Going cold turkey

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by niremetal, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. niremetal

    niremetal New User

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    I spiraled down the dark path of racquet addiction over the past few months. After demoing and buying countless many sticks from TW, that auction site, and my local pro shop, I decided to tally up the total amount I spent on racquets. I was pretty amazed when I saw the final number :shock:. I can honestly say that I have no real desire to buy any more racquets.

    Some of the ones I already have need to go in order to pay the bills. It will be tough deciding which ones go on the chopping block, but tough choices are part of life.

    I've always had something of an "addictive personality," but my "addictions" (be it to particular bands, gadgets, or books) tend to be things that I burn through in a few months. Usually they run their course on their own, but racquets are an expensive addiction to feed.

    Not to mention that I'm only a 3.5 and continually messing with my racquets is messing with my game and consistency.

    Anyway, I'm going cold turkey on this one. No more new purchases whatsoever. I'll hit through with my current frames for a few weeks and narrow it down to just 2 or 3 sticks that will be my regulars. Hopefully by the time spring rolls around I'll have cut my racquet-induced deficit by more than half.
     
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  2. Hi I'm Ray

    Hi I'm Ray Hall of Fame

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    Too many rackets and adjustments to make = big distractions from improving your game. Just stick with one that feels "right," has a good balance of characteristics, and is one you feel leaves plenty of room for growth.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2012
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  3. oragne lovre

    oragne lovre New User

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    I understand what you're going through since I'm on the same boat :)
    Reading a good book that is about tennis racquet may help relieve your impulse to buy and enforce your will to go cold turkey.
     
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  4. acura9927

    acura9927 Semi-Pro

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    Buy used on **** and sell it for a few bucks less is probably your only remedy if you like stuff. I was in the same boat as you, I like new racquets than I keep selling them for half what I paid for and in near mint shape to some lucky player.

    Now I buy demos and used sticks and dont lose much if any.
     
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  5. 0d1n

    0d1n Hall of Fame

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    I have gone from 14 or 15 different racquets (obviously, I had more of one model...usually 2-3) to 6.
    I used to have 3 of my main racquet and a number of others...to hit with.
    I currently own 5 of my "main" which are identical and 1 collectible which I won't sell for "sentimental" reasons.
    I could live with 3 of my main...but there's no reason to not keep the 2 others and just rotate them...they will all have a longer life.
    All is good with current setup...I don't regret my decision of getting rid of the "extras".
     
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  6. NickJ

    NickJ Rookie

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    I used to have about 25-30 which compared to some people on these boards isn't a huge amount. I got rid of a few to clear space but mainly to then fund the frames I wanted to stick with. i used to buy 2nd hand off auction or ex-demo, use them for a few weeks then sell on, and over time the collection just grew. One day I put them all together as they were in different parts of the house, various bags and like you, thought I needed a clear out!
    I've kept my absolute faves and ones i just couldn't let go, and then the ones I use day to day match to match. I'm now down to 10. But always on the lookout for something else . . . .
     
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  7. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    Could you guys share as to what frames you had? I've demoed about 20 sticks and bought 4 on a whim. I've lost hundreds of dollars on trying new rackets out, but I must say it has been fun. Kinda reminds me somewhat of a pilgrimage..."as I walk through the valley of the shadow of death I will fear no evil, for my main racket is still with me." Lol.

    It's just been an eye opener, and I can honestly say that out of all those rackets there were only 4 that I could have probably used well. I believe a BLX Blade is on it's way from the North Pole as we speak, though...
     
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  8. colowhisper

    colowhisper Semi-Pro

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    Compared to some of the other "life time" sports you can play into your later years, tennis is inexpensive. Golf, cycling, skiing are much more worrisome to have an "addiction" to. So I say count your blessings and enjoy some fresh gut strings as you play on a free or near free court! But it goes without saying that if you really can't afford it you are right to quit buying.
     
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  9. coolblue123

    coolblue123 Hall of Fame

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    follow the FIFO rule for racquets and as prev posters mentioned, buy used racquets. Decide on which one's u want to get rid of before buying. Makes life easy + you can use the money from the sale to fund ur new stick.
     
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  10. rafafan20

    rafafan20 Professional

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    The fact that it is hurting your game should help... consistency is important
     
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  11. goose guy

    goose guy New User

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    So true. Biking upgrades r expensive. But auto racing even more so.
     
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  12. 3fees

    3fees Hall of Fame

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    The grass is not always greener on the other side of the hill.
    Buying on the cutting edge make sure you dont get cut.
    Dont lose your head to woman that will spend your bread.

    I have 3 L6 LM Prestiges, circa 2004,they keep up with any speed of tennis ball and return it tit for tat and are customizable.

    A Pro can take any racquet and adjust where and how he hits with it to get it to work for him. The Tennis Player makes the racquet not the other way around.

