
    #50

Share This Page