    :mrgreen:
     
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  13. McLovin

    McLovin Hall of Fame

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    ...in related news, Tennis Warehouse stock takes a 20% hit in midday trading amid fears its customers are 'going cold turkey'...
     
    #13
  14. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    My first year of playing I tried many different frames. Cost a lot of money but was well worth it since I learned so much about what fits me as my game developed. As I learned more about how to play tennis I also learned how frame and string can enhance or impede one's playing experience. I've known the joy of feeling like the racquet was an extension of my arm and the frustration of feeling like I was fighting the frame to keep the ball in.

    My second year I stuck with one frame which was helpful technique-wise. I only tested a frame here and there. As my game developed and I recognized certain realities of playing 3.0/3.5 tennis as a middle aged guy I was able to further refine what I needed in my next frame.

    This year and next my plan is to stick with one frame (modified PSGT) and one string setup. I know I'll use VS Touch mains and a poly cross and I've given myself until Dec. 31 to make a final decision on the cross. At that point I'll be using the same setup till Dec. 31 of 2014 at least (that's the plan anyway).

    At one level the investment in time and money was painful but I can't say I regret it. I've progressed very quickly and can hit with more consistency, accuracy, and pace than my friends who took up or re-entered the game at the same time I did. Others who started with me have dropped out in frustration.

    I'm convinced that yes, it takes a lot of effort to fit the racquet (tool) to the player perfectly. And it's well worth it in playing satisfaction.
     
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  15. Herdsman76

    Herdsman76 Rookie

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    I'm in total agreement with you niremetal. The only difference with me is that as I've picked up new racquets to try, the "used" ones have been sold to help keep my costs down.

    As I'm a 3.5 tournament player, I first had to find a racquet I was comfortable with. I found that with my declining physical abilities I was in need of a lighter and more maneuverable racquet. After a few misses I found the 2012 Babolat PD 107 suited my needs. But I can say I spent a whole lotta cash to "find" it. Then came the quest for the right strings. That wasn't cheap either until I settled on two different strings which I alternate from time to time. What cost me the most was experimenting with the right tensions for the strings I use. I rarely break strings so if I got the tension wrong, that meant a new string job!

    The reason, I'm telling you this is that when you find the right equipment for you, the results will soon start to come. I now feel that with my current set-up, I have no worries when it comes to match play in tournaments. The only actual worry is execution of my shots.

    Just be patient and give each racquet a solid chance. Once you find the right combo, be ready to have fun and play hard!

    H76
     
    #15
  16. Candide

    Candide Professional

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    This makes me feel great I've only gone through 8 racquets in the last 4 years and I thought I had some serious issues. Now I feel almost sane.
     
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  17. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    I've gone through 5 in two years
     
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  18. MAXXply

    MAXXply Hall of Fame

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    Take my hand...look into my eyes...YOU ARE NOT ALONE...Together we can defeat this insidious scourge of racketholism...Together we will win...
     
    #18
  19. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    I can speak for the bike parts, as I also practice cycling. Good wheels: from 300 to 1200 buck; new component group: around 800, etc.

    To summarize, every little part on your bike costs about the same as or more than a tennis racquet.

    Buying and selling used frames is much cheaper. I personally have to do that whenever I wanna test something because there is no demoing available where I live. But I find that the wait until you get the racquet, the times you try it out and give it a fair chance, then trying to sell it off to buy another one,... all of that causes such a delay that the losses over time are not very big.

    One thing I have learnt is to buy one used racquet at a time. Sometimes you get so enthusiastic when you read reviews here you immediately wanna buy two or three. That is really not a good idea. Even if you seem to like a racquet, it is better to wait until you buy some backups. Often by the time you buy the backups, you've finally discovered that the racquet, although you initially liked it, is not really the best for you.
     
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  20. parasailing

    parasailing Hall of Fame

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    Buying tennis racquets and trying new ones is all part of the fun especially considering it's one of the cheaper addictions.

    Tennis is good for your fitness and it beats other sports like OP mentioned. It's a rather harmless addiction and one that rewards you with a lifetime of fun.
     
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  21. pvaudio

    pvaudio Legend

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    I have around 20 racquets. 9 and 7 are of the same type, then 2 and 2. 18 are dunlop, 2 are the Head IG Prestige Pros I use now :lol:
     
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  22. pug

    pug Semi-Pro

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    Very well said! It is part of the game that I love and I don't intend to quit trying out new racquets. Why? For 5% more consistency or to save a few bucks? When they pay me to use a certain racquet I will stop.
     
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  23. niremetal

    niremetal New User

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    If you consider $100+ racquets a cheap addiction, I'd like to know what you consider expensive :shock:.

    Racquets are an awful lot like cars. The second you drive a car off the lot, it loses 20% of its value. Same the moment you string and hit with a racquet for the first time. As I've discovered when I tried to re-sell my "demo" frames (which I usually bought in "slightly used" condition).

    I agree that tennis itself is an expensive and harmless (indeed, beneficial) addiction. But continuously buying and trying new racquets? Neither cheap nor harmless (as my wonky strokes will attest).
     
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  24. parasailing

    parasailing Hall of Fame

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    Some things that I can think of include drugs, gambling, and alcohol addiction which are destructive and cost way more than $100+ racquets. Even if you were to lose $20 or $30 bucks per racquet, it's still a drop in bucket compared to those vices. Cars also would be another thing that has a much steeper depreciation cost.

    For me, trying new racquets doesn't really mess with my strokes much since I will either like the new racquet I purchase or stick with what works for me. I currently use a PSTGT and have demoed and purchased over 40 racquets in the past 2 years.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
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  25. pug

    pug Semi-Pro

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    How many people here drop $5 for a coffee every day and $10 for lunch also? That is $50 to $100 or more each week. I make my own coffee and lunch. Leaves plenty left over to play with tennis racquets.
     
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  26. oragne lovre

    oragne lovre New User

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    I second it. There are tangible and intangible costs. Addiction to drugs, gambling, alcohol has intangible cost which is unquantifiable damage to mental and physical health. Addiction to racquets, if translated to addiction to the sport, is conversely beneficial to addicts' health: Tennis helps players learn how to stay mentally focused and physically fit. As a result, I don't mind losing some tangible dollars to gain intangible health benefit.

    In terms of cars, not only do they have much steeper decpreciation, they also entail insurance cost. I've so far never heard of required racquet insurance.
     
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  27. niremetal

    niremetal New User

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    Uh...you won't get any argument from me that drug/alcohol/gambling addictions are worse than racquets and more costly. But the fact that something else is more expensive (and unhealthy to boot) doesn't change the fact that racquets are still damned expensive.
     
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  28. 0d1n

    0d1n Hall of Fame

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    Of course it doesn't. Logical fallacies are lovely.
    You are saying that trying out racquets all the time is very expensive when comparing it to sticking with one racquet model that suits you, buying a few of those and playing with them for years.
    Others are introducing other (disaster) scenarios into the debate. Things like, yes...but when compared to being a heroin addict, you still come off cheaper. Well...duh...really??

    That's like going to your boss and asking for a bigger paycheck since your productivity has grown, the company profit has grown and you've taken on more responsibility lately and him saying...but wait...you are very well payed compared to the cleaning lady, and you have a great life compared to the homeless...you should be happy with your current paycheck :D.
    It may all be very true, but it's totally unrelated to you asking for a raise for very practical and well founded reasons ;).
     
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  29. oragne lovre

    oragne lovre New User

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    Perception of value is relative; a $100 racquet is expensive to those who are not addictive to tennis but the same racquet is not that expensive to those who love tinkering with their toys. Level of income can also be a factor; a $100 racquet is an expensive item to those who make, say, $30,000 a year but it is not to those who make $300,000 a year.

    Addiction and passion are two faces of the same coin. Addiction is unhealthy if it causes dysfunction in one's life, i.e. deteriorating work performance, ruined marriage, etc. Addiction becomes a passion if it incentivizes, fuels, and propels one to perform better in one's career and fitness. Of course, many addicts like to rationalize their addiction and believe that their passion is healthy :)

    Posters who join this debate love tennis racquets. It's impossible to tell if they are addicts or enthusiasts. They are, however, well-meaning and feel for the OP. I would also go cold turkey the moment my colleagues, friends, or wife say that I look and behave like an addict :)
     
    #29
  30. canadad

    canadad Semi-Pro

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    #30
  31. cork_screw

    cork_screw Hall of Fame

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    You got a serious problem. Sell all your racquets and just use one racquet that you play well in matches. Don't worry what racquet you rally best with. I had a stick that I didn't maintain a long rally with, but some reason I won a bunch of matches with it. This is some type of weird addiction. You're a hoarder. Stop it.
     
    #31
  32. Dreamcastin

    Dreamcastin Rookie

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    and if you spent a thousand buying performance items for your car, you likely bought one thing that needs a few thousand dollars worth of parts to function "right" or benefit you. I literally had to stop going to my favorite forum because my bank account could no longer support me. My other main hobbies tennis and video games feel very cheap to me and I try to focus on those.:)
     
    #32
  33. gamerx52986

    gamerx52986 Rookie

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    Tennis and video games are my main hobbies and I think I spend about the same on both equally. Granted games are $60 but I spent $300 on my gaming headset then $170 on my custom controller so paying about $175-$200 for a racquet doesnt bother me.
     
    #33

